Building a Strong Caribbean in 2017

Submitted by the Mahogany Coconut Group

Caribbean“What then is the future of the Caribbean?

Given its past history, the future of the Caribbean can only be meaningfully discussed in terms of the possibilities for the emergence of an identity of the Caribbean peoples. The whole history of the Caribbean so far can be viewed as a conspiracy to block the emergence of a Caribbean identity-in politics, in its institutions, in economics, in its culture and values. Viewed in its historical perspective, the future way forward for the peoples of the Caribbean must be one which would impel them to start making their own history, to be the subjects rather than the objects of history, to stop being the playthings of other people. In this respect, the Caribbean has so far been the “outsider” of the New World.” Eric Williams from Columbus to Castro page 504

“Once there is true integration among all units of the Caribbean (excluding Puerto Rico for reasons mentioned above), and once all vestiges of political, economic, cultural and psychological dependence and racism have been removed from the Caribbean, then and only then can the Caribbean takes its true place in Latin America and the New World and put an end to the international wars and inter-regional squabbles which, from Columbus to Castro, have marked the disposition of Adam’s will.” Eric Williams from Columbus to Castro page 515.

We at Mahogany Coconut are not overly pessimistic of the year in review. Suffice it to say that we expected the declining fortunes of the Caribbean region to continue. Our optimism springs from our deep belief, that the Caribbean people can and will eventually emerge from this period, triumphant and better equipped to face the new world economy. If we lose this optimism, we see no way forward.

2016 ends with all the economies in the region, fighting for survival and making efforts to hold their heads above water as the world economy, moves toward automation and increased technological efficiencies. We are at present incapable of widely influencing global trends and while we accept this major disadvantage, it should not lead us to despair and hopelessness. Having survived slavery and still n trying to remove and overcome the remnants of a colonial past, we should be aware that is due to our resilience that we have not been knocked out.

We must therefore utilize our profound ability to survive and look inward for solutions. While we respect those who spout isms and meticulously dissect our problems, we fear that sometimes, we lose sight of our historical mission which is to complete the liberation of the region from the past that continues to cause us psychological weakness. Unless we educate our youth about our historical journey and the importance of realizing that the struggle is not yet won, we would continue to look for solutions that are unworkable and problems that should really be molehills would continue to turn into mountains.

We therefore believe that the quotes at the beginning of this comment are instructive. Eric Williams and others have long identified our strengths and weaknesses. It is for us to recognize both and continue to build on the historical mission of One Caribbean Nation.

We wish all a very all the best for 2017 and thank you for your support. We especially wish our Barbados Underground family and all contributors to BU all the best going forward.

William Skinner Mahogany Coconut Group 12/31/16
Advertisements

Tags:

109 Comments on “Building a Strong Caribbean in 2017”

  1. Alvin Cummins January 4, 2017 at 11:43 PM #

    Charles Skeete,
    “…fighting wars in other countries.”.
    The wars they fought “in other countries” were anti-imperialist wars; against the Portuguese and their puppets in Angolsa, the South Africans in Namibia, The Imperialists and crooks in the Congo. Battles on behalf of Black people in Africa. They fought these battles with the assistance of Barbados, which provided refuelling facilities for the planes transporting Cuban troops, who shed their blood for the same black people. It was not to show off the might of the Cuban soldiers, or the airmen who showed their superiority over the South African Air Force by blasting them from the skies. It was to assist in the saving of Angola, and driving the South African Army from Namibia, and the freeing of Nelson Mandela. If these were not worthwhile and noble, endeavours tell me what were. Which Caribbean country other than Barbados provided assistance in those struggles? I repeat Cuba must be included in any strong Caribbean. Cuba has strength, not the other way around. No other Caribbean country can matchCuba in the area of Health Care and medical and scientific research or implementation, and so many other areas.

    Like

  2. William Skinner January 5, 2017 at 12:26 AM #

    It is blatantly untrue to say that Cuba was not interested in the Caribbean. Many of the leaders of the Caribbean were afraid to identify with the Revolution in Cuba. Fidel Castro was always very popular among Caribbean progressive thinkers. Castro always left the door opened for us but we were too busy trying to please the USA and to some degree the United Kingdom.
    As soon as we relieved ourselves of those fears , we became more appreciative of Cuba and that led to Cuba inviting us to send medical students and offered eye care and so on free of cost.
    Cuba assisted with development in Grenada by building the airport. Cuba has never refused to be our friends.
    Due to those who still fight for Caribbean unity, it is safe to say, that Cuba now enjoys very good relations with most of those countries that were once afraid to forge such relations.

    Like

  3. Sargeant January 5, 2017 at 1:08 AM #

    @Chad
    I want to emphasize that while we need political leaders who are smart and articulate, we also want them to be of high moral character
    ++++++++
    That a high bar you’ve set for the local pols, your man Trump falls well short of those attributes……

    Like

  4. William Skinner January 5, 2017 at 1:52 PM #

    Just heard on the news that all the special nurses that Jamaica is educating are ending up in the USA or Canada. They are recruited even before they graduate. In other words there is a shortage of nurses in Jamaica .
    Cuba will be sending some nurses to help out Jamaica. Some will also come from India.

    Like

  5. chad99999 January 5, 2017 at 4:29 PM #

    The more precise reporting is that

    “[University Hospital of the West Indies Chairman James Moss-Solomon] lamented the specialist nurse brain drain that, he said, continues to plague the island and noted its crippling effect on the UHWI’s operations. According to Moss-Solomon, half the batch of 24 specialist nurses trained each year [in Jamaica] are usually recruited by overseas companies before graduation.

    “We have doubled nursing training for specialist nurses in 2016 and before the course is completed 50 per cent of them are already employed. It does not matter how many millions of dollars we care to put up on a bonding system, the USA, Canada and the UK are quite happy to pay it off,” Moss-Solomon said.

    “So you may have loved ones there today whose [surgeries] have been cancelled, not through the fault of the hospital being unable to have an operating theatre and the necessary doctors, but because of a critical shortage of specialist nurses who are being poached by these countries every graduating class,” he told the meeting.

    But the UHWI chairman said he cannot blame the nurses, as they are seeking a better life for themselves and their families.”

    Obviously, it is NOT TRUE that “It does not matter how many millions of dollars we care to put up on a bonding system, the USA, Canada and the UK are quite happy to pay it off,”

    THAT IS TOTAL BS. UWI is trying to find plausible reasons for its own poor management of hospital operations.

    If you put bonds for nursing students high enough, Canada and the US will not be interested. They can get all the nurses they want from the Philippines.

    Like

  6. Bush Tea January 5, 2017 at 6:24 PM #

    @ Chad99999
    …not only that, but if there is a market for trained nurses, …and good expectation that a reasonable bond will be paid by developed countries, …and a pool of young people willing to emigrate …..
    How the hell can that be a ‘problem’ for a university? That seems to spell ‘opportunity’.

    What the hell….!!!
    If Jamaica needs 20 nurses, and the loss rate is 50%, then train 40….. and use the bond money to provide incentives for top performers to stay at home….

    Like

  7. Alvin Cummins January 6, 2017 at 7:32 AM #

    Bushy,
    An incentive is only that; an incentive. You cannot compel a person to stay in the country the offer and opportunities somewhere else are greater. They will go, and mu advice to all young people is Go. Experience life in other places and societies and widen your perspective.

    Like

  8. William Skinner January 6, 2017 at 7:50 AM #

    @ Bush Tea
    That is the reason we have to develop a Caribbean consciousness. Why we educate people and they must be taught to understand that their primary focus is to develop the region. That is why George Lamming and other progressive voices continue to push the Caribbean identity. We just cant be producing people who will rush off as soon as the highest bidder appears.
    Some may say that “ideologues’ are pushing the One Caribbean Agenda. Some of the pseudo intellectuals may want to impress with their regurgitation of little bits and pieces they have been fortunate to pick up over the years but reality is always despised by those who cannot understand simple facts.
    You will note that 60 years ago we were sending our citizens to the “mother country” to be trained as nurses. Today we are educating nurses who are being snapped up by big developed countries.
    I know for a fact that more than 30 years ago,students came from Namibia to be trained as nurse in Barbados. Right now we are short on medical staff and turning to China for personnel.
    It is futile to talk about reforming the public service or the economy while refusing to reform the education system that is supposed to develop the same people who will eventually manage the economy and the public service. Once more, we have opted to put the cart before the horse.
    They taught us cricket and we became better than them. Wake up people, Dump the pseudo intellectuals and pay more attention to the writings of Lloyd Best and George Lamming.

    Like

  9. Carl Moore January 6, 2017 at 8:35 AM #

    @ William
    That is the reason we have to develop a Caribbean consciousness. Why we educate people and they must be taught to understand that their primary focus is to develop the region…
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    What scene are you on…? Develop a Caribbean consciousness? …as in community-centric vision? …..Are you serious?

    Boss, our whole society is built around selfishly looking after ‘numero uno’. Like Alvin-the-idiot predictably interjected, ‘the young people should go where they can get the most money’. THAT is the primary focus taught by our ‘education’ system so it should be no surprise then that we have the problems that we have….

    Given the albino-centric nature that we have all inculcated, Bushie is saying that our best approach is to make the most of opportunities presented under the flawed foundation.

    In any case, it may not be a bad idea for some elements to emigrate….. One of the best things to happen to Barbados was Alvin going to Canada… and another was Chad99999 choosing to work for white people in North America …. instead of in Barbados. It is not hard to predict the kind of employee he would have been working for Baloney.

    Like

  10. chad99999 January 6, 2017 at 8:51 AM #

    Just to let you know,

    I met George Lamming in Austin, Texas. He was chasing a white girl I used to go out with, so she invited me to have dinner with them at a local restaurant.

    That little factoid is for William Skinner.

    Like

  11. William Skinner January 6, 2017 at 9:37 AM #

    @ Carl Moore,
    As you know many people had predicted that the Nation Newspaper would have failed because they said “black people” could not get anything work. You guys proved them wrong. Let us hope that some change will come. First step: identify ourselves!

    @chad99999,
    What on earth does that have to do with anything? You and Lamming having the same taste in women is a little bit TMI (Too Much Information ) fuh me boysie or is it boosie? I hope this is not fake news. LOL

    Like

  12. David January 6, 2017 at 9:43 AM #

    @William

    Are you sure that was Carl?

    Like

  13. William Skinner January 6, 2017 at 9:49 AM #

    @ David,
    Why are you asking me that ?

    Like

  14. Bush Tea January 6, 2017 at 10:21 AM #

    @ William
    Seems a simple question, one that should be asked of all public contributions – even when the person is standing in front of you- and their mouth is moving, you cannot know for sure who may be pulling their strings.
    The point is that each contribution is best taken on its logical and contextual merit …and any name attached below (or above) is best ignored.

    A pseudonym is therefore no different to any other handle.

    Even when the CB Governor speaks to the public, it is PATENTLY obvious that he is not being honest and forthright, …otherwise he would admit what we all have known now for years….

    ALL NEWS IS FALSE NEWS by default. The point is to analyse, dissect, evaluate and deduce for yourself. Unfortunately, this requires wisdom.

    If Carl is as smart as Ossie was, he probably understands….

    Like

  15. charles skeete January 7, 2017 at 4:55 AM #

    “No other Caribbean country can match Cuba in the area of Health Care and medical and scientific research or implementation, and so many other areas.”

    Maybe in scientific research but this has nothing to do with the revolution -Cuba was a leader in scientific research long before Batista or the Castro brothers came to power. The work since 1870 of Dr Carlos Finlay Cuban epidemiologist who was recognized as a pioneer in the research of yellow fever, determining that it was transmitted through mosquitoes is a case in point. Our health care system is just as good or better than Cuba’s Alvin take it from me.

    Like

  16. charles skeete January 7, 2017 at 5:22 AM #

    “William Skinner January 5, 2017 at 12:26 AM #

    It is blatantly untrue to say that Cuba was not interested in the Caribbean. Many of the leaders of the Caribbean were afraid to identify with the Revolution in Cuba. Fidel Castro was always very popular among Caribbean progressive thinkers. Castro always left the door opened for us but we were too busy trying to please the USA and to some degree the United Kingdom.
    As soon as we relieved ourselves of those fears , we became more appreciative of Cuba and that led to Cuba inviting us to send medical students and offered eye care and so on free of cost.
    Cuba assisted with development in Grenada by building the airport. Cuba has never refused to be our friends.
    Due to those who still fight for Caribbean unity, it is safe to say, that Cuba now enjoys very good relations with most of those countries that were once afraid to forge such relations.”

    Let us start out with the premise that your speculative views indeed happen to be factual.

    Who were these leaders that were afraid to identify with the Cuban revolution and what would be their purpose in identifying or not identifying with an unknown equation at that point in time. Apart from having heard that a lot of Barbadians sought employment in the sugar cane fields of Cuba eons ago, this volatile spanish speaking country in the Caribbean sea like Haiti and the Dominican Republic was of no interest to us or us to them either socially, economically or culturally. Moreover, except for Trinidad, Barbados, Jamaica and Guyana who were experimenting with internal self government all the other Caribbean countries were still under British rule and as such could not influence decisions externally since Britain was still responsible for foreign policy decisions. then around the time of the Castro led Cuban revolution, the Caribbean was battling with their own revolution fuelled with insularity which saw the demise of the experiment of Federal Government.
    Like you I could speculate and determine that the sending of medical students to Cuba and the offering of eye care was a means to an end but can factually say that theses gestures by Cuba only came when Cuba was abandoned by the Soviet Union and were in need of friends elsewhere.

    Like

  17. charles skeete January 7, 2017 at 5:40 AM #

    “Wake up people, Dump the pseudo intellectuals and pay more attention to the writings of Lloyd Best and George Lamming”

    I am trying very hard Skins to ignore your repeated attempts to glorify Mr Lammimg as this great icon who has made a significant contribution to Barbados and the Caribbean. Unfortunately, I can see no such evidence of such contribution identity or otherwise from this literary giant except for flowery speeches and walking about in Sandals with a stick wearing a bush jacket or those afro jacs Elombe used to sell for a lot of money in the Yoruba yard at Fontabelle. Is his literary work required reading in the schools of Barbados or the Caribbean? Has he ever been invited to sit on any University boards? Has he been allowed to serve on any boards dealing with education in Barbados and if not, why not?

    Like

  18. Bush Tea January 7, 2017 at 9:26 AM #

    @ charles skeete
    You argument about Cuba and scientific research does not hold water. The fact that early pioneers did excellent work does NOT diminish the current outstanding situation.
    Barbados did world class scientific research in sugar cane breeding in the early days too…. and where has that led us?
    The most outstanding and impressive aspect of Cuba’s health program is it’s association with social initiatives such as community sport, diet, and culture that are specifically targeted at prevention of chronic diseases such as diabetes and high blood pressure.
    It is the overall, systematic, pro-active national policies that are impressive…. and unmatched in most other places – certainly in Barbados where we encourage everyone to do KNOWN shiite ….and then expect the QEH to solve their health problems for free.

    Have to agree with you that we should focus more on those who are DOERS rather than TALKERS…like Lamming. It is relatively easy to walk around talking exotic shiite – especially in a brass bowl place where most of the people are clueless anyway. The real challenge is to effect positive CHANGE in one’s personal life, one’s community, and in the overall quality of life for everyone.
    In many ways, a fellow who starts a small community group that improves the lives of neighbourhood children and guides some of them to a productive careers, has made much more of a contribution than some big-talking ‘larmer’-who talks a lotta shiite and sits on the NIS and central bank boards doing shiite.

    Like

  19. David January 7, 2017 at 9:42 AM #

    @Bushie

    We have been as harsh as the others in our criticism of the ideologues; the thinkers. You will admit that we need thinkers to provoke action -doers?

    Like

  20. millertheanunnaki January 7, 2017 at 10:35 AM #

    @ Alvin Cummins January 4, 2017 at 11:43 PM
    “Which Caribbean country other than Barbados provided assistance in those struggles? I repeat Cuba must be included in any strong Caribbean. Cuba has strength, not the other way around. No other Caribbean country can matchCuba in the area of Health Care and medical and scientific research or implementation, and so many other areas.”

    Alvin, given your accredited status as the BU ‘know-it-all’ (after GP) in all things medical this question should be right up your “professional” street.

    Is it true to say that Cuban-trained doctors cannot practise ‘medicine’ in Barbados without jumping through a million and one hoops and deliberately designed obstacles placed in their way by the local medical mafia?

    If true, then it puts paid to your ‘dreamy’ claim that “no other Caribbean country can match Cuba in the area of Health Care and medical and scientific research or implementation..”.

    Why isn’t the political directorate (whose pretense of love for the Cuban people and respect for the long-established political and socio-economic relationships which go right back to the turn of the last Century) doing anything about it but finds it rather convenient to engage the services of Chinese personnel without similar vetting of their qualifications and competence to practise “Western-styled” medicine?

    Like

  21. Bush Tea January 7, 2017 at 10:45 AM #

    @ David
    There are few attributes more valuable than that of thinking…..
    But there is a big gulf between ‘thinkers’ and ‘talkers’….

    Thinkers are able to rationalise even the simple questions of life…. (the ones that confound the big-headed)…. They are able to guide us to safety with their wisdom, ability to communicate, even with the uninitiated, and to visualise a successful future.

    Talkers (think Dompey) read a lotta shiite books and seek to impress with grand references, big name concordances and fancy sounding words.

    You can’t beat a do-er.
    Everything speaks for itself…..
    …and they need not be inspired by any lofty speeches, merely by the community-centric desire to ‘love their neighbour as they love themselves’.

    Like

  22. Hal Austin January 7, 2017 at 10:52 AM #

    But Miller…Chinese quack doctors are practising in Barbados. Is thAt the yuan speaking …?

    Like

  23. Vincent Haynes January 7, 2017 at 11:03 AM #

    millertheanunnaki January 7, 2017 at 10:35 AM #

    Chuckle…….what you wasting time asking Alvin all these hard questions for,he will respond to easy ones but never to hard ones…….I have loads awaiting answers……

    Like

  24. William Skinner January 7, 2017 at 12:35 PM #

    @ charles skeete,
    I guess, in your way of thinking, if you are not given a seat on a “board” , you are not to be taken seriously. I guess that all those who spend their time on BU, who do not sit on boards, wear afro jacks and shirt jacks, and walk about with sticks are a useless bunch. All those on BU , who have not published books, that are being used in schools, should also be quickly dismissed.
    @ David,
    You seem to believe that your attempts to dismiss pro-One Caribbean persons as “ideologues’ strengthen your arguments. Good luck. It will take more than a word to undermine the simple fact that without a strong united Caribbean, our gains will continue to be small and very painful.
    @Bush Tea
    “In many ways, a fellow who starts a small community group that improves the lives of neighbourhood children and guides some of them to a productive careers, has made much more of a contribution than some big-talking ‘larmer’-who talks a lotta shiite and sits on the NIS and central bank boards doing shiite.” I agree one hundred percent.

    Please add to those “big talking lamers”, the pseudo-intellectuals , skilled in mumbo jumbo, who parade a lot of” stale news” and pretend that they are the fountain of knowledge and that anybody who opposes them is ignorant. They too are a threat to Caribbean unity.

    Like

  25. David January 7, 2017 at 2:10 PM #

    @William

    We all have our different views on the subject. We are for functional cooperation; a more pragmatic and realistic approach. This One Caribbean unity is pie in the sky stuff.

    Like

  26. William Skinner January 7, 2017 at 5:19 PM #

    @ David,
    ” We are for functional cooperation; a more pragmatic and realistic approach. This One Caribbean unity is pie in the sky stuff.”

    What you need to grasp is that functional cooperation is the first step. We already have functional cooperation in many formal and informal areas. It has already been firmly established that this can be enhanced by going to the next step of One Caribbean Nation. Of course, it will take visionary leaders and thinkers to continue on this path.
    Anybody who differs on this is really dealing in “pie- in- the sky”. Not realists who know that the next step is the only hope for true progress.
    If you think these islands can seriously influence the world by being scattered “independent” units, trying to avoid imperialistic obliteration by foreign super powers, you probably know something that progressive forces in the region have no idea of.
    For your information many said that CARIFTA could not work and that has evolved into CARICOM. Many said that we could never replace the privy council and we are on our way to doing that and at the very beginning independence was scorned by many.
    You see, you are on the wrong side of history – a side that always supposes that change is pie-in-the- sky until it happens.
    My dear friend, there are many who never saw a black president ever being elected in the USA, especially with a name like Barak Obama.
    We could not even see a Usain Bolt coming. Before Bolt nobody saw a Garfield Sobers coming and I could go on and on. So you can continue to call us :ideologues, dreamers, holders of false hope and all of those epithets that you find so useful.

    Like

  27. charles skeete January 7, 2017 at 5:59 PM #

    “Bush Tea January 7, 2017 at 9:26 AM #

    @ charles skeete
    You argument about Cuba and scientific research does not hold water. The fact that early pioneers did excellent work does NOT diminish the current outstanding situation.”

    Bushie I never sought to diminish neither Cuba’s outstanding contribution in scientific research neither past or present I am adamant that Cuba’s health care system is no better than ours. We have our faults and they have theirs. I will leave it there.

    Like

  28. charles skeete January 7, 2017 at 6:09 PM #

    “William Skinner January 7, 2017 at 12:35 PM #

    @ charles skeete,
    I guess, in your way of thinking, if you are not given a seat on a “board” , you are not to be taken seriously. I guess that all those who spend their time on BU, who do not sit on boards, wear afro jacks and shirt jacks, and walk about with sticks are a useless bunch. All those on BU , who have not published books, that are being used in schools, should also be quickly dismissed.”

    Definitely not and I do not know how you can draw that conclusion having read my submission in totality. I was speaking of persons with international recognition for their literary works like Mr Kamau Brathwathe and Mr George Lamming and Mr Austin Clarke if he can be placed in their category. Apart from having brought personal glory and adulation to themselves by publishing what some regard as outstanding literary works what contribution have they made to their island homes. Al right den. Let me play devil’s advocate. Do you believe that these revered literary giants have made a more outstanding contribution to Barbados than for example Gladstone Holder or Frank Collymore or Louis Lynch or William Rudder who were responsible if truth be told for moulding the minds of thousands of students enabling them to become productive citizens of Barbados.

    Like

  29. Gabriel January 7, 2017 at 6:24 PM #

    David
    A Federal form of government is an ideal but it will have to be forced upon Caricom.The big players,in particular the US,will determine when that will be done.Unless unity is mandatory crapeau smoke your pipe;it will remain a pipe dream.The Westminster model gave too much power and authority to one individual and not one of them want that changed.

    Like

  30. David January 7, 2017 at 9:00 PM #

    Do not split hairs William, it is about deepening functional cooperation. Of course it exist on some scale already. Do we have a common airspace? Do we share resources in foreign countries as far as diplomatic missions go? Do we market as a common tourist destination? This is the kind of functional cooperation that will allow us to maximize resources. These small islands will always prefer to be big fishes in a small pond.

    Like

  31. William Skinner January 7, 2017 at 11:38 PM #

    @ charles skeete,

    “Do you believe that these revered literary giants have made a more outstanding contribution to Barbados than for example Gladstone Holder or Frank Collymore or Louis Lynch or William Rudder who were responsible if truth be told for moulding the minds of thousands of students enabling them to become productive citizens of Barbados.”

    Collymore influenced Lamming and i know that Lamming has influenced others as well. Lynch Rudder etc all influenced us as well. Lamming’s success along with Tom Clarke’s have influenced countless Barbadian writers and cultural workers. Holder was a great teacher and he also influenced us. I really don’t know what you are using to gauge their individual influences on others. They have all contributed.

    Like

  32. William Skinner January 7, 2017 at 11:41 PM #

    @ David,

    “Do we have a common airspace? Do we share resources in foreign countries as far as diplomatic missions go? Do we market as a common tourist destination? This is the kind of functional cooperation that will allow us to maximize resources.”
    The above is exactly why we need One Caribbean Nation.

    Like

  33. charles skeete January 8, 2017 at 4:08 AM #

    “Lamming’s success along with Tom Clarke’s have influenced countless Barbadian writers and cultural workers.”

    Obviously they would have influenced or should i say impressed one or two people like yourself but “countless” no way; not in my lifetime and I am in the departure lounge.

    Like

  34. Bush Tea January 8, 2017 at 7:50 AM #

    Dompey very likely has influenced some people too….

    Such general arguments are not helpful. If we want to speak objectively about the successful performance of persons or organisations, then some more specific performance criteria would need to be defined.
    Anyone who thinks that the Barbados health care system is on par with Cuba’s, certainly have their criteria confused.
    Better how…?
    ..More efficient amputations?
    ..More comfortable waiting arrangements?
    ..Better for private doctors who utilise state facilities for private work?
    ..Better at enticing assistance from foreign nurses and doctors from Africa and China?

    Would you not think that the ability to respond on a grand scale to assist others in medical crises should be a criterion for performance? – but then,… that is community-centric thinking.

    Albino-centric thinking leads us to think that ACQUIRING cheap labour from outsiders is a major asset.

    Don’t you think that preventative strategies to keep citizens healthy is a MUCH more advanced methodology to be employed by government – rather than looking to fund REACTIVE strategies like free drugs and quick amputations?

    Cuba has employed some community-centric social policies that no doubt pisses the albino fans off…..
    — Things like very flat salary structures – where state educated professionals don’t get to lord it over those who paid to put them there…
    … Things like health care that does not depend on your social and financial status
    Those kinds of policies go against the instincts of many – and no doubt such persons will run off to Miami, …or think that the policies are flawed.

    Oil and water do not mix….. nor do community-centric and albino-centric leanings.

    Like

Join in the discussion, you never know how expressing your view may make a difference.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: