The Jeff Cumberbatch Column – The Contractor General [I]

Jeff Cumberbatch - Columnist, Barbados Advocate

Jeff Cumberbatch – Columnist, Barbados Advocate

“Section 15 permits the Contractor General to undertake an investigation on his own initiative or as a result of representations made to him…” _per Campbell J in Minister of Transport. Works & Housing v The Contractor General (2013)

The issue as to whether those MPs who were summoned to appear before the Public Accounts Committee of Parliament [PAC] are legally obliged to do so is already sub judice, it would appear, so that any detailed commentary on that nice point of law is foreclosed, but a cursory reading of the relevant legislation does make for interesting reading.

According to section 11 of the Public Accounts Committee Act, Cap 10A of the Laws of Barbados-

The Committee may summon a person to appear before it to give evidence and produce documents.

This is clear enough, but the recourse of the PAC, should there be a failure to appear, is not. First, section 14 stipulates:

“Where a person upon whom a summons under section 11 has been served fails to appear or, having appeared, fails to continue in attendance in obedience to the summons, the Chairman or the Deputy Chairman shall report the matter to the House and the House may order the person to attend the Committee. [Emphasis added]

And then follows section 15 is to the effect that “A person upon whom a summons under section 11 has been served shall not, without reasonable excuse, proof whereof shall lie upon him, fail to appear or to continue in attendance in obedience to the summons”.

However, section 21 of the Act, the section that creates the offence of failing to appear when summoned, reads as follows –“A person who contravenes, or fails to comply with, section 15, 16, 17 or 19(2) of this Act is guilty of an offence and is liable, on summary conviction, to a fine of $25 000 or to imprisonment for a term of 2 years or to both”.

An ordinary reading of the legislation would suggest therefore that the choice of whether to pursue the matter by criminal sanction under section 21 or by parliamentary sanction under section 14 is left up to the Committee, although essential constitutional principle would naturally lead to the submission that as a committee of Parliament, any contempt of the Committee should be principally punishable by the parent body (Parliament) rather than by the ordinary courts.

The legitimacy of the PAC is founded in Standing Order 59 of the Standing Orders of Parliament that in turn gains constitutional authority from section 50 of the Constitution. According to this: “Subject to the provisions of this Constitution, each House may regulate its own procedure and for this purpose may make Standing Orders.

Given its charter effectively to oversee the management of the public moneys of Barbados, there can be little doubt that the PAC is an important cog in the wheel of good governance. At the same time, the failure of the Committee over time to produce any significant solutions in this area makes it out, with respect, to be an ineffectual body insofar as its remit is concerned. It is therefore easy to agree with Wednesday’s leader in another section of the press that “there is an absolute need for a strong watchdog body of the PAC type” [since] “so long as the current system continues, the country’s ability to hold responsible those it entrusts with the management of national affairs will remain weak and ineffective”.

As the recent Brexit judgment in the English High Court demonstrates, Parliament is regarded under English law as the supreme body where oversight of the citizen’s constitutional entitlements is concerned. The position is no less true in Barbados, although to some extent the power of Parliament in these parts is “cribbed, cabined and confined” by constitutional restriction.

One should therefore be leery of limiting Parliamentary oversight with regard to the public finances, but we do not accept the proposal of the editorial referred to earlier that a reconstituted PAC might better serve the country “if the majority of members came from the Opposition”. While this is likely to ensure that the body is quorate on most occasions, the nature of partisanship in Barbados is such that an unwilling Government who will be in the parliamentary majority by definition in any event, could frustrate the findings of any such constituted PAC simply by refusing to support its recommendations.

We need not look too far for an alternative. In Jamaica, the role of watchdog of Government contracting, from the award to payment for performance is monitored and regulated by a Commission of Parliament known as the Contractor General. And even though the relevant Act provides that the Commission shall consist of such person or persons as shall be appointed by the Governor General…after consultation with the Prime Minister and the Leader of the Opposition and that any person so appointed shall be known as a Contractor General, the recent tradition has been to appoint a single individual to the post; two of the more recent being both former Jamaican colleagues from the Faculty of Law in the persons of Mr. Greg Christie and Mr. Derek McKoy.

The proposal that there might be a local Contractor General is not a new one by any means. I seem to recall the late Dr Richie Haynes, then leader of the National Democratic Party, making such a call and there have been others since. The functions of the Contractor General are inter alia, (i) to monitor the award and the implementation of government contracts with a view to ensuring that- such contracts are awarded impartially and on merit; the circumstances in which each contract is awarded or, as the case may be, terminated, do not involve impropriety or irregularity; and without prejudice to the functions of any public body in relation to any contract, the implementation of each such contract conforms to the terms thereof; to be advised of the award and where applicable the variation of any government contract by the public body responsible for such contract; (ii) to have access to all books, records, documents or other property used in connection with the grant issue suspension or revocation of any prescribed licence whether in the possession of any public officer or any other person; and (iii) to have access to any premises or location where work on a government contract has been is being or is to be carried out.

I propose to continue this discussion next week, God willing, by examining the independence of the Contractor General, the statutory scope of his or her investigations and related offences by individuals who seek to frustrate the work of the Contractor General. Space permitting, I shall also examine a case where an order for Judicial review in the form of remedies for certiorari and prohibition was sought by a Government Ministry against the Contractor General in respect of the exercise of its functions.

To be continued….

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47 Comments on “The Jeff Cumberbatch Column – The Contractor General [I]”

  1. Hal Austin December 11, 2016 at 6:57 AM #

    Jeff,
    I beg to differ. An action can only be sub judice if it is likely to go to trial by jury; the theory being members of the jury may be influenced by prejudicial reporting.
    But, as you know, if a case is to be tried by judges (or in this case members of parliament) then they will not be influenced.
    So, we can have a full debate. Think Brexit.

    Like

  2. Pachamama December 11, 2016 at 7:08 AM #

    All of these legalisms seem to leave us in the position ante.

    To us, these are no more than games, not supporting the peoples’ rights, but in defense of the establishment.

    Indeed, the increasing layers of law – contractor general, PAC – and which has authority or not, the point remains that the authority of the dictator-in-chief supersedes all.

    Meaning, that there can be few circumstances in Barbados where belated efforts for accountability, regardless of need, cannot be scuttled by a PM.

    Certainly, since the new contractor general legislation we have hardly seen any attempts to make flesh.

    Regardless to what this relatively new law says, the passage of time, the culture of ‘governance’, will and has revealed that status quo will eventually prevail.

    That is the practical matter.

    As a theoretical matter, people like Jeff will be made to engage this matter as if it really means something real.

    Like

  3. lemuel December 11, 2016 at 7:29 AM #

    To be true, the role of the contractor general is wrapped up with good intentions. The problem lies in the ability of the “forces” that be to “allow” true independence of the process. Friends and family are still too close to the hearts of those who “run” this country!!!

    Like

  4. Bush Tea December 11, 2016 at 7:58 AM #

    I propose to continue this discussion next week, God willing,…
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Which God…?
    The one with the monument at the Garrison, just up the road from Parliament….?
    ….or do you actually know of another one…?

    The basic problem here is the inherent crooked and nefarious nature of practically EVERY SINGLE person who calls themselves a ‘lawyer’ in Barbados.
    Copying Jamaican Law is no damn answer….
    …just as copying British traditions have provided none.

    Unless you can somehow CHANGE the QUALITY and nature of the people that you have been foisting on this country as ‘lawyers’, our goose is cooked…..

    …and clearly you do not know how to achieve such a change…..

    Bushie can almost guarantee that your ‘God’ will allow you to continue next week… as we continue to be bamboozled and led to destruction by his servants and advocates of the ‘law’..

    Again, well said Pacha….

    Like

  5. charles skeete December 11, 2016 at 8:38 AM #

    This contractor -General debate in my view is making a mountain out of a molehill and I still at a loss as to what a Contractor-General would be able to achieve in making contract awards more transparent that is not adequately addressed and provided for in part X11 in the Financial Administration and Audit (Financial) Rules1971 Sections 124 -152 and it is my view that if Mr Haynes had familiarised himself with the Rules he would have advocated for giving the Tenders Committee more independence by amending Section 129(1) c which gives the Minister the power to appoint five persons to the Committee out of the composition of seven.

    Like

  6. Jeff Cumberbatch December 11, 2016 at 8:50 AM #

    @ Bush Tea

    “Which God…?
    The one with the monument at the Garrison, just up the road from Parliament….?
    ….or do you actually know of another one…?”

    We each have created our own, Sir. May you walk always with yours as I will with mine.

    “Again, well said Pacha….”

    Perhaps then you cam tell me what he said since, perhaps owing to my limitations, i I did not understand.

    “Bushie can almost guarantee that your ‘God’ will allow you to continue next week… ”

    You really think a lot of yourself don’t you? Making near-guarantees for God now? Wow!!!

    Like

  7. Vincent Haynes December 11, 2016 at 8:55 AM #

    One could sum up the above article simply by saying that the political class has instituted ambivalent rules making its function ineffective in order to protect itself from itself,in the event of a rogue operative attempting to do other than maintain the status quo.

    Like

  8. Well Well & Consequences December 11, 2016 at 9:11 AM #

    Exactly, ss long as ALL the government ministers remain crooked, bribetaking and corrupt, ya can have 20 contractor generals, as long as they are offered bribes, by Bizzy and all the other known bribers and parasites…they will find a way around the contractor general…and ALL the known crooked, unethical lawyers like Hal Gollop will help them rob the taxpayers.

    Like

  9. millertheanunnaki December 11, 2016 at 9:21 AM #

    @ charles skeete December 11, 2016 at 8:38 AM
    “This contractor -General debate in my view is making a mountain out of a molehill and I still at a loss as to what a Contractor-General would be able to achieve in making contract awards more transparent that is not adequately addressed and provided for in part X11 in the Financial Administration and Audit (Financial) Rules1971 Sections 124 -152 and it is my view that if Mr Haynes had familiarised himself with the Rules he would have advocated for giving the Tenders Committee more independence by amending Section 129(1) c which gives the Minister the power to appoint five persons to the Committee out of the composition of seven.”

    Balance, you have beaten me to it. Sometimes the brain works much faster than the pen can keep pace with.

    Before Jeff can speak about any contractor-general legislation he has to point out the deficiencies, if any, in the existing legislation which covers the award of contracts and the subsequent accounting for those contracts.

    The existing legislation does not provide for any role for politically elected officials other than the setting of policy.

    It seems rather strange that the PAC is summonsing ministers of the Crown and not the servants of the Crown responsible for exercising the provisions of the legislation regarding the award of contracts and subsequent accounting for those contracts.

    Be that as it may, the question still has to be raised about the effectiveness of any legislation without the necessary FOI and ITAL in place.

    Like

  10. Dompey December 11, 2016 at 9:43 AM #

    Well Well

    You cannot established any kind of a public office devoid of some form of sustainable transparency -which militates against improprieties and irregularities that is conducive to human proclivity towards corruption.

    Furthermore, you have to ask yourself the fundamental question: why was government instituted in the first place? And the answer to that question is because the passions and desires of men would not conform to the dictates of reason and justice devoid of some kind of sustainable constraints.

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  11. Jeff Cumberbatch December 11, 2016 at 9:45 AM #

    @Hal Austin@6:57

    Hal, the rule is much broader than you think. –

    “A breach of the sub judice rule can include, for instance, statements urging the court to reach a particular result in a matter, comments on the strength or weakness of a party’s case or particular issue, or comments on witnesses or evidence in a case”.

    And mine is not a mere lay opinion that might safely and easily be ignored.

    Like

  12. millertheanunnaki December 11, 2016 at 9:48 AM #

    @ Jeff Cumberbatch December 11, 2016 at 8:50 AM
    “We each have created our own, Sir. May you walk always with yours as I will with mine.”

    At least you have ceded to the ‘fact’ that there are many gods.
    So many gods and just one devil.

    It seems the (D)evil is indeed the Supreme God. Just let us call Him Zeus or Jupiter in keeping with your Greco-Roman exposure.

    One thing is certain. You will never find a politician sitting next to any god as long as it is a sin to tell lies, steal and fornicate. Neither would you find a contractor-general.

    By Jove! (Or should that be Indra??)

    Like

  13. Bush Tea December 11, 2016 at 10:12 AM #

    @ Jeff
    You really think a lot of yourself don’t you? Making near-guarantees for God now? Wow!!!
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Those statements do not logically follow one from another – as you well know.

    Bushie is able to make, not only ‘near’, but also ‘absolute’ guarantees for God in many areas, …but this has nothing at all to do with what the Bushman thinks of himself.
    Of much more import, is what Bushie knows, and thinks, of his adopted family.

    Stinking Bushie is just another brass bowl …. but for a lucky adoption.

    BTW
    Bushie also thinks a lot of you….
    You are lucky to have the kind of physical brain that puts you in a special position to rationalise fact from friction, and foolishness from reality.
    That you should choose to constrain yourself to the confines of (what you must clearly see as) flawed, ineffectual law is an unfortunate handcuff that you have allowed to remain on your mind.

    What Pacha said was that the problems go way beyond the multiple layers of laws and lawyers that have been applied to the ‘wounds’ of public stealing by politicians and public servants.
    Your proposed Contractor General is just another balm that kicks the ball down the road. You know this better than anyone else on this blog, yet you float it like a law-school case study.

    You must know that we are past those schoolboy games here on BU… The time is too short.

    Like

  14. David December 11, 2016 at 10:25 AM #

    Time for a Contractor General, Barbados

    Submitted by Old Onion Bags

    Greg Christie was appointed Jamaica’s fourth Contractor General in 2005

    The call has been made umpty times now on BU for Barbados to have a Contractor General. For those wondering what are the duties of such a noble sounding  executive officer, in a nutshell….”to assist government in the fair advertising, soliciting, and final disbursements of contracts for services and purchase of major worth.” More detailed….

    The Contractor General is given the onus to monitor the award and the implementation of government contracts with a view to ensuring that —

    1. such contracts are awarded impartially and on merit;
    2. the circumstances in which each contract is awarded or, as the case may be, terminated, do not involve impropriety or irregularity;
    3. without prejudice to the functions of any public body in relation to any contract, the implementation of each such contract conforms to the terms thereof; and
    4. to monitor the grant, issue, suspension or revocation of any prescribed licence, with a view to ensuring that the circumstances of such grant, issue, suspension or revocation do not involve impropriety or irregularity and, where appropriate, to examine whether such licence is used in accordance with the terms and conditions thereof.  (Courtesy Jamaica’s Office of Contractor General).

    If we in Barbados are serious about stamping out all forms of pandering and corruption gotten via contract negotiations by governmental officials, the office of Contractor General needs to be legislated and functioning as soon as possible. Such will assist in highlighting transparency in all governmental contract dealings and will go hand in hand with our proposed Integrity Legislation Act.

    Consider for more details this link. Time for showing we are serious about going forward, is present and awaits the true Sir Lancelot. Will they step up to the plate?

    https://barbadosunderground.wordpress.com/2012/09/22/time-for-a-contractor-general-barbados/

    Like

  15. Dompey December 11, 2016 at 10:28 AM #

    Miller

    “One thing is certain. you would never find a politician sitting next to a god as long it is a sin to tell lies, steal and fornicate”

    And the same can be said for a law enforcement office and many other public offices of trust, so in essence, it inconceivable to concluded that every person who seek public office whether politician or police, were corrupted prior to seeking such office.

    But it is reasonable to concluded that the culture of such office or offices fuels the corruption we often witness in the contemporary public offices.

    So the fundamental problem regarding the corruption we witness in the political affairs of today, stems from the want of or lack thereof, the effective and efficient checks and balances.

    Like

  16. Exclaimer December 11, 2016 at 10:47 AM #

    “Church collapses in Uyo, killing dozens of Nigerians
    At least 60 people killed after church roof came crashing down on worshippers in southern city of Uyo, officials say.”

    http://www.aljazeera.com/news/2016/12/church-collapses-nigeria-uyo-killing-scores-161211041437146.html

    Like

  17. David December 11, 2016 at 11:51 AM #

    The bottomline is this: does the Auditor General’s office have the legal support in law to force compliance with audit notes?

    If no what can we do to beef up his office. If this is not possible what are the options we can take as a cauntry based on best practice.

    Like

  18. Dompey December 11, 2016 at 12:27 PM #

    David

    Perhaps, I am simple minded or lack the necessary understanding by asking this question with respect to the Contractor General’s legal authory: but shouldn’t there be a set criteria by which the Contractor General is to acess whether or not for example: how a contract is awarded with fairness and honesty? Now having that authority at his/her disposal, why would he/she need the backing of the law?

    Like

  19. Gabriel December 11, 2016 at 12:35 PM #

    I don’t trust these politicians.When in opposition they come up with lots of hairbrained ideas and when in government seek to frustrate the resolution of blatant misfeasance.
    John Boyce says the BLP causes him to break the speed limit when he passes the Al Barack building.In former says Cyrus would be waiting on his donkey.Today he gets away with misleading the public by being parsimonious with the truth.We know that the Al Barack matter was on Appeal when you morons walked up parliament steps.The ball has been in your court ever since.You even signed up Barack as a DLP member..
    What would stop the DLP from appointing Kellman or worse yet Lowe,as contractor general at some future date.

    Like

  20. peterlawrencethompson December 11, 2016 at 12:58 PM #

    @David asked “does the Auditor General’s office have the legal support in law to force compliance with audit notes?”

    The answer appears to be a resounding no. The PAC is the only vehicle with which to purse compliance, and it has not only run out of gas in recent years, more to the point, it is designed with no starting motor: “the Chairman or the Deputy Chairman shall report the matter to the House and the House may order the person to attend the Committee.” The governing Party, in control of the House, will undoubtedly sabotage any attempt by the PAC to investigate any malfeasance. It gets worse, the PAC has no wheels even if it could get its motor started by some miracle, because: “the choice of whether to pursue the matter by criminal sanction […] is left up to the Committee, although […] as a committee of Parliament, any contempt of the Committee should be principally punishable by the parent body (Parliament) rather than by the ordinary courts.”

    Like

  21. Vincent Haynes December 11, 2016 at 1:02 PM #

    David December 11, 2016 at 11:51 AM #

    No….and no the political class will not beef it up……..the reason….see my above post.

    Like

  22. Jeff Cumberbatch December 11, 2016 at 1:06 PM #

    “What would stop the DLP from appointing Kellman or worse yet Lowe,as contractor general at some future date.[?]

    What indeed would stop either party from appointing DingDing as Contractor General, Attorney General, or even Governor General?

    Like

  23. Gabriel December 11, 2016 at 1:23 PM #

    Jeff
    The Trump post election debacle is a case in point.We will see where that goes with all the stories and intrigue.At a minimum the USA seem to have legal recourse.We wait with baited breath on our law makers to do the right thing and account for their action or inaction.

    Like

  24. David December 11, 2016 at 1:24 PM #

    A crisis of governance?

    It is a sad commentary if we cannot trust our public officials. A trust given its timbre by robust recourse by the public they serve.

    Like

  25. Hants December 11, 2016 at 1:27 PM #

    What if the “Contractor General” is generally an intelligent well educated crook?

    Like

  26. David December 11, 2016 at 1:31 PM #

    @Hants

    The key (maybe) is to support a contractor general position with relevant legislation. In other words he reports to an independent committee. The challenge we have in Barbados is that all public officials are appointed by the executive or heavily influenced by it. Any system -it does not matter how well designed- must have people of integrity doing the job.

    Like

  27. Hants December 11, 2016 at 1:33 PM #

    @ David who wrote “It is a sad commentary if we cannot trust our public officials.”

    They are human and some will tief.

    Like

  28. Hants December 11, 2016 at 1:35 PM #

    @ David who wrote “must have people of integrity doing the job.”

    Agreed. You know any and if so how many ?

    Like

  29. Dompey December 11, 2016 at 2:30 PM #

    David

    Any system must have people of integrity lol!

    What has integrity to do with man’s faults and failings?
    What has integrity to do with man’s passions and desires?
    What has integrity to do with man’s self-interest over the collective-interest?

    Listen! Irrespective of man’s integrity-which he often abandons when he is tempted by the corruptive forces of the given culture of the work environment, there ought, must and should be the effective checks and balances to whole such integrity in place.

    Like

  30. Bush Tea December 11, 2016 at 3:20 PM #

    @ Hants
    What if the “Contractor General” is generally an intelligent well educated crook?
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Yuh mean like “what if they appoint a lawyer”…?!

    Like

  31. Hal Austin December 11, 2016 at 4:11 PM #

    @ Jeff 9.45am

    Precisely, Jeff. The point is to influence the judgement. Judges sitting alone are presumed to be above influence. Their professional objectivity determines the outcomes, not noise from rabblerousers.
    As you know, contempt also covers the veracity of evidence given under oath. I gave the example of Hector Sants. Hansard must be as accurate as possible.

    Like

  32. Well Well & Consequences December 11, 2016 at 5:07 PM #

    Domoey….you mean to lock them to hell up, cause at the end of the day, that’s the only remedy, most of the ministers, politicians, lawyers want locking up, naming and shaming worldwide for their disgusting, deplorable behaviors of stealing from taxpayers, using the law and lawyers as a shield.

    Like

  33. Dompey December 11, 2016 at 7:24 PM #

    Hall Austin

    There is concept in American jurisprudence called the Supremacy of Law, and what that essentially entails is that: no one is above or below the law; the law applies to all equally. But we are cognizant of the fact that this doesn’t always rings truth because of the human element.

    Like

  34. David December 12, 2016 at 12:41 AM #

    Like

  35. Hants December 12, 2016 at 1:51 AM #

    Another political brass meeting. The only thing missing was comedic content in their shouting .

    Hopefully the DLP will hold a meeting soon play some soca and crack jokes.

    Like

  36. Vincent Haynes December 12, 2016 at 8:58 AM #

    Ghana’s President-elect Nana Akufo-Addo tells the BBC that a special prosecutor’s office will be set up to fight corruption, as he did not want to give the impression that he is carrying out a “witch-hunt” against his opponents http://bbc.in/2gQFWxb

    Like

  37. Pachamama December 12, 2016 at 9:11 AM #

    @ Vincent Haynes

    We happen to have an interest in Ghana.

    It has always been the same, in recent centuries.

    It will always be the same.

    The corrupt people move from side to side seamlessly

    In fact, because there are new and hungrier politicians on the block, corruption is more likely to increase, like in the past.

    Does this not sound like Bim

    It’s the same everywhere.

    Any politician promising to bring an end to corruption is worthy of a shot in the face.

    The country will have to be shut down or destroyed first.

    Corruption is part of the fabric of western led countries

    And like Mr. Harding it can’t burn.

    And we know that David like talking about TI.

    Well, they are as political, as the UN et al.

    Like

  38. Vincent Haynes December 12, 2016 at 9:19 AM #

    Pachamama December 12, 2016 at 9:11 AM #

    Our PM spoke true words when he said in parliament that they collectively are the Political class and that will suggest that they will protect each other as highlighted by Jeff in his post on the inconsistent laws governing the PAC.

    Like

  39. Hal Austin December 12, 2016 at 10:29 AM #

    Some Caribbean journalists are now on a freebie to Israel. Under Britain’s Anti-Bribery Act, this would have been illegal. As editor, even if one of my reporters had lunch with a contact it had to be reported.
    Bad form.

    Like

  40. Pachamama December 12, 2016 at 8:07 PM #

    Yuh know we have some ‘technicians’ who were well mis-educated.

    And although all of there systems are leading us to perdition people are still insistent that theirs must be the way, the truth and the light.

    So the furnaces which smelted these people continue, with no way to avoid the trouble which is burning like hell for the all of us.

    Of all the technicians, we have to single out the lawyers for their sophistication in creating legal merry-go-arounds which appear attractive, capable of out the fire, but just fuels our demise as a species.

    Like

  41. Gabriel December 12, 2016 at 9:04 PM #

    I am fed up with all these big up legal beagles wishing,hoping for this and for that.The Chief Justice is wishing and hoping but doing nothing we can see to manage the justice system and make it more efficient.The Attorney General is wishing and hoping but doing nothing to put some teeth into our laws to make the words “let justice be done though the heavens fall”.
    The UN champion for the Child is wishing and hoping that Justice be done in some of the cases before the Barbados Court system citing one that involves a 3 year old who is now 11.
    Barbados is one sick ass place.If these big ups cannot get action,who can or who will.

    Like

  42. William Skinner December 13, 2016 at 12:20 AM #

    May I ask a simple question: What is the real purpose of the Criminal Investigation Department?

    Like

  43. Hal Austin December 13, 2016 at 3:05 AM #

    “furnaces which smelted people”, this is Nazism, this is not funny. We have a sick aand demented mind amongst us. What are the police waiting for, furnaces in Barbados?

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  44. Pachamama December 14, 2016 at 5:52 AM #

    Poetic license, you IDIOT

    They are the furnaces which smelt the current people in charge.

    The schools, the political parties, the other social systems. Yuh brassbowl

    And your thinking is an example of such.

    Can you only think in terms of 1945 and Hitler’s Germany

    That is distinctively a Eurocentric mindset

    Of those alleged furnaces, we have no defenses.

    Like

  45. Hal Austin December 14, 2016 at 6:31 AM #

    I have already concluded that you are a mentally deranged nutcase, but 70 years after the Second World War to talk of furnaces and smelting people cannot be poetic licence. It is the licence of mentally deranged social vermin incapable of thinking and walking.

    Like

  46. Pachamama December 14, 2016 at 9:01 AM #

    The events around WW2 have a certain resonance with you and your people.

    Those events cannot be made to define us and we see them as no point of departure.

    You were smelted in a furnace of ignorance. Those furnaces are much worst than the ones you find solace in referencing. Indeed, it is the lackeys like you who have caused all the social problems we currently have.

    Hitler would have described you as the vermin you are.

    Your ignorance demands a singular understanding about the one language you pretend to master.

    You pretend to dislike our wordsmithing, We don’t have to go back to 1945. Your masters have created a Hitler like furnace in Syria currently. Where the people you adore, and strive to be always like, are killing 500K-plus people and blaming it on somebody else. All this time allied with terrorists.

    On those furnaces there could never be a sensible comment from you.

    What an ugly, ignorant, stinking brassbowl.

    We have no desire to protect the likes of you.

    And if you most fear furnaces we recommend them instead of guillotines.

    Like

  47. Alvin Cummins December 17, 2016 at 4:43 PM #

    Pacha,
    What do you really want as a society? What type of government would you really like? Do you want a dictatorship, or do you want a democracy? If you want a Democracy,; run and governed by laws, rules and regulations, then you have to adhere to those rules and regulations, and seek the remedies as dictated by those laws rules and regulations. History, and the lessons taught, and to be learned by it, have to be understood for the proper governance of our lives. You need to learn about past history and its application to today’s world. If the citizens of the U.S.A. who voted for Donald Trump were familiar with history; like the history of the Second World War; or even the first world war-especially its genesis, and the rise of Hitler-they would never have voted for The Donald. But I guess many of them were like you. Your knowledge of Ghana, and indeed, Africa in general, leaves a lot to be desired.
    Gabriel:
    “We know that the Al Barack matter was on Appeal when you morons walked up parliament steps.”
    It was on appeal, because the BLP refused to accept the findings of the Arbitrator-which they had promised to do and left the incoming government with that hot pot-potato,, and because interest had reached the level it had, Barack refused to accept the terms that were proposed to him, and tried to lock out Government employees from using the building. See the level it has reached now!
    By the way, all these lawyers, politicians, and people about whom you make such negative comments and degrading remarks, are our own children, friends of our children, and Barbadians who grew up and were educated by this society. They are your sons and daughters, your friends, and people among whom you grew up. They have been made-by you- to be victims of vicious rumour and innuendo, and your masochistic minds seek only to denigrate your own country and your own people. Why?

    Like

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