The Grenvile Phillips Column – Solving Barbados’ Gang Problems

Submitted by Grenville Phillips II, Leader of Solutions Barbados

Several very expensive solutions to Barbados’ gang and drug problems are available.  In desperation, the Government may be tempted to select one of them and unnecessarily push Barbados further into debt.  Given Government’s tendency to partially implement solutions and then realize that they are unaffordable, the money will likely be wasted.

Since we currently have ‘mauby’ pockets, an effective and economical (not costly) solution would more likely be implemented to completion.  In designing solutions for our youth, we should remember our responsibility to them, which is to provide an environment where they can be trained to receive the baton of leadership, so that they can responsibly manage this legacy which is Barbados.

Once this vision is accepted, then the solution reveals itself.  On the gang issue, there are three groups of youths that need to be targeted.  The first group is the current secondary school students who are being prepared to leave school with no marketable skills.

The second group is those who have already graduated from secondary school without any marketable skills, and are coming to the realization that the only employment opportunities available to them are within a gang.

The third group is gang leaders, who think that the only way that they can participate in Barbados’ economy is through recruiting others to engage in the illegal drug trade.  Permanent solutions need to be designed for each group.

In designing permanent solutions, it is important to address the root causes and not only the symptoms.  One root cause of our gangs is the secondary school curriculum, which results in many students leaving school without any marketable skills.  This brings us to the solution for our current students.

The existing school curriculum needs to be rearranged so that students spend their first three years learning the more exciting, easier-to-learn, and more marketable practical aspects of the subjects.  During this time, all students should be taught, among other things: conversational languages, applied sciences and arts, and music-by-ear.

All students should at least know how to cook, make marketable products from raw materials at home (eg: coconut oil from coconuts), perform basic accounting, perform basic maintenance on manufactured products, and speak and write well.  The final two years should be spent learning the more challenging theoretical aspects of subjects in preparation for the CXC examinations.

Those who have already left school without marketable skills will soon realise that as adults, they need money.  Individual counselling and group seminars may be useful for their personal development; however, it does not pay bills.  They are aware that they do not possess marketable skills to get anything but labourer positions, and in the current economic climate, those entry-level positions are already taken by those who left school before them.  Therefore, the solution is to give them the training to start their own profitable businesses.

Walbrent College conducts free practical workshops that train persons, with no apparent marketable skills, to start and grow a business with no start-up money.  The College used to teach the workshop to inmates in prison so that they could have had a legitimate source of income following their release.

The next free 5-day workshop for unemployed and under-employed persons will likely be held within one month.  Walbrent College is hosting a free public town-hall meeting on Sunday 10th September at 5:00 pm at Combermere School, where participants may register themselves and others to attend the free workshop.

At the town hall meeting, Roger Husbands, who accurately predicted the current gang activity now described by the Police, has been invited to make further predictions based on an analysis of the current situation.  Solutions Barbados will explain their plan to effectively and economically address Barbados’ gang and crime problems.  All are welcome to attend.

The third group comprises gang leaders who control gang members.  Many of them wish that there was another way, but feel trapped in the hazardous drug trade.  They desperately need to manage the development, marketing and distribution of a safer product.

Fortunately, there are an unlimited amount of replacement products to which they can apply their unique management skills.  They simply need to see the resulting income in order to be convinced to make the switch.

When an area is being flooded by an open faucet, the first order of business is to turn it off and then proceed with the clean-up.  Changing the secondary school curriculum to give all students marketable skills is the equivalent of turning off the faucet.  This requires the support of the Ministry of Education.  It is to their shame that a new school term is about to start and the curriculum remains unchanged.

Grenville Phillips II is the founder of Solutions Barbados and can be reached at NextParty246@gmail.com
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26 Comments on “The Grenvile Phillips Column – Solving Barbados’ Gang Problems”

  1. Bajan Free Party/CUP-PCP.Violet Beckles Plantation Deeds from 1926-2017 land tax bills and no Deeds,BLPand DLP Massive land Fruad and PONZI September 6, 2017 at 1:55 AM #

    Remove the DLP and BLP and the Problem is over,

    Like

  2. Well Well & Consequences Observing Blogger. September 6, 2017 at 4:28 AM #

    More trade schools are needed, reduce the certificate churning paper mills and establish real schools that offer trades that actually help the students prepare for the real world….

    …..more modern societies are moving to trade schools since degrees are becoming less useful in helping graduates find gainful employment and most are useless in creating self employed people.

    Like

  3. Enuff September 6, 2017 at 8:43 AM #

    Stupse, gang members do indeed have “marketable skills”! They are team players; they influence and negotiate; they are strategic, flexible and innovative; they account and audit; and, of course they can sell goods. The issue is lack of OPPORTUNITY. For example, when SJPP, Skills Training and Walbrent College trains artisans, but a vertically integrated comglomnerate that manufactures concrete slabs gets the majority of government’s building contracts where are these “marketable skills” to be used? Skills are only marketable if access to a market exists. Regarding the “root”, the real root is unmasking the protected masterminds behind the importation of drugs and guns, including the facilitators. What about removing the illegality of marijuana, which accounts for the large majority of the drug trade? This is just another example of SB’s puritanical, narrow-minded, non-evidence based “solution” to issues that are very complex. All of a sudden Pastor Roger Husbands “predicted” gang activity in Barbados–a development that Bajans were well aware of since Keith Simmons was Justice Minister. But of course, Pastor Husbands, who it appears has had his damascene moment, is the oracle on gangs in Barbados just because he is a “pastor”. Finally, where have I heard about these “bring yuh idea and come” workshops before….that’s right, right here in BU, and I am still awaiting a report on its success. #sbaintready

    Like

  4. Artaxerxes September 6, 2017 at 9:13 AM #

    Grenville Phillips II is targeting three (3) groups :

    ………. “current secondary school students who are being prepared to leave school with no marketable skills.”

    ………. “those who have already graduated from secondary school without any marketable skills.”

    ………. “gang leaders, who think that the only way that they can participate in Barbados’ economy is through recruiting others to engage in the illegal drug trade.”

    All of whom make up the “lower end” of the scale.

    But what are Grenville Phillips II’s plans for those “big up” people who facilitate the importation of illegal drugs, firearms and ammunition, who have “immunity” and are most likely are protected by wealthy businessmen, politicians, police and the system?

    As long as these people continue to exist, no matter how many fancy colleges you establish, how many times you change the educational curriculum, youngsters in search of quick money will always be recruited to be involved in the illegal drug trade.

    Was not a Civil Engineer charged for the importation of $837,000 worth of marijuana?

    Get rid of the top men first…………

    Like

  5. Tron September 6, 2017 at 1:09 PM #

    Grenville,

    Crime in Bim won´t stop before the pest called lawyers is erased.

    We must abolish the current court system and send home the magistrates and judges. What we need is a People´s Court next to Bussa´s statute with hanging, hacking, lashing, forced labor and deportation, consisting of ordinary citizens, without defense lawyers and relying on good old customs.

    We also need to punish the families of the criminals on the block, since they largely profit from the drug soldiers through allowances. And last not least we need capital punishment for the rich boys behind the desk who profit from money laundering and organised crime.

    Some say crime belongs to the Caribbean like pepper and salt to fish. I say, without maximum pain inflicted, no gain.

    Like

  6. Gabriel September 6, 2017 at 2:14 PM #

    Enuff @8.43am
    I remember Keith Simmons the Justice Minister and Keith Whittaker of the RBPF denying there were gangs in Barbados back in those halcyon days of DLP governance.Now that the DLP is back in full glare of public scrunity I haven’t had an update of their input despite a each man now pun a commission.

    Like

  7. Artaxerxes September 6, 2017 at 8:11 PM #

    Gabriel September 6, 2017 at 2:14 PM #

    “I remember Keith Simmons the Justice Minister and Keith Whittaker of the RBPF denying there were gangs in Barbados back in those halcyon days of DLP governance.”

    @ Gabriel

    Are you sure “there are no gangs in Barbados” is not attributed to then Attorney General Sir Maurice King?

    Like

  8. Gabriel September 6, 2017 at 10:22 PM #

    Arta
    Keith had a role in the youth at some time.I don’t recall the role but he spoke for the Dems on youth matters.I think I’m correct.

    Like

  9. de pedantic Dribbler September 7, 2017 at 3:04 AM #

    Regardless of who originated the remarks it was simply political expediency by the DLP directorate (And the others too). Just as it is now again with the inane remarks attributed to MP Paul.

    Keith Simmons was an active youth leader in his St. James area and part of a national effort during those days as I recall.

    But regardless of roles and orgs, it was simply the type of cover-my-party’s-ass verbiage that defiles otherwise we’ll meaning pols.

    And back then he really had lots of gravitas as a upfront, straight talking type of man.

    Like

  10. Artaxerxes September 7, 2017 at 4:26 AM #

    @ Gabriel

    And I believe you’re incorrect…….. It was indeed Maurice King who said there were no gangs in Barbados,

    Like

  11. David September 7, 2017 at 4:27 AM #

    Keith Simmons was one of the people behind Trents Summer Camp if memory serves.

    Like

  12. Artaxerxes September 7, 2017 at 5:22 AM #

    ………… And when he was Minister of Community Development, he and Ralph Walker were the architects of the Barbados Youth Service.

    Like

  13. Artaxerxes September 7, 2017 at 5:23 AM #

    The same Ralph Walker who was responsible for developing Pinelands Creative Workshop.

    Like

  14. Well Well & Consequences Observing Blogger. September 7, 2017 at 5:31 AM #

    Denial works well in aiding the destruction of the society..

    Now the gang from port ferdinand is claiming that no guns and drugs are coming through their port because they have nice security…

    …. so you can guarantee and we can be sure without any doubt that drugs and guns are making their way through ports charles and ferdinand on a daily basis…..they are not being policed sufficiently by local authorities,.

    Why is the coast guard and military not watching these 2 ports on a 24 hour basis, the 2 ports having their own security means a steady flow of drugs and guns…

    Like

  15. TheGazer September 7, 2017 at 10:39 AM #

    @W&W
    Just silly questions
    Does the RBF has unrestricted access to these enclaves
    Does the RBF has the power of search and arrest in these enclave
    Is it two or three Barbadoses?
    Have we adopted the model of South Africa even though the police and the political power are in black hands?

    Like

  16. millertheanunnaki September 7, 2017 at 10:59 AM #

    @ Tron September 6, 2017 at 1:09 PM
    “We also need to punish the families of the criminals on the block, since they largely profit from the drug soldiers through allowances. And last not least we need capital punishment for the rich boys behind the desk who profit from money laundering and organised crime.
    Some say crime belongs to the Caribbean like pepper and salt to fish. I say, without maximum pain inflicted, no gain.”

    The Caribbean has always been a basin of criminal activity and trade in contraband going back to the very days of piracy. Marijuana and cocaine are the modern-day equivalent to rum and gold bullion in the days of Blackbeard and Morgan.

    Where ever there are huge profits to be made without costly inputs of raw material and labour but merely determined by the interaction of an ‘underground’ unquenchable demand and a risky supply chain there will always be players out to score some big financial hits.

    So why not bring the business (trade) from underground and make it a less financially rewarding but socially accepted enterprise like alcohol production and distribution and gold selling and buying.

    We don’t think your harsh forms of punishment will fly in today’s world where walking the plank to be consumed by ever-hungry sharks is worse than swinging from a rope in a room at Dodds.

    Like

  17. Tron September 7, 2017 at 11:24 AM #

    Miller,

    As you know, some of my suggestions are somehow rhetorical to push things over the cliff, since the people in charge in Bim have the fatal tendency to trivialize things.

    I agree with your proposal that the swamp called underground needs a dry out, eg legalizing weed and homosexual actions, nudism and gambling in Barbados, to name only a few. Tourism would greatly profit. Cocaine seems to be more complicated. I will not deny the fact that tourists drive the demand for that drug by far more than the locals.

    Like

  18. Well Well & Consequences Observing Blogger. September 7, 2017 at 11:27 AM #

    Gazer…the 2 black governments have for the last 50 years, allowed the 7,500 minorities on the island to practice racism, segreation, apartheid and allowed them the freedom to commit crimes including assault, murder, drug and gun running and money laundering….

    ….both black governments tied the hands of the police from locking up these minority criminals, gave them special treatment, make them believe they are special and above the law, which caused low morale within the police force and has resulted in many corrupt police officers.

    The actions of both corrupt governments have resulted in minority criminal networks springing up across the island, which needs to be dismantled.

    Like

  19. Artaxexes September 7, 2017 at 1:30 PM #

    “It is also fair to mention “black governments for the last 50 years have also allowed (black people) to practice racism, segreation and apartheid” amongst themselves as well.

    This is manifested in “the old school tie” mentality; segregation in the form of separating themselves into the “heights and terraces;” apartheid in the form of living in gated communities; racism in the form of black people of lighter complexion insulting their black brothers and sisters who are of darker complexions.

    Who should take the blame for black people ALLOWING themselves to be MANIPULATED by the “7,500 (????) minorities on the island” into committing “crimes including assault, murder (against each other), gun running and money laundering?”

    It is actually indicative of how stupid black people have remained over the years……………THAT WE PREFER TO BE LED RATHER THAN LEAD.

    “The minority criminal networks” have a market, not because of the “actions of both corrupt governments,” but mainly because they are “patronized” by black people.

    Why cast blame on the minorities only, when the same politicians allow black “drug lords” the freedom to commit similar atrocities against their own people and have also “tied the hands of the police from locking up these “MAJORITY” criminals, gave them special treatment, make them believe they are special and above the law, which caused low morale within the police force and has resulted in many corrupt police officers.”

    Yes, these same black drug lords who finance the political campaigns of politicians, provide them with “hired cars,” and money to distribute in the ghetto to solicit votes.

    Why can’t these same black people take POSITIVE EXAMPLES from the “minorities” who endeavour to assist each other, support each other’s businesses and look out for each other…………… and endeavour to do LIKEWISE……….. rather than DESTROYING each other?

    Okay, let’s “lock up” the 7,500 minorities………….. that will solve the problem………….. then we have to deal with the 50,000 minorities involved in similar activities.

    Like

  20. Well Well & Consequences Observing Blogger. September 7, 2017 at 4:50 PM #

    Art…I dont know where ya getting ya numbers from, but with all you say the corrupt black governments allow a minority of black yardfowls to do, they are still not the ones controlling the contracts belonging to taxpayers, thiefing taxpayer money by the hundreds of millions, nor pensioners money by hundreds of millions.., read 4 seasons scams, cahill scam, NHC scams, grotto, valery, coverley scam etc, and the pending Hyatt scam along with all the other hundred million dollars scams too numerous to mention, or controlling all the finances on the island….so explain that….

    Here is how I count minorities…

    There are no more than 2.5 percent who consider themselves white = 7,500 of the 285,000 population…give or take.

    1 percent are indians, even less are syrian, lebanese and others which hardly registers as a population.

    The others who Barbados count as minorities number at least 14,000 are like my kids, a mixture of bloodlines, black, white etc…although I view them as a separate race I consider them black, just another bloodline of the black race…but that is just me.

    All others are majority black…at least 260,000 black people.

    Ah cant help it if yall so brainwashed and programmed that ya cant see light or dont know yourselves.., everywhere ya go ya see a white image despite all the faces around you being black on the island, ya hardly see white people because there are not even enough of them to see, unless you pass by a hotel, live in the same areas they do, go to the beach or the supermarket. .I have gone weeks without seeing a white person on the island…

    ….only being able to seeing everything that is positive and attribute it to being white…that is a mental problem.

    Many people got cussed for trying to point out your the destructive way of thinking in the majority population….starting with the asses in parliament…so maybe yall gotta self destructive before ya change ya bad ways.

    Like

  21. fortyacresandamule September 7, 2017 at 5:14 PM #

    No student should be able to leave the secondary system without at least full competence in a vocational subject along with knowedge of entrepreneurship.

    Like

  22. Well Well & Consequences Observing Blogger. September 7, 2017 at 5:25 PM #

    Many people got cussed for trying to point out your destructive way of thinking in the majority population….starting with the asses in parliament…so maybe yall gotta self destruct before ya change ya bad ways.

    Definitely entrepreneurial programs needed in the schools, in 10 years there should be a proliferation of black businesses throughout the island, a sensible government would ban monopolies.

    Like

  23. Well Well & Consequences Observing Blogger. September 7, 2017 at 8:05 PM #

    The UK with all its faults recognizes the overt discrimination practiced against the 3 percent minority black population and is working toward a solution to address why the crime rate is so high among that population…a 12 percent incarceration and recidivism rate in a 3 percent minority population is high indeed.

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/black-people-prison-uk-more-likely-us-lammy-review-a7935061.html

    “Black people in the UK are proportionally more likely to be in prison than those in the US, an independent study on the treatment of BAME people in the criminal justice system has found.

    The review, conducted by Labour MP David Lammy for the Ministry of Justice, found that black people in the UK are four times more likely to be in prison than would be expected given their proportion of the total population.

    While black people account for just 3 per cent of the UK population, they make up 12 per cent of people in prison.

    Ex-offenders ‘should be allowed to hide record from employers’
    The US has a higher proportion of black prisoners (35 per cent) but, at 13 per cent, a much higher proportion of the overall population is black, meaning the disproportionality is less.

    Mr Lammy said the fact that BAME people in the UK are disproportionately ending up in the criminal justice system costs the taxpayer at least £309m each year.

    He said: “There is greater disproportionality in the number of black people in prisons here than in the United States.”

    Like

  24. Well Well @ Consequences Observing Blogger September 8, 2017 at 10:05 AM #

    Caswellll…Akanni is being told where to find the proff of certain customs officers involvement in drug trafficking re importation through the ports of entry.the denials are insulting to the population, the police and the judiciary.

    https://www.barbadostoday.bb/2017/09/06/the-evidence-is-out-there-mr-mcdowall/

    ……If Mr McDowall checks public records he will find that over the past ten years a number of customs officers and clerks have been criminally charged and in some instances convicted and imprisoned for their involvement in illegal drugs being imported into Barbados. Indeed, there are some matters still before the court in keeping with the sloth of our judiciary. If this is not evidence that customs officers employed at our ports of call are from time to time subject to coercion – as occurs worldwide – then the current problem we face with drugs and guns is a mere aberration.

    Mr McDowall was correct when he stated last week that Barbados’ borders are porous and can offer an avenue for the illegal importation of contraband. He is correct because authorities have previously intercepted persons attempting to do just that and they have been prosecuted. But he would pull the wool over his eyes when similar situations occur at our legitimate ports of call and those persons are apprehended.

    The reality is that persons seeking a partnership to assist with the smooth importation of contraband are not going to target a messenger working at Fogarty’s, a primary school teacher at Brumley or a hairdresser at Remy’s. Persons in authority or those strategically placed at our airport and seaport are much better game……

    from a commenter dispeling the lies of port ferdinand management, it`s well known that drugs and guns enter and leave ports charles and ferdinand more often than they should, despite all the lies and denials to the contrary…

    ....even though a shipment of Cocaine was intercepted in Britain, hidden in a false deck of a yacht that was docked at St.Charles for a period of time, before crossing the pond with it’s bounty...

    Like

  25. Artaxexes September 8, 2017 at 10:33 AM #

    ******Okay, let’s “lock up” the 7,500 minorities………….. that will solve the problem………….. then we have to deal with the 50,000 MAJORITIES involved in similar activities.

    Like

  26. Well Well & Consequences Observing Blogger. September 8, 2017 at 1:28 PM #

    Sooo…you got a problem locking up 50 thousand black criminals, I sure as hell don’t, if it would make the island safer…

    ….. but we want the money launderers, gun runners and major drug distributors in the minority community first, the ones who got the money to import containers of drugs, multiple cars loaded with guns, 7 million dollars worth of cocaine, meth etc…the white, indian, syrian and lebanese ones.

    Like

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