referendum

POLITICS OF INCLUSION, a step in the right direction.

Submitted by nineofnine

grenada-referendunGRENADA just held a referendum/vote on the issue of reforming it’s 1974 Constitution, the result of voting spoke of the wishes of the citizenry. Voters also turned down the opportunity to replace the London-based Privy Council with the Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ) as the island’s final court.

THE PEOPLE OF THE NATION MUST DECIDE FIRST as the means for going forward IN ANY MATTER that will affect them. THIS IS GOOD GOVERNANCE, though some tweaking was needed, detailed recommended changes were put forth with insufficient options.

As Antigua and Barbuda is due to hold a referendum next year on the CCJ, …”The people of Antigua and Barbuda will be asked one question in the simplest of ways…”Should we replace the Privy Council with the Caribbean Court of Justice?”

THIS APPROACH WILL CREATE ISSUES as it will not address the key issues involve nor will it allow for a greater understanding of all that it relates, especially the pros and cons. THE GRENADA MODEL OF REFERENDUM VOTING BY CONSTITUENTS is plausible. Constituents must by strong voice show the rejection of representatives acting without the input of those who they represent.

MAY BARBADOS NOW 50 MOVE TOWARDS GOOD GOVERNANCE.

http://www.cbc.bb/index.php/en/news/caribbean-news/item/5412-low-voter-turnout-as-grenadians-snub-changes-to-constitution

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12 Comments on “POLITICS OF INCLUSION, a step in the right direction.”

  1. Well Well & Consequences November 27, 2016 at 9:09 AM #

    Holding the referendum was iconic, the step in the right direction would have been if any of the 25,000 Grenadians had actually researched and understood the 7 changes to their cinstitution that could only have brought positive changes to their lives and that of their children and grandchildren had they chosen the changes.

    As it stands, unless pros are explained to them going forward and another referundum held somewhere along the line, they are right back where they started 50 years ago…. stagnant.

    Like

  2. Hants November 27, 2016 at 9:34 AM #

    mia an david included.

    http://www.barbadosadvocate.com/news/vendors-deserve-better

    Like

  3. Bush Tea November 27, 2016 at 10:04 AM #

    There is a way that seems ‘right’ …but the end thereof is the way of death.
    WW&C is correct, there is no better chance of 200 million brass bowls making the right decision than there is of a single despot doing so in a dictatorial manner.

    Unless those people have the background, the facts and sound information on the consequences, such referenda is like sounding brass….
    Brexit and the Trump fiasco are classic examples of so called educated societies doing shiite in referenda/ elections.

    The fact that we have the idiotic leaders that we do speaks volumes for our collective wisdom.

    There is a MUCH better chance of good governance from a select group of your wisest heads, who are aware of all the facts, the challenges, the consequences and the benefits, and who are able to openly and transparently discuss these issues, and their reasons for making the final decisions. Most importantly, they MUST be held meaningfully responsible for the results and the consequences, and held to the absolutely highest standards of honesty and integrity.

    This business of polling a collection of ignorant brass bowls and taking the net result as ‘gospel’ is plain idiotic. It is how we end up with people like Froon and company …. and Trump.

    Like

  4. de pedantic Dribbler November 27, 2016 at 10:28 AM #

    What exactly is being offered in this another circuitous and aimless debate?

    The author suggests, “…Antigua and Barbuda will be asked one question in the simplest of ways…”Should we replace the Privy Council with the Caribbean Court of Justice?” […] THIS APPROACH WILL CREATE ISSUES as it will not address the key issues involve nor will it allow for a greater understanding of all that it relates, especially the pros and cons. ”

    Ohhh, so what should be done?

    The bloggers suggests, “As it stands, unless pros are explained to them going forward and another referundum held somewhere along the line,…” AND “Unless those people have the background, the facts and sound information on the consequences, such referenda is like sounding brass…”

    REALLY!

    In an island which like Barbados boasts of a literary rate north of 95% and in a technological world where each Grenadian can find out what colour underwear Kim wore today or, more high brow, that the FARC and Colombian government have signed a new peace accord (sans the restrictions of the dismissive plebiscite) we are still offering tired arguments that the population is NOT informed on the options.

    REALLY!

    Like

  5. Well Well & Consequences November 27, 2016 at 10:47 AM #

    Pedant….ya said it yourself, the electorate, voters were programed to be more concerned with the disgusting, slimy lives of the Kardashians et al and what goes on in the bedrooms of their neighbors and friends and any progress their own people attempt to achieve, or what is happening with the rats in buckingham palace, as opposed to what is best for their present and futures generations, it has become cultural so that is the smut they google..

    ……. some on here are also famous for that eg….Alvin, would jump out and make a comment and do not google or research any of it or check the source……and Alvin got a goddamn Ph.D…..

    ……..so just imagine your average joe blow in Grenada who never saw the inside of a university, programmed for the last 50 years to believe that the unimportant is important, making decisions on voting for 7 constitutional changes for actual positive progress in their lives, while their slimy political representative is whispering in their ear that it is not in their best interest to do so, cause said slimy politicians have completely different ulterior motives.

    Knowing the limited knowledge of the population…it was the politicians jobs, because they have such high levels of influence on the uneducated and educated in the Caribbean, who tend to believe all those politicians lies….. to educate those people with indepth and broadbased information on the 7 constitutional changes, using a year’s worth of towhall meetings. …before they voted.

    Like

  6. Kevin November 27, 2016 at 11:37 AM #

    Was a bit disappointed in the low voter turn out but I personally support referendums on these huge sweeping changes.

    Like

  7. nineofnine November 27, 2016 at 2:24 PM #

    You all are saying the same thing…there is a need to FULLY inform, educate and debate any all referendums. The proposal must be transparent.

    Why are they putting Calcium Propionate in bread when this chemical breaks down HUMAN DNA?

    Like

  8. Hal Austin November 27, 2016 at 2:48 PM #

    We are not a Swiss canyon. We are a parliamentary democracy, we elect our members of parliament. Referenda are for politicians who cannot make a decision.
    Every five years political parties come to the people with manifestos and we vote in who we fancy.

    Like

  9. nineofnine November 27, 2016 at 2:54 PM #

    @Hal,
    You mean politicians cannot make a decision without a referenda.

    Like

  10. Well Well & Consequences November 27, 2016 at 3:41 PM #

    http://ow.ly/RZRq306yWYO

    Some people, myself included, don’t eat bread for that very reason.

    Like

  11. VH November 27, 2016 at 4:31 PM #

    For a referendum to truly reflect the will of the people have an eligible voter participation of 75 percent of which at least 50 plus 1 percent support it.

    Like

  12. Gabriel November 27, 2016 at 5:05 PM #

    VH
    You can say the same for the last election result here in 2013 when 69% of the electorate did not vote for this current DLP administration so that Barbados is just lurching from one mistake to another because of an unprepared bunch of ‘wild boys’,so aptly described and named by the last real Prime Minister of Barbados.Since ’08, we have visionless,myopic numbskulls overseeing the affairs of this country.

    Like

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