The Jeff Cumberbatch Column – A Perceived Evolution in Candidacy

Jeff Cumberbatch – Chairman of the FTC and Deputy Dean, Law Faculty, UWI, Cave Hill

With the minds of most Barbadians directed towards the upcoming general election campaign, some of the more recent nominations of those political parties expected to face the electorate have caused me to reflect on the evolution of the popular composition of the local political class.

It was not that long ago that the traditional professional, the lawyer or the medical doctor, was thought to be the most able representative for a constituency, perhaps based on the simplistic notion in the first case that the parliamentarian was concerned with the making of the nation’s laws and hence a legal background was desirable. In consequence, many of our leaders in the early days were members of the legal profession; successively Adams the elder, Barrow, Tom Adams and Sir Harold St. John. That pattern was broken only once when Sir Grantley went off to lead the West Indies federal experiment and, even then, a medical doctor replaced him in the person of Dr. Gordon Cummins.

While the reason for the legal practitioner was perhaps based on the notion suggested earlier, the incidence of the medical doctor in addition might best be explained on the basis that the practice of these two professions afforded their exponents the necessary financial independence to survive the loss of a political appointment and to be of some monetary assistance to an impecunious constituent.

That notion gradually evolved into a popular predilection with the economy, especially after the recession of the early 1990s, which gave rise to the populist view that our national fortunes were best left in the hands of one who had some training in economics. It was this that accounted for the near decade and a half electoral supremacy of former Prime Minister and career economist, Mr Owen Arthur, although it should also be observed in the interests of fairness that an economist- led Democratic Labour Party was on one occasion unable to stop the juggernaut of the Arthur regime during his tenure.

After that period, there was a sort of reversion to type in that the next Prime Minister, the late David Thompson, was a lawyer by profession, although it is not clear what role, if any, his profession played in his electoral triumph or whether the nature of his training was merely incidental. Likewise, his successor was also a lawyer by profession, the current Prime Minister, Mr Freundel Stuart, who would have assumed that role. It is assumed, by virtue of his seniority in the line of succession rather than purely because of his professional training.

To those who would argue that the populace does not choose the head of government and thus leadership of the country does not indicate a popular inclination one way or the other, one needs only to enumerate the members of the traditional professions that have managed to secure seats in the elected Lower House of Parliament over our recent history.

Indeed, even now with the populist perception of the attorney-at-law at one of its lowest ebbs, no fewer that twelve members of the Lower House, [DLP (5); BLP (7)] or 40% of the Chamber are purveyors of that profession. Even now there is still a medical doctor among the list of those Honourable Members. On the other hand, while I am not aware of the academic training of all the members, there is but one who may persuasively lay claim to the designation of economist.

The true evolution in perception would appear to have occurred with the most recent actual or proposed party nominations. Given a total of 14 recent nominations of which I am aware; from the DLP (3), Solutions Barbados (9) and the UPP (2), not one is a member of the medical or legal professions. Indeed, Solutions Barbados has already declared its intention to nominate as candidates businesspersons of a certain standing only. The three nominees of the governing DLP are all by inclination what may be termed “community practitioners”, although they each may pursue alternative employment.

For its part, the BLP has also nominated a few new candidates in addition to a number of those who were unsuccessful on the last occasion and are returning to the hustings. Offhand, I am able to recall two only of the latter being lawyers, while I am unable to recall any of their newer nominees being legal practitioners. However, there is a medical doctor and a dentist among them.

It would seem therefore that there has been a subtle evolution in the perception of the respective party executives as to what type of candidate would be the most successful in a constituency. No longer is the traditional professional, especially the lawyer, regarded as the candidate of first choice, even though he or she might scarcely be regarded as an endangered species. While the ability to understand legal principles might no longer be considered a sine qua non of parliamentary representation, the cogent oratory and financial independence that are the accompaniments of most members of this profession may yet have a role to play in attracting electoral support.

Given the emphasis placed on business experience by one of the parties, the relatively recent electoral successes of “pure” businessmen such as Mr Donald Trump in the US and Mr Allen Chastenet in St Lucia, and the economic stringency that the nation is undergoing, it might be an easy step to suppose that if one can run a successful business, then the governance of a country would be “suckeye”.

I am not attracted to this view that I consider superficial. The requirement to look after the welfare of all citizens, especially the most vulnerable, tallies hardly with the business mission that is essentially based on the antithetical survival of the fittest and the bottom line. And while one has to concede that a larger pie affords the state more room to take care of those who are most deserving, it is equally true that the size of our pie is not totally of our making.

Perhaps the major qualification of any candidate is not academic, professional or business credentials but simply a sincere urge to assist those citizens who are in need of such assistance.

In other words, merely a genuine concern for the welfare of his or her fellow constituent.

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38 Comments on “The Jeff Cumberbatch Column – A Perceived Evolution in Candidacy”

  1. Gabriel April 23, 2017 at 6:40 AM #

    I posit there is one that I can think of who fits the description of the last paragraph.Don Blackman.

    Like

  2. David April 23, 2017 at 6:52 AM #

    @Gabriel

    The establishment will eventually pressure representatives like Don Blackman, Hamilton Lashley, Trevor Prescod if you apply the adage that too far east is west.

    Like

  3. David April 23, 2017 at 7:02 AM #

    Peter Wickham’s column signals that performance is not always rewarded if you LOSE. Here is the poin though, the candidate selection process by the political parties is not democratic. Those who argue different are hypocrites.

     

    DLP Losing Performance 2013

    Candidate                         Constituency                             %

    Above Average

    Haynesley Benn …………. (Saint Peter)………………………… 1.9

    Patrick Tannis …………… (Saint Michael South East)….. 1.5

    Francis DePeiza …………. (Saint Michael North)…………. -0.7

    Below Average

    Harcourt Husbands …… (Saint James North)…………….. -1.9

    Rolerick Hinds ………….. (Saint Thomas)……………………. -2.0

    Irene Sandiford-Garner …(Saint Andrew)……………….. -2.2

    Patricia Inniss …………… (Saint Michael North East)…. -2.3

    Verla De Peiza …………….. (Christ Church West)…………. -2.6

    Dennis Holder ……………. (Saint Joseph)……………………… -3.0

    Jepter Ince ………………….. (Saint George North)………….. -3.1

    George Hutson …………… (Saint James Central)…………… -3.8

    Patrick Todd ……………… (Bridgetown)………………………. -6.8

    Kenneth Best ……………… (Saint Michael East)…………….. -7.4

    Esther Byer Suckoo ….. (Saint George South)…………… -13.0

    National Swing…………. -1.5

    – See more at: http://www.nationnews.com/nationnews/news/96016/peter-wickham-dlp-approach-candidate-selection#sthash.yrag6wJj.dpuf

    Like

  4. angela Skeete April 23, 2017 at 7:31 AM #

    So what has Granville presented to the country a selection of business people with no or little known managerial skills on global affairs
    The economic environment in which all countries traveled is controlled and governed by multiple forces it is foolish or wishful thinking for candidate or voter to believe that simplifying aggressive economic problems on the home front can be eradicated by selecting candidates who have shown excellence in their line of business
    The global affairs of this world now directs and dictates that voters do their homework in selecting leaders who are fully aware and are up to par with global affairs
    Small island nations cannot take for granted that their economies are exempt from the failures or negatives of international countries but must fast forward having a presence of mind that what ever choice they make can break or make their economic futures in the global world
    Barbados is caught in the trap of a global malaise a malaise that past leaders were unprepared for part and parcel contributed to leadership who did not have the presence of mind or vision or a want to believe that our affairs are as much having to do in the way we position ourselves within a globalized world
    Good leadership requires vision not just a bunch of selected candidates at any level be it grass roots or status quo

    Like

  5. Gabriel April 23, 2017 at 7:37 AM #

    David
    Sometimes the greater good can have negative consequences for a minority whose influence is not marginal.

    Like

  6. David April 23, 2017 at 7:39 AM #

    @Gabriel

    We understand the point you are making but if we borrow from the philosophy of Bernard Codrington representation as you described it will evolve over time.

    Like

  7. Artax April 23, 2017 at 7:48 AM #

    There may be some measure of merit to Jeff’s comments re: “The requirement to look after the welfare of all citizens, especially the most vulnerable, tallies hardly with the business mission that is essentially based on the antithetical survival of the fittest and the bottom line.”

    Because an individual may have 25 years of “running a business” successfully, does not mean he can perform similarly in managing an economy.

    Some of those candidates who have been saying their business experience qualifies them to manage a country, must take into consideration that realizing a profit of a few hundred thousand dollars does not mean they could manage an economy of billions of dollars.

    There are significant differences between formulating management strategies and developing economic policies. Also, certain relationships that may exist in an economy that do not exist in a business environment, such as trade balances and foreign investments, must be taken into consideration.

    Like

  8. Andrew Simpson April 23, 2017 at 7:50 AM #

    Those individuals desirous of serving in the constituency and professionally qualified professionals needed to manage various economic sectors / represent Barbados as Statesmen on the world stage are not likely to be one and the same.

    Like

  9. Bush Tea April 23, 2017 at 8:00 AM #

    @ Artax
    There are significant differences between formulating management strategies and developing economic policies.
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Lotta shiite!!!
    Economics (whatever the hell THAT is) poppycock.

    It is precisely that lotta economic idiocy that wunna ‘experts’ have introduced in Barbados that now have us rated as junk…. and destined to the junkyard.

    “He who is successful in managing a small enterprise, behold, I will make he ruler over great things.”

    Like

  10. angela Skeete April 23, 2017 at 8:31 AM #

    The failure of small island leadership to sell the vision of Caricom to its people has been a huge mistake such failure has allowed the USA to undercut and undermine small island home grown efforts towards self goverance growth and productivity with a heavy insurgence of USA imports counter productive and a political reality breeding a negative fall out
    which can lead to destabilizing the Carribbean region
    When the foundations of a house is weak the inevitable sooner or later would happen Caribbean leaders need to grasps how much of external affairs are cataclysmic to how they keep their own houses in order and do something to correct it

    Like

  11. Vincent Haynes April 23, 2017 at 8:37 AM #

    In other words, merely a genuine concern for the welfare of his or her fellow constituent.
    ………………………………………………………………………….

    That brand of individual may exists but with the best will in the world no altruistic person could buck the system that presently operates…..as no party would nominate them…..no constituency would vote them in as an independent…..the best they could do is to agitate from the sidelines or even form a pressure group.

    Like

  12. Vincent Haynes April 23, 2017 at 8:39 AM #

    Chuckle……..Amazing how the operatives on the eve of demiting office have all the answers as to what should be done……their eureka moment has arrived.

    Like

  13. William Skinner April 23, 2017 at 8:47 AM #

    Jeff’s column makes interesting reading because it examines whether we are making our way back to candidates who have some outstanding community service in their constituencies. If this is so it is in direct contradiction, to a comment by Peter Wickham made in reference to Hamilton Lashley some time ago:
    “Don’t go and violate your memory by going back again and … appear to be blowing in the wind. The better thing to do would be to say ‘I have served both parties, and done a lot for my people as a Bee and a Dem and it is now time to just ride off into the sunset’ — to bow out gracefully.”

    He also called Lashley as “a relic of an era that has passed”.

    “If you look at his style of politics and the way he addresses individualistic needs I do not think he is a politician of the future. Hammie’s style of leadership is very much characteristic of a style that has long passed. I don’t see him as being on the front burner of political action and activism.

    “But at the same time, however, he represents a constituency where that style of politics has a greater currency. If he was representing a constituency like St. James Central or St. James South, I don’t think his style would be that effective, but in the Pine, especially the poorer sections of the Pine, that style of politics appears to be quite effective and one has to ask if it is the fault of the political system which allows him to be that person, or if it is Mr. Lashley who has created this system that supports him.” donnasealy@barbadostoday.bb

    Here Wickham suggests that candidates and indeed politicians such as Lashley were nothing more than relics of an era that has passed. Now Jeff eloquently states that we are “evolving” and such candidates are becoming more palatable.
    Wickham also said that Lashley’s style as a politician had long passed…….
    In other words Wickham clearly demonstrated that he did not understand the value of such politicians who do not approach constituents by graphs and statistics but by understanding their struggles and challenges. Statistics and polls do not always tell the true story.

    Like

  14. Hal Austin April 23, 2017 at 9:11 AM #

    I am perplexed by what some regard as quality parliamentary candidates. What are the metrics?
    No doubt this grey area is what makes Solutions Barbados, with its corporatist agenda, believe it has the answers to Barbados’ serious social problems.
    In fact, there is a Poujadist odour about Solutions Barbados. First, its ISO master plan will only deal with the organisational and decision-making shortcomings in our policy making.
    This business school remedy is irrelevant. I remember asking a senior politician if newly appointed miniters were given any training and s/he said no.
    Just imagine (I have mentioned this before) some guy from out of a small box of an officer as aa attorney, runs for parliament, gets in and suddenly finds him or herself managing a department with hundreds of people on the payroll and a budget of million of dollars and the right to hire and fire. It is a joke.
    We need a new kind of politic. Equally, nonsense about devaluation and foreign reserves, as immediate answers to the mismanagement of the economy, will not do.
    Big themes are bad for general elections. In February 1974, Edward Heath called a general election on who rules the country, in order to deal with the miners. Heath got three fewer seats than Wilson; Jeremy Thorpe, leader of the Liberals, wanted to form a Coalition with Health, but his MPs warn him off.
    Wilson called another election in October of that year and won a working majority.
    Thatcher had the same thing in 1983, after she had won the Falklands/Malvinas war. She wanted to campaign on her victory (|read May and Brexit) but wiser heads won the day and she campaigned on social issues.
    Landslides do not make good government; all they do is allow rebels to conspire from the back benches.
    The other thing is do not listen to so-called political scientists (there is no such thing) and pollsters are discredited in both the US and UK. They are fraudsters. Ask them to publish their methodologies.
    Stuart and his jokers must go, but that does not mean a walkover for the official Opposition. Ethical independent should start from now making plans to fight in all 30 seats if the candidates are no good.

    Like

  15. William Skinner April 23, 2017 at 9:24 AM #

    @ Hal
    You are correct. Just imagine a lawyer,
    wins a seat, becomes Minister of Education,
    walks into the ministry , summons an
    Education Officer of over thirty years
    experience and gives him a list of the
    people he or she wants to be considered
    to be principals. Sounds like a joke. Think
    again- this actually happened !

    Like

  16. Hal Austin April 23, 2017 at 9:34 AM #

    I know, William. The politician I spoke to was very senior. On another occasion |I spent a Saturday night with a minister, a senator, the minister’s permanent secretary and a Nation journalist, while the minister cooked some Bajan soup.
    We were having a bromance. All from the same district, grew up together, families knew each other, yet the permanent secretary spent the entire evening only speaking to the minister. I used to walk through the gully with the permanent secretary after school.

    Like

  17. de pedantic Dribbler April 23, 2017 at 9:38 AM #

    You noted: “In other words, merely a genuine concern for the welfare of his or her fellow constituent.”

    @Jeff that should always reflect the reason for political aspiration and should be tattooed to the heart of any political practitioners because it is and will always the “the major qualification of any candidate”.

    Politics is the operational oil of governance of which every facet is the work of developing a nation community by community.

    The ‘academic, professional or business credentials’ are the skills training ‘community practitioners’ need to navigate through that thick oily goo on the national and international scene.

    You certainly can’t have politics without community practitioners but all such practitioners need not be professionals surely…but it helps tremendously!

    All that said the cynic in me says that lawyers in particular gravitate to politics simply to build their practice… what better free advertisement is there than being introduced to all those potential ‘wills’, ‘real estate deals’, ‘new business incorporations’ or ‘personal injury claims’.

    That name recognition as Mastercard would say is ‘PRICELESS’.

    And of course the icing that makes that cake so delicious …the sweet government contracts.

    Which attorney after five long years of study would refuse that playbook for success.

    Like

  18. Jeff Cumberbatch April 23, 2017 at 9:52 AM #

    Point taken, DPD! The attraction between lawyers and politics may be mutual then?

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Well Well & Consequences Observing Blogger April 23, 2017 at 9:54 AM #

    Fruendel is an attorney……failure, he does not uphold the law and was also known as a mediocre lawyer when practicing….he should never have become prime minister.

    David Thompson….another lawyer, another law breaker who had no respect for the law, also known as a mediocre lawyer.

    Adriel Nitwit attorney general. …another lawyer, dont know anything anout the law, known as a mddiocre lawyer when he practiced, cannot fix the supreme court or anything else.

    Michael Carrington….Thiefer of the House….another lawyer and law breaker.

    We could go on all day….it’s not worth putting lawyers in positions of power, not this batch, maybe in another 2 generations.

    Like

  20. Bush Tea April 23, 2017 at 10:01 AM #

    The requirements for successful leadership are:
    — Genuine concern for others (a community-centric orientation).
    — Natural common sense and literacy (understanding decimals)
    — Balls (intestinal fortitude) and a lack of fear of confrontation
    — Wisdom

    The requirements of Bajan leadership are:
    – Popularity (be one of the brass bowl crowd)
    – Pretty talk (especially if funny – no need to be coherent)
    – Join a Lodge and/or kowtow to the (wicked) powers that be..
    – Avoid confrontation wherever possible.. and await your turn at the trough.

    Is it any wonder we are up shit street?

    Like

  21. Well Well & Consequences Observing Blogger April 23, 2017 at 10:05 AM #

    And when something goes wrong, another of their own cockups of their own making…..someone else always did it, it’s never their fault, the standard cry “dont blame me, it was he, she or they.”

    Like

  22. de pedantic Dribbler April 23, 2017 at 10:11 AM #

    @William at 9:24 AM re “…Just imagine a lawyer,wins a seat, becomes Minister of Education,
    walks into the ministry , summons an Education Officer … gives him a list of the…he or she wants to be considered to be principals.”

    I am sure you have heard the phrase ‘to the victor goes the spoils’.

    Of course that Minister is wrong and of course that’s why unions have fought so diligently to establish rules of seniority (coupled with qualification generally) and to fight hard against all forms of political preference, supercession and so on.

    Sadly that happens all too often…across all systems and all countries in some guise or other.

    re your 8:47 post.

    Wickham’s remarks are impractical. Good political representation is is all about people like Lashley.

    We would be crazy to believe that his type personal touch is passe.

    The financial strength and education of a voter will determine how much ‘touch and feel’ the politician needs to provide.

    Yet even a more ‘affluent, self sufficient’ St.James Central or South constituent will be just as impressed with programs and a narrative that speaks to their concerns as is the voter in the Pine….different though some of the deepest concerns may be.

    They all will appreciate their reps’ attention to detail and making contact to win their vote.

    And just as surely the representative will likely use completely different methods and tactics to achieve that objective of ‘personal contact’.

    Thus there is no way that a pollster who measures all types of granular details to help a candidate can seriously dismiss Hammie’s more personal style as ineffective or passe.

    Tell that to D. J. Trump. He got really deeply personal, didn’t he.

    …Graphs, statistics and polls offer a detailed yet broad view canvas …that is vital in modern politics.

    And successful politicians MUST then go forth and paint-in that picture…district by district region by region. And too have their acolytes etch-a-sketch sometimes house by house.

    Any political pollster who says otherwise has retired or is scamming the public.

    Wickham has not retired!

    Like

  23. David April 23, 2017 at 10:32 AM #

    On a tangential note if not related because it has to do with justice and representation -what is the latest with the Rodney Wilkinson case, a man who once sat on the right side of OSA?

    On Sun, Apr 23, 2017 at 2:11 PM, Barbados Underground wrote:

    >

    Like

  24. Vincent Haynes April 23, 2017 at 12:10 PM #

    Interesting line up on Brasstacks talking about privitisation with Stephens,Solutions,Innis andPrice as moderator.

    Bassa bassa over ISO already.

    Like

  25. David April 23, 2017 at 12:22 PM #

    @Vincent

    Clearly Ms.Undecided is being coached?

    Like

  26. Vincent Haynes April 23, 2017 at 12:44 PM #

    David

    Yup….from day one.

    Like

  27. Sam Clarke April 23, 2017 at 12:59 PM #

    This is terrible, truly terrible, just as a matter of basic prose style. It’s like watching a cat take her first steps into snow, every step uncertain and slow and unsettled. Doubtless its readers will be gagging to get on board with it, and send countless responses to it, but in the place where I was educated it would not have have merited the most minimal credential. Above all, it’s desperately boring.

    Like

  28. John April 23, 2017 at 1:44 PM #

    With the minds of most Barbadians directed towards the upcoming general election campaign, ….

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    You honestly think any Bajan is thinking about elections except perhaps the ones who are candidates?!!!

    More fool you.

    Evolution suggests change for the better.

    This one will make you smile!!

    With the minds of most Barbadians directed towards the upcoming general election campaign,

    The Ape in the clip is the politician.

    We idiots have given him a gun!!

    Like

  29. Hants April 23, 2017 at 2:20 PM #

    In 1962 I was told that the three best ” options ” for a Kolij boy was Lawyer, Doctor or Priest.

    These were three of the most “honored” professions back then….

    Lawyers seemed to be the logical “choice” as politicians.

    Like

  30. Vincent Haynes April 23, 2017 at 2:37 PM #

    ………………….was Lawyer, Doctor or Priest.
    ……………………………………………

    All three are well represented in the new parties for the upcoming elections.

    Just look at Solutions and Bim on BU……and this one…..they all are doing the lords work.

    Williams says he was called by God to serve | Barbados Today
    Williams says he was called by God to serve
    The Democratic Labour Party (DLP’s) new City candidate Henderson Williams says he has been called by God to serve. “I stand here highly aware of the fact that there is no higher calling than to serve people, party and country. I am…
    barbadostoday.bb
    https://www.barbadostoday.bb/2017/04/23/williams-says-he-was-called-by-god-to-serve/

    Like

  31. Well Well & Consequences Observing Blogger April 23, 2017 at 3:02 PM #

    I hate when they do that…what about saying they are there to represent the best interests of the people and actually do it…, no one called them, call my ass…..steupss

    Ah bet all the thieve in DBLP said the same thing, now look at the economy.

    Like

  32. Tron April 23, 2017 at 4:42 PM #

    I have a big problem with legal eagles and quacks in Parliament. Both groups represent the enablers of the old plantation, which sells out the taxpayers to the happy few in their villas for 10 mio USD, 5 SUVs and private jets.

    The lawyers think that they can “plan” economic growth by enacting some statutes. They always fail since lawyers in Barbados and elsewhere follow the old Roman tradition: iudex non calculat. Lawyers also lack any training in economic thinking. Look at former socialism in Eastern Europe, look at Jamaica, look at Comrade Commissioner´s Venezuela: Planning an economy is an impossible task. Rather, the role of lawyers should be limited: to deliver the right legal framework for a free economy serving the common good.

    The quacks also fail to serve the country. Like lawyers, they hang at the nipple of the big state, sucking taxpayer´s money.

    We need a new generation of parlamentarians who are able to run a rum shop, at least … and more.

    Like

  33. enuff April 23, 2017 at 6:38 PM #

    ““He who is successful in managing a small enterprise, behold, I will make he ruler over great things.”

    Bushie that is the thinking of a simpleton, especially in Barbados where one just have to be of the right colour and connected.

    Like

  34. Bush Tea April 23, 2017 at 7:46 PM #

    @ Enuff
    Bushie that is the thinking of a simpleton, especially in Barbados where one just have to be of the right colour and connected.
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    We know that you support the multitasking of chicken farmers into Insurance supervision, but if you look at ANY serious business or other operation, you will find that they UNIVERSALLY require successful EXPERIENCE at a lower level …BEFORE hiring people to operate at a higher level.

    You and your ‘right colour and connected’ nepotism is the very ROOT of our demise.
    You know that too…
    …you just seeking to mek a bushman sin he damn soul…. 🙂

    Like

  35. David April 23, 2017 at 11:56 PM #

    Isn’t it time for acting Governor Cleviston Haynes to share the first quarter review with the public?

    Like

  36. CUP.Violet Beckles Plantation Deeds from 1926-2017 land tax bills and no Deeds,BLPand DLP Massive land Fruad and PONZI April 24, 2017 at 12:39 AM #

    Well Well & Consequences Observing Blogger April 23, 2017 at 9:54 AM #

    Fruendel is an attorney……failure, he does not uphold the law and was also known as a mediocre lawyer when practicing….he should never have become prime minister.

    David Thompson….another lawyer, another law breaker who had no respect for the law, also known as a mediocre lawyer.

    Adriel Nitwit attorney general. …another lawyer, dont know anything anout the law, known as a mddiocre lawyer when he practiced, cannot fix the supreme court or anything else.

    Michael Carrington….Thiefer of the House….another lawyer and law breaker.

    We could go on all day….it’s not worth putting lawyers in positions of power, not this batch, maybe in another 2 generations.@@@

    Love it, crooks liars scumbags No Bajan lawyer need run for office, let them hide out in the BAR, and get drunk on their way on being a Judge, the next level of a QCrook

    Like

  37. Milli Watt April 24, 2017 at 1:02 PM #

    I’ve been robbed twice, burgled three times and survived a home invasion once. In each case I have contributed to the financial enrichment of my fellow man. based on what I am reading that could qualify as enough to enter elective politics based on contribution alone.

    Like

  38. Hants April 26, 2017 at 12:22 PM #

    “At an individual level, the decision to go with renewables is a difficult decision and has therefore slowed the adoption of the technology”

    http://www.nationnews.com/nationnews/news/96025/-odds-favour-renewable-energy#sthash.6gjFpI6g.dpuf

    At the individual level…..people in Barbados buy a corolla for $118,000.

    I don have to read an spell fuh wunna.

    Like

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