It is a perennial crop hence it can be harvested as required

Dr.Robert Lucas’ View on Flours

Submitted by Dr. Robert Lucas

 

Composite-FlourDr. Robert D. Lucas

Dun-Low lane

Bridgetown

Barbados, BB11157

robertd.lucas@gmail.com

 

2nd September, 2018

Barbados Underground

Bridgetown, Barbados

West Indies

Dear Sir/Madam,

Recently, there has been a hue and cry in the local media about the use of Cassava flour

In the manufacture of baked goods Barbadians seem to want to re-invent the wheel. The use of composite flours (wheaten flours plus cassava flour for examples) in the manufacture of bread has been practiced as early as the 1950’s and 1960’s (Kim JC and de Ruiter D. “Bread from non-Wheat Flours”. Food Technology. 1968. 22:7: 767-787 and “Bread from Composite Flour”.1969. FAO Technical Bulletin.. Indeed in the last century, there was much talk about import substitution, the saving of foreign currency and the development of indigenous agricultural and food–processing industries in developing countries. As a result in 1977 when I started my PH.D research at St. Augustine Campus, composite flour was the buzz word in Barbados. The late Professor of Food Technology, George M. Sammy asked me what area of research I was interested in. I told him that composite flour seemed to be a good idea, since I had already done quite a bit of research on fruit juices and wanted to change my research interest. Prof. Sammy laughed and told me that composite flour had been beaten to a frazzle.

All of the baking conditions for bread from composite flours have documented by Kim and de Ruiter and the FAO Technical bulletin and other more recent publications. A perusal of the literature teaches one how to overcome problems with the loaf volume and dough strength. The ratio of Cassava flour to wheaten flours is also documented.

There has also been some talk about the Ministry of Agriculture doing research on Cassava varieties. In the late 1970’s and early 1980’s numerous variety of Cassava were imported from South America for the same purpose that is being talked about today. It seems that we are on a merry go round in this island

Sincerely

 

Robert D. Lucas, PH.D., CFS.

Food Biotechnologist.

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69 Comments on “Dr.Robert Lucas’ View on Flours”

  1. David September 2, 2016 at 11:06 PM #

    Thank you for the submissions Dr. Lucas, will update the others within the next 24 hours. Educating those who frequent the social media space is a never ending task.

    Like

  2. Kammie Holder September 2, 2016 at 11:31 PM #

    David you deserve a medal for the content and variety of stories.

    Like

  3. chad99999 September 3, 2016 at 12:59 AM #

    It has been pointed out many times that the Caribbean does not have capable businessmen who can turn relatively new technologies into profitable enterprises. The ingenuity and discipline are not there.
    That is why the government needs to take selected entrepreneurs by the hand and systematically teach them every step of the process of creating and managing new business ventures from scratch.
    Not an easy feat to manage politically. Very hard to pick “winners” anyway.
    Arthur Lewis gave the political class a list of the industries they should be developing. That was 50 years ago. But democracy is a terrible thing. It elevates leaders who are almost always amiable dunces.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. pieceuhderockyeahright September 3, 2016 at 4:02 AM #

    @ Chad 99999

    This is possibly your most profound piece posting here on Barbados Underground ever.

    Eight lines of “encapsulated genius”

    I will create a flier for this.

    Our successive Administrations of alternating cretins comprise aimiable dunces.

    It is to these characters that the serious job of running a government in our one horse economy falls.

    These are they who are tasked, incredibly, with the task of “selectively choosing the million dollar ideas that will drive the economy of the cuntry and consequently this is the substantive and insidious reason that we are doomed to fail.

    The indigenously birthed import substitution idea as touted here by Dr. Lucas, it on its surface seemingly a sound concept that would thrive at the Compete Caribbean Innovation fund of the InterAmerican Development Bank as a pan Caribbean symbiotic project where ultimately the product would be augmented by cassava from othe Caricom Member States.

    Ph.D. In ’77 place Dr Lucas in his 60’s and would suggest that he is part of the Georgie Porgie Afflicted persons cadre or a man despised because he too bright and definitely is brighter than the amiable dunces and their appointed “decides”

    In summary local talent encounters “amiable dunces augmented by a layer of incompetent or grudge full minded or vision less aides, appointed by the same, or previous amiable dunces” which as you know spells repetitive disaster

    Like

  5. Sunshine Sunny Shine September 3, 2016 at 4:14 AM #

    The problem with us, as a people, and a people who wants the world to believe that we understand business is that we do not understand the intricacies of running and maintaining business operations and the capitalising on opportunities when they come a calling. If we understood, I am sure that casava and breadfruit flour would be on supermarket shelves since yesteryear with an already establish export niche due to demands. We are well versed at talking business but not doing the business. Fifty years later, square one still remains square.

    Like

  6. Exclaimer September 3, 2016 at 6:13 AM #

    Marketing Opportunities for cassava based products:An Assessment of the Industrial Potential in Kenya

    Prof. Edward E. KaruriProf Samuel K. MbuguaDr. Joseph KarugiaKelly WandaJohn Jagwe
    February 2001
    University of Nairobi, Department of Food Science Technology and NutritionFoodnet / International Institute of Tropical Agriculture

    http://www.academia.edu/3324126/Marketing_Opportunities_for_cassava_based_products_An_Assessment_of_the_Industrial_Potential_in_Kenya

    Like

  7. David September 3, 2016 at 6:26 AM #

    @chad99999

    Caribbean government you mean? Governments who have repeatedly demonstrated how inefficient and indiscipline they are? How is this possible? How many guarantee funds we have not fully utilized and at the same time SMEs operate seriously compromised read under capitalized? Then we turn to policy. Policy formation is always heavily influenced by networks relationships and all matters not related to the rubric of creating a relevant business climate.

    Like

  8. David September 3, 2016 at 6:34 AM #

    Thanks Kammie, we try with the help of the family.

    Like

  9. Well Well & Consequences September 3, 2016 at 7:13 AM #

    I gitta agree with the Doc…cassava flour is the way to go, gluten free, high in potassium and votamin C…I know I eat it every chance I get….and an exportable commodity, because it grows so well in Barbados, when the crop thieves are not stealing acres of them…shoot those thieves i say.

    This would be a very good export business for the island, lead by the majority, not the greedy, thiefing, jump in front everything…minority business oeople.

    Like

  10. Well Well & Consequences September 3, 2016 at 7:18 AM #

    …”a people who wants the world to believe that we understand business is that we do not understand the intricacies of running and maintaining business operations and the capitalising on opportunities when they come a calling.”

    Particularly the government ministers, they are as dumb as rocks and always need a white or other minority to point out the obvious to them, when the small businessman or woman, roadside vendor etc are better informed about the dynamics needed to start and maintain a business venture, they are never given the opportunity by government deadheads, because they are seen as nobodies.

    Like

  11. Donna September 3, 2016 at 7:28 AM #

    Cassava and breadfruit are actually on the supermarket shelves. The problem for most is the price. But I think they waste more money on nonsense than it would cost them to buy the cassava flour. I am never without my cassava flour.

    Like

  12. Donna September 3, 2016 at 7:29 AM #

    That should be “cassava and breadfruit flour”.

    Like

  13. Gabriel September 3, 2016 at 7:34 AM #

    I thought chad9999 was out of his mind writing about thes governments we have in the Caribbean teaching anybody anything other than how to be corrupt.
    I heard a news story on the BBC yesterday indicating Grenada is making strides in the production of high quality cocoa now fetching US$5000.00 a tonne.Why do we not use our land resource to uplift agriculture to a level which adds to our GNP.

    Like

  14. David September 3, 2016 at 7:41 AM #

    Let us not forget the sweet potato and what is possible with the by-products. To be fair a few of the restaurants have been offering customers the option of ordering sweet potato meals instead of English potatoes. However, we have the problem of praedial larceny. ARMAG the farm leading on sweet potato production has been hard hit.

    Like

  15. Bush Tea September 3, 2016 at 7:50 AM #

    Bob is right – as usual, but Bushie’s simple question is “What stopped him from exploiting this unlimited potential after completing his impressive education four decades ago?”.

    In the Bushman’s humble opinion, there are probably not 10 people in the region more qualified than he, to convert this concept into a major global industry….
    What has Bob been busy doing with his expansive knowledge? …or what has been the barriers?

    It does not take a PhD to work out that we in this region have been talking a roll of shiite on a variety of subjects while doing f***-all….. even AC can see this…

    But what exactly is it that has prevented a clearly brilliant Bajan from actualising such a clear potentiality (..or any of the dozens of other ideas that come so naturally to a great mind)…?

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Exclaimer September 3, 2016 at 7:53 AM #

    I can confirm that Gabriel is correct with reference to the BBC report on the cocoa industry in Grenada. Apparently we in the caribbean produce the highest quality chocolate in the world. Ghana’s cocoa industry has recently become blighted due to a disease/fungus that has caused major destruction to this industry.

    Gabriel, i have been searching for this link by the BBC but i’m unable to locate it. The journalist i believe who reported the above story was a Nick Davis (Jamaican parentage).

    Found it! I tried this morning without success. It must have just gone on.

    https://www.grenadachocolate.com/grenada-chocolate-featured-on-bbc-radio-4-pm-news-programme/

    Like

  17. Exclaimer September 3, 2016 at 7:59 AM #

    It is up to the University of the West Indies to carry out research that will benefit our region. However we all know but that institute is inept and not fit for purpose.

    Like

  18. Well Well & Consequences September 3, 2016 at 8:05 AM #

    Like everything else on the island UWI is too political, just 50 years and the island is saturated with political idiots.

    Another hardy crop that grows very well on the island as well is Kale…..well known for controlling certain NCDs…,, this should also be promoted, extremely high in well needed vitamins and antioxidants.

    Fantastic for export…..if ya had intelligent government ministers and a less self-serving business sector who need to remove their focus from sucking on the taxpayers/local consumers…only.

    Burger King and Chefette will end what remains of good health on the island.

    Like

  19. Bush Tea September 3, 2016 at 8:05 AM #

    @ David
    “….however, we have the problem of praedial larceny.”
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Praedial larceny is not a “problem”. It is a simple fact of life – like vehicle accidents, the flu, slipping on wet surfaces and the occasional accidental fart.

    The ‘PROBLEM’ is the brass bowl JAs who seem incapable of thinking sensibly.

    Don’t we set speed limits, use ABS, enforce traffic rules and insist on good tyres to control traffic accidents?
    Don’t we place signs, and walk carefully – with proper shoes on wet surfaces?

    The difference between humans and brass bowl animals is that we are expected to THINK and RESPOND logically to challenges…. not make lame excuses.

    Listen the the Shiite-hound (formally referred to as a pit-bull) to see what the ‘problem’ is…
    Listen to the various officials from the Ministry of Agriculture to see the ‘problem’..
    Listen to Froon to see the ULTIMATE problem

    …Don’t listen to Adriel the AG though…. he is such a brass bowl female rabbit that you may be tempted to eliminate that particular problem….. JA!!

    Like

  20. Well Well & Consequences September 3, 2016 at 8:09 AM #

    Thanks Donna for reminding me…breadfruit, another solid and very healthy food staple, plant more breadfruit trees, one of my too many sons-in-law from Asia, when he visited was so fascinated with the breadfruit and other local foods which are phenomenal.

    Like

  21. Donna September 3, 2016 at 8:14 AM #

    Sweet potato flour is also on the supermarket shelves.

    Like

  22. Well Well & Consequences September 3, 2016 at 8:15 AM #

    Grenada is said to have the best quality cocoa pods in the world, supplying, exporting the commodity that produces the highest quality chocolates…..

    ….. some dude from the US had revitalized and rebuilt the industry, but he has since died…I hope the government did not let the industry die with him and kept funding the growers…ya can pick a pod from the side of the road…their soil is so good.

    Like

  23. David September 3, 2016 at 8:18 AM #

    @Bush Tea

    We are saying the same thing. A system to register producers, certify sellers etc. While it will not eliminate certainly reduce and help to deter.

    @Exclaimer

    The UWI is not a research university. It calls for funding to do worldclass research. The UWI cannot even pay its teaching staff at the moment.

    Like

  24. Exclaimer September 3, 2016 at 8:22 AM #

    At the rate that we are heading there will be little agricultural land available for us to exploit in food production and all its related activities. But don’t worry we will have houses fit for billionaires complete with swimming pools; and a shoreline decked out with hotels and apartments. That’s the way to go people.

    All it takes is for somebody to implement the research work that has been carried out since time and memorial and then to implement the relevant policies for all. Now how difficult should that be?

    Like

  25. Exclaimer September 3, 2016 at 8:26 AM #

    @ David,

    Then disband it!

    What purpose does it serve if it is not of benefit to the wealth of the country. Develop scholarships whereby the students may study abroad.

    Like

  26. Exclaimer September 3, 2016 at 8:28 AM #

    @ David,

    “World class research” what!

    Like

  27. Exclaimer September 3, 2016 at 8:31 AM #

    @ David

    This posting is a metaphor of why we have failed as a nation:

    We have become a nation of sheep led by donkeys.

    Like

  28. Bush Tea September 3, 2016 at 8:32 AM #

    @ Donna
    You name it …and the flour is available to those who want it.
    That is not the issue.

    The issue is related to the MARKETING and promotion of the asset. The issue is the mindset of Bajan brass bowl leaders who continue to import INFERIOR wheat products while barely tolerating LOCAL, superior, (more suitable for our health) products.

    The authorities do this by penalising farmers, ignoring issues such as praedial larceny, encouraging IMPORTERS and frustrating manufacturers.

    Take a look in your supermarket – EVERY SHIITE contains wheat flour….
    Do you think this is an accident? This is marketing and promotion by OTHERS who don’t give a shiite about our health or wealth…
    Do we grow wheat flour?
    Is celiac disease not a MAJOR issue for many (most) blacks?

    Why is there not a HEALTH levy in Barbados on ALL items containing wheat products to offset the additional pressure placed on the QEH by the promotion of such products?
    Do you think all those fat, arthritic, unhealthy Bajans result from some coincidence…?

    Why is there not a tax refund for items substituting HEALTHY local alternatives like cassava, sweet potato and yams?

    WHY???

    Because brass bowls tend to at best reflect what they see around them..and seem UNABLE to promote their own best interests…

    Liked by 2 people

  29. Bush Tea September 3, 2016 at 8:39 AM #

    @ Exclaimer …re UWI
    Then disband it!
    What purpose does it serve if it is not of benefit to the wealth of the country. Develop scholarships whereby the students may study abroad.
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Yuh think!!!

    Or at the VERY least, RADICALLY restructure it with clear objectives in mind….

    But to continue with the expensive and useless 1960’s model ….
    is the very ultimate is brass bowlery…

    Like

  30. pieceuhderockyeahright September 3, 2016 at 8:43 AM #

    @ Bush Tea

    You asked, and I quote “But what exactly is it that has prevented a clearly brilliant Bajan from actualising such a clear potentiality (..or any of the dozens of other ideas that come so naturally to a great mind)…?”

    I shall be your Huckleberry…

    1.”who de ef is you? Whu is you pedigree? Who you fad dah and mudda scvunt?
    2.”wait…where de ef he get dat idea from?”
    3.”dem doing dat in Amuricans? Whu ef Amuricans ent got dat it cyan wuk!!!”
    4.”where is my cut?”
    5.”can we teif de idea from dat po’ black effers from Marl Hole, Martindales Road?” Can we get he ingrunt scvunt to detail the specifications so I P Harris can copy his document in its entirety and the pn try to teif it or we, the effing board members of this government agency can tek the confidential shyte and replicate it under your nose?
    6.”wait, you mean dat if I give you dis grant dat you gine be a multimillionaire in six months and my black ass gine still be de CEO at EGFL wukking fuh this piece uh chicken salary? Not pun my watch!!!

    And the one which cliches it all

    7.”What de ef you talking bout? Whu I is de minister AND MORE IMPORTANTLY I IS DE DECIDER, and I don’t understand what you talking bout? Whu dis embarrassing me and you embarrassing me, application denied.

    Do you want me to go further?

    Should de ole man detail how, when you overseas how them does try to denigrate you cause you as a black man got more smarts Dan dem but dem gots de money???

    You want me to detail the succinct racism?

    Do you want me to detail the black/black mistrust? The albino centric practices?

    Do you want de ole man to talk bout de problems you accent does cause when you talking to other nationalities?

    Do you want me to go on?

    Do you want me to say that when you move out of the $50k dollar investments to the $5 and $10 million investments that (a) the chicken shit local investors baulk (b) dat dem ent in that category (c) dat is too much money for you?

    Dat you tinking too big!!!

    You really ent serious this morning though but you doing the “advocate” thing to provoke discussion and to increase the number of hits pun de BU website.

    I going and lef dis discussion cause I going cuss and den say too much here and expose who my black ass is a fifth time lololol

    WE ARE NOT READY BUSH TEA, WE ARE THE SCOURGE OF THE WORLD, A NATION, RATHER A 95 percentile, CURSED BY GOD FOR SOMETHING AKIN TO KILLING ABEL OR SOMETHING LIKE SINNING AGAINST THE HOLY GHOST.

    Cum let uh just go and wuk up and have a good time

    Like

  31. de pedantic Dribbler September 3, 2016 at 8:52 AM #

    David, thank you for your 6:26 AM. I paused after reading Chad45’s post on Dr Lucas’ piece. I was then also taken aback by the BU sage @Piece agreeing with Chad’s utterly counter-intuitive remark. I always understood that private enterprise charts the path for the innovative growth and development soaring upward ever and that governments provide the tarmac for those flights. Although the small markets of our island(s) do require some special dispensation by Governments to get things moving there is no credible industry segment which should (or can) be sustained as he has said.

    In his statement, the great minds who have studied law and debating and economics and have never operated even a coconut water stand are charged with the responsibility to “systematically teach them every step of the process of creating and managing new business ventures from scratch.” That is absurd.

    Dr. Lucas has bluntly exposed the issue that plague us too often in our small economies: an ample ability of mental acuity to define and research the problem and then talk it to frigging death.

    Mr. Bush Tea you know full well that the ambitions and personality attributes that make one a PhD graduate are similar but yet fundamentally different to those that get an entrepreneur energized to develop and grow a business.

    The question I would ask coming out of Dr Lucas’ piece is was there no business case for Hill Manufacturing or any other locals to embrace the long ago talk of composite flours and develop the product as a viable ‘cash cow’ as a healthier alternative.

    I hear the critiques above but I am not grasping how the critics are conflating academics with entrepreneurship, coupled with small market economies and too the bureaucratic government officialdom and reaching their conclusions.

    And how long ago did Carmeta Fraser pass away!!! I recall her advancing sweet potato fries (or chips if you are UK based). Some years back I was most impressed when I was able to get that exact threat at a Burger King (or maybe it was a Wendy’s). Carmeta would be pleased, surely. Took forever to go main stream, but heh as they sorta say: all good things….are on a merry go round in this island.

    Like

  32. Well Well & Consequences September 3, 2016 at 9:00 AM #

    Piece….it’s a curse of their own making on themselves, it’s called a nasty, stinking, petty, bad mind.

    I have to keep talking about this parent who called Ronald Jones regarding a scholar who was studying a certain advanced,, relatively new.., at that time…. and fail proof discipline at a top university.

    Jones response was one for the ages, when told the name of the discipline. …”wuh is that” Jones declares…, and that is from the Minister of Education.

    Barbados’ loss….North America’s gain….because of the petty minded idiots ya have for government ministers…, and those posing as professionals in those pits of vipers and crabs for statutory boards, lending agencies.

    I would bet my last dollar Jones still does not know the extent of what that student studied, accomplished or the continuing success.

    Just dont carry ya business plan to any of them, try finding an outside source of funding, even if ya have to partner with someone outside the island….stay away from those thieves and dream killers.

    Like

  33. Donna September 3, 2016 at 9:02 AM #

    David,

    The system was been devised at least ten years ago. No

    Like

  34. Donna September 3, 2016 at 9:03 AM #

    was devised

    Like

  35. Donna September 3, 2016 at 9:04 AM #

    No follow up.

    Sorry. Lack of sleep.

    Like

  36. David September 3, 2016 at 9:07 AM #

    With Haynesley Benn, James Paul et al in the DLP one would have thought this government would have been able to come up with a coherent policy in the last 8 years. Same old.

    Like

  37. Donna September 3, 2016 at 9:09 AM #

    I know. The average idiot waits for somebody to tell them what’s good for them. And to kick them in the backside to get them to start doing it.

    Like

  38. Well Well & Consequences September 3, 2016 at 9:20 AM #

    Lol…they are lazy and useless, a white Canadian is finally down there to sell them the use of the sun……but the sun is free….lol

    Like

  39. Gabriel September 3, 2016 at 9:46 AM #

    We can compare with what obtained in the former Barbados we knew before the ultimate azoles like fumble was chosen by the poor rakey party to be primatus supremus.Think like Wynter Crawford.

    Like

  40. Sunshine Sunny Shine September 3, 2016 at 10:05 AM #

    Donna

    Is this flour really on Barbadians retail shelves? I asked my peeps and they say they did not see it in Supercentre Massi, Pricemart, Shopsmart, Carlton and A1 etc. However, they told me that it can be found in BMC shop on Princess Alice Highway.

    Like

  41. Sargeant September 3, 2016 at 10:10 AM #

    @Bush Tea
    Why is there not a HEALTH levy in Barbados on ALL items containing wheat products to offset the additional pressure placed on the QEH by the promotion of such products?
    ++++++++++
    Why is there not a shite talk tax in Barbados so that you Croesus can go broke? Doesn’t every item in the supermarket contain sodium or sugar which are more detrimental to Bajans? Why not a health levy on those items? Show me the statistics that show that most blacks are affected with celiac disease? Aren’t many blacks affected by lactose in milk? Let’s ban cows.

    For a self-promoting Biblical scholar you should be familiar with Ecclesiastes which has a verse containing the words about “nothing new under the sun” and people have been using some version of cassava flour for millennia the difference here is that Dr. Lucas wrote about the subject and people here want the Gov’t to set up Cassava plantations.

    The knee jerk response to articles is overwhelming.

    Like

  42. Donna September 3, 2016 at 10:21 AM #

    Carlton and A one should have it. Emerald City does for sure. They are all side by side on the shelf.

    Like

  43. Bush Tea September 3, 2016 at 11:08 AM #

    @ Sargeant
    Truly…This morning, Bushie just don’t feel like engaging a small-minded NCO who routinely drinks Canadian recycled piss for water….. so get thee behind Bushie’s donkey…

    @ Piece
    EXACTLY right in your summary of why our talented people like Lucas are UNDER-UTILISED.
    In REAL countries, people like him are practically CONSCRIPTED and FACILITATED to success that benefits himself…and the whole country.

    What is really amazing is that Wynter Crawford, (Bushie’s PERSONAL HERO), an ordinary born and bred Bajan of Cawmere extraction, was able to operate at such a HIGH level at the beginning of our national journey, while here we are, 50 years on …with a pack of monkeys doing shiite – aided and abetted by some overseas lackies who moved to albino-land to lap up their left-overs and imbibe their recycled piss….

    However we look at the matter, it HAS to be the collective fault of ordinary Bajans who have allowed ourselves to so obviously REGRESS developmentally …that we are now in imminent danger of being exactly back where we were in the old plantation days….

    When we can have persons like Kammie seeing the ‘value’ of encouraging the absentee owners of Hyatt to come and establish their 21st century plantation so that a few hundred room-cleaners, waiters and yard boys can be established on the plantation…. just like back in the days of olde…

    Crawford must be pissing himself with rage….
    especially at Kammie (no one expects anything more from the NCO….)

    Like

  44. de pedantic Dribbler September 3, 2016 at 11:16 AM #

    Mr. Bush Tea you know full well that the ambitions and personality attributes that make one a PhD graduate are similar but yet fundamentally different to those that energize an entrepreneur to develop and grow a business.

    The question I would ask coming out of Dr Lucas’ piece is was there no business case for Hill Manufacturing or any other locals to embrace the long ago talk of composite flours and develop the product (with his expert guidance) as a viable ‘cash cow’ as a healthier alternative.

    I hear the critiques above but I am not grasping how the critics are conflating academics with entrepreneurship, coupled with small market economies and too the bureaucratic government officialdom to reach their conclusions.

    BTW, you too love to attack when you ‘lost for words’.

    Like

  45. de pedantic Dribbler September 3, 2016 at 11:20 AM #

    Dr. Lucas has bluntly exposed the issues that plague us too often in our small economies: an ample ability of mental acuity to define and research the problem and then talk it to frigging death.

    I paused after reading Chad45. I was then also taken aback by the BU sage @Piece agreeing with Chad’s utterly counter-intuitive remark. It has long been held that private enterprise charts the path for the innovative growth and development of soaring upward ever and that governments provide the tarmac and process for those flights.

    Although the small markets of our island(s) do require some special dispensations by Governments to get things moving in some industries there is no credible industry segment which should (or can) be sustained as he has said.

    According to the blogger, the ‘great minds’ who have studied law and debating and economics and often have never operated even a coconut-water stand are charged with the responsibility to “systematically teach them every step of the process of creating and managing new business ventures from scratch.”

    That befuddles commonsense.

    Like

  46. Sargeant September 3, 2016 at 11:21 AM #

    @Bush Tea
    That’s the best you can do? Yuh powder wet

    How about a health levy on demon rum, think of all the misery it has produced over the years, brek up relationships, abused women and children, absenteeism, loss of production, cirrhosis of the liver and other medical maladies and de list goes on, yuh keep blaming “Brass bowls” yuh certain de culprit ain’t rum?

    Like

  47. de pedantic Dribbler September 3, 2016 at 11:25 AM #

    And finally, let’s recall the voice of Ms Fraser! I recall her advancing sweet potato fries (or chips if you are UK based).

    Some years back I was most impressed when I was able to get that exact threat at a Burger King no less (or maybe it was a Wendy’s). And of course there are also in the chilled section of the grocery story.

    Took forever to go fully main stream, but heh as they sorta say: all good things….are on a merry go round in this island.

    Carmeta would still be pleased, surely.

    Like

  48. Donna September 3, 2016 at 11:31 AM #

    Hill Milling was approached years ago by the BADMC. Don’t know what happened to that.

    Like

  49. Georgie Porgie September 3, 2016 at 11:36 AM #

    Sargeant September 3, 2016 at 10:10 AM #

    Yours is an excelent post

    1 Why is there not a shite talk tax in Barbados so that you Croesus can go broke?

    2 Show me the statistics that show that most blacks are affected with celiac disease? Aren’t many blacks affected by lactose in milk? Let’s ban cows. so we can get lots

    3 For a self-promoting Biblical scholar—–well described

    4 clesiastes which has a verse containing the words about “nothing new under the sun” and people have been using some version of cassava flour for millennia the difference here is that Dr. Lucas wrote about the subject and people here want the Gov’t to set up Cassava plantations.

    5 The knee jerk response to articles is overwhelming.

    6 Doesn’t every item in the supermarket contain sodium or sugar which are more detrimental to Bajans? Why not a health levy on those items?

    7 Sargeant September 3, 2016 at 11:21 AM #

    How about a health levy on demon rum, think of all the misery it has produced over the years, brek up relationships, abused women and children, absenteeism, loss of production, cirrhosis of the liver and other medical maladies and de list goes on

    Like

  50. de pedantic Dribbler September 3, 2016 at 11:43 AM #

    @Bushie, why so damned negative with the remark: “When we can have persons like Kammie seeing the ‘value’ of encouraging the absentee owners of Hyatt to come and establish their 21st century plantation so that a few hundred room-cleaners, waiters and yard boys can be established on the plantation…. just like back in the days of olde…”

    Is the anger to Hyatt based on your “Hyatt to come and establish their 21st century plantation” or is it based on the corrupt process which was allegedly employed to bring the project to its proposed start date and also the suggested incongruity of that plant in a designated heritage area?

    Can Barbados develop a viable hotel plant without partnership with the established brands. And why can’t those partnership be on equal footing. Wouldn’t Mr Crawford also forge meaningful -equal – relationship with outsiders???

    It is positive and correct to demand that Barbados get some management trainee spots with this Hyatt management contract and other concessions that are certainly within the scope of the negotiators. But to harp on this plantation shtick when there are no monied local investors throwing that sort of money around is rather petty frankly.

    Like

  51. Piece Uh De Rock Yeah Right - INRI September 3, 2016 at 11:44 AM #

    @ Sargeant

    You post at 10.10 a.m. specifically the “knee jerk” aspect of your posit is disingenuous at best and idiotic at worst.

    Finite embodied existence of which class of being you number, MUST INHABIT PROXIMATE SPACE, BEFORE IT ATTAINS ITS ULTIMATE DESTINATION.

    In simple terms, you and me, as humans, SANS TELEPATHY OR TELEPORTATION, can only engage base of the iterative basis of acquisition of solid, liquid or gas, through sensory organs or via shared communications.

    Speech is “acquired” through your synthesis of contiguous sounds composed of vowels and consonants and the same holds for reading where a sequence of letters, in a specific language, conveys a particular concept. Video combines a graphic and sounds to create a similar outcome.

    To use that term knee jerk is a simplistic pronouncement akin to a man reading the first line of a tale of two cities and stating emphatically that the book is going to be a boring book because you assume some deity of sentience we other mortals do not have for unlike us, you do not have “begin points” you do not take 1,000 steps to reach your destination of one mile, you just turn and you are there, transported by higher sentience.

    The author suggests cassava as a viable supplement/additive/alternative to GMO materials and the idea of indigenous supply is an extrapolation from that “begin point” cause my man, I ent know wu planet you living pun but, this system dat we employing in Barbados jest ent wukking.

    BU is a humanoid mechanism through which we simple sentient beings suggest these “begin points” notwithstanding I am sure that others here would benefit greatly from your advanced telepathy and transmutation techniques that subsume “knee jerks”

    Like

  52. Georgie Porgie September 3, 2016 at 11:47 AM #

    mrs fraser unfortunately
    1 died too young
    2 was black and maybe too poor to be influential

    however, it can not be denied that she had very useful ideas

    there is a lot of talk about sugar and salt BUT NONE ABOUT HORMONES- WHICH IS APPARENTLY THE REAL CAUSATIVE AGENT IN DISEASE

    IF SUGAR WAS THE MAIN CULPRIT IN DIABETES FOR INSTANCE THEN SHOULD NOT DIABETICS JUST EAT LHTS OF PROTEIN AND FAT—- AFTER ALL YOU CANT TURN FAT INTO SUGAR (ALTHOUGH GLYCEROL CAN BE CONVERTED INTO A LITTLE BIT OF SUGAR BY GLUCONEOGENESIS)

    Like

  53. Well Well & Consequences September 3, 2016 at 11:48 AM #

    GP…people been talking about casava as a anothrr staple as well as an export product for many yesrs, no one listens, they prefer depend on tourists….ONLY. buena suerte.

    Like

  54. Kammie Holder September 3, 2016 at 12:03 PM #

    Oh by the way, Cassava leaves and Sweet Potato leaves are eaten all over Africa and some parts of Asia. Can we not export these leaves?

    I forget we are still dumb enough as a black diaspora to be waiting for a neocolonist to start a direct shipping and airline route from the Caribbean. #CaricomInept #VisionlessCaricomLeaders #ANewWay

    Like

  55. Georgie Porgie September 3, 2016 at 12:09 PM #

    sOME INFO ON GENETIC ENGINEERING

    • Today, over 18 million people in the United States have diabetes, a group of diseases resulting from abnormally high blood glucose levels. One cause is from the inability of the body to produce sufficient levels of insulin (referred to as juvenile or insulin-dependent diabetes or type I diabetes) to control the blood glucose level.
    • This means that diabetics must receive daily injections of the protein to survive.
    • Before 1982, diabetics received purified insulin extracted and purified from the pancreas of cattle and pig cadavers. This can pose a problem because animal insulin could trigger allergenic reactions and possibly contain unknown viruses that had infected the animal.
    • The solution was to produce insulin using genetic engineering techniques. Eli Lilly marketed the first such synthetic insulin, called Humulin, in 1982.
    • Since then, other genetically-engineered insulin products have been developed. Such commercial successes of biotech¬nology were a sign of things to come.
    • The best way to understand how genetic engineering operates is to follow an actual procedure for the production of insulin. •
    • Microlnquiry 8 describes one of the early methods—by cloning the human gene for insulin into bacterial cells.
    • This involves isolating the piece of DNA containing the human insulin gene, precisely cutting the gene out, and splicing the insulin gene into a bacterial plasmid.
    • The recombinant DNA then is placed in bacterial cells like E. coli, forming clones. The cells transcribe the mRNA, translate it into the protein, and then secrete the human insulin.
    • Besides insulin, a number of other proteins of important pharmaceutical value to humans have been produced by genetically-engineered microorganisms.
    • Many of these proteins, such as the interferons, are produced in relatively low amounts in the body, making purification extremely costly. Therefore, the only economical solution to obtain significant amounts of the product is through genetic engineering.
    • In 2005, thousands of biotechnology companies worldwide were working on the commercial and practical applications of genetic engineering.
    • Some are research companies with special units for these studies, while others were established solely to pursue and develop new products by gene engineering techniques. Let’s look at a few examples.
    • Environmental biology.
    • We already know the usefulness of prokaryotes as a source of genes.
    • Prokaryotes represent a huge, mostly untapped gene pool representing metabolically diverse processes. Examples such as bioremediation have been discussed where genetically engineered or genetically recombined prokaryotic cells are provided with specific genes whose products will break down pollutants, clean up waste materials, or degrade oil spills.
    • We have barely scratched the surface to take advantage of the metabolic diversity present in prokaryotes.
    • Antibiotic production.
    • The presence or threat of infectious disease represents a high demand for antibiotics.
    • Therefore, many antibiotics today are produced commercially using microorganisms. Although antibiotics are produced in nature, the bacterial or fungal cell often does not produce these compounds in high yield.
    • Furthermore, as no new class of antibiotics has been identified since the early 1990’s, existing compounds need to be redesigned to reach their targets more efficiently.
    • This means the microbes must be genetically engineered to produce larger quantities of antibiotics and/or to produce modified antibiotics to which infectious microbes have yet to show resistance.
    • Pharmaceutical applications.
    • The pharmaceutical products of DNA are numerous and diverse
    • Many of the genetically engineered products are either the organism itself or proteins expressed by recombinant DNA in clones
    • Agricultural applications. Genetic engineering has extended into many realms of science.
    • In agriculture, for example, genes for herbicide resistance have been transplanted from bacterial cells into tobacco plants, demonstrating that these transgenic plants better tolerate the herbicides used for weed control.
    • For tomato growers, a notable advance was made when researchers at Washington University spliced genes from a pathogenic virus into tomato plant cells and demonstrated the cells would produce viral proteins at their surface.
    • The viral proteins blocked viral infection, providing resistance to the transgenic tomato plants.

    • For gene transfer experiments in plants, the vector DNA often used for transfer is a plasmid from the bacterium Agrobacterium tumefaciens.
    • This organism causes a plant tumor called crown gall, which develops when DNA from the bacterial cells inserts itself into the plant cell’s chromosomes. Researchers remove the tumor-inducing gene from the plasmid and then splice the desired gene into the plasmid and allow the bacterial cells to infect the plant.
    • The dairy industry was the first to feel the dramatic effect of the new DNA technology. In the 1980s, researchers at Cornell University injected dairy cows with bovine growth hormone (BGH) produced from bacterial cells engineered with the BGH gene. They reported a 41 percent increase in milk from the experimental cows.
    • Also being developed is a pig with more meat and less fat, a product of genetically engineered porcine growth hormone.
    • Scientists at Auburn University have endowed young carp with extra copies of activated growth hormone genes, hoping to enable the fish to grow more efficiently in aquacultural surroundings.

    • Detection and diagnosis. The genes of an organism contain the essential information responsible for its behavior and characteristics.
    • Bacterial pathogens, for example, contain specific sequences of nucleotides that can confer on the pathogen the ability to infect and cause disease in the host.
    • Because these nucleotide sequences are distinctive and often unique, if detectable, they can be used as a definitive diagnostic determinant.

    • In the medical laboratory, diagnosticians are optimistic about the use of DNA probes, single-stranded DNA molecules that recognize and bind to a distinctive and unique nucleotide sequence of a pathogen.
    • The DNA probe binds (hybridizes) to its complementary nucleotide sequence from the pathogen, much like strips of Velcro stick together.
    • To make a probe, scientists first identify the DNA segment (or gene) in the pathogen that will be the target of a probe. Using this segment, they construct the single-stranded DNA probe.
    • More than 100 DN probes have been developed for the detection of pathogenic viruses and microbes.


    • As an example, a DNA probe exists for the early detection of malarial infections caused by the protozoan Plasmodium falciparum. DNA isolated from the tissues of the suspect patient and fragmented into single-stranded DNA segments. These segments are attached to a solid support.
    • The labeled DNA probe is added. If the DNA sample from the patient contains the target P. falciparum DNA segment, the probe binds to the complementary nucleotide sequence.
    • In doing so, it concentrates the label (radioactivity,fluorescence, or a colored chemical) at that site and indicates a match has been made.
    • Clearly, the use of DNA probes represents a reliable and rapid method for detecting and diagnosing many human infectious diseases.

    • Vaccine production. Microbial vaccines traditionally have been either killed or attenuated (inactivated) preparations. Sometimes attenuated microbial preparations are not completely inactivated and a slight chance exists that the patient could develop the disease for which they have been vaccinated.
    • Today, genetic engineering has developed subunit vaccines, which are risk free for people being vaccinated The hepatitis B vaccine, for example, is perfectly safe because the vaccine is made from only the protein coat subunits of the virus.
    • The viral genes for the coat are cloned in yeast cells, and the viral protein harvested as the vaccine. Active hepatitis B viruses cannot arise from such vaccine material.


    • Recombinant vaccines also are attractive because the precise genetic makeup of the vaccine is known, often making the administration of higher doses possible without the development of serious side effects.
    • Such vaccines can be produced faster than traditional vaccines, although they are not always cheaper.
    • Also being developed are DNA vaccines where the genetic material (a gene) is the vaccine.
    • Such gene vaccines often produce immunity in the individual in which the gene has been taken up. Again, they should be safe and cheaper to produce.

    • Lastly it should be mentioned that genetically engineered products are not always a “no brainer” in terms of their development. This is no clearer than in the attempts to develop a vaccine for AIDS.
    • Since 1987, scientists and genetic engineers have tried to identify viral subunits that can be used to develop an AIDS vaccine
    • However, it is not so much that genetic engineering can’t be done as it is the virus just seems to find ways to circumvent a vaccine and the immunity developing in the patient.
    • Still, scientists hope a safe and effective genetically-engineered vaccine can be developed.

    Like

  56. Sargeant September 3, 2016 at 12:09 PM #

    @PUDRYR
    I believe that you have something so say but you should recalibrate your weapon because your aim is askew, hope they accept you back in sharp shooting school.

    I gather from the author’s piece that there is some disquiet about the composition of flours in Barbados and he was simply iterating that flour has had other components for a considerable time and he was also commenting on the availability of cassava flour. Now up rides Bush Tea on his trusty steed to write that Gov’t should impose a “health levy on flour” and about many black people have celiac disease. That response in my opinion counts as “knee jerk” and I have no apologies to make for that statement.

    BTW that prose you proffered bordered on PHD material and yuh had this lesser mortal scrambling for his Thesaurus.

    Like

  57. Piece Uh De Rock Yeah Right - INRI September 3, 2016 at 12:17 PM #

    @ De Word aka DPD

    I should have made some disclaimers when I concurred wit Chad 99999 on “amiable dunces”

    Normal Governments elsewhere are facilitators our successive governments are competitors.

    Normal governments have enabling mechanisms and Human Resources that are capable of providing that support that entrepreneurs need, our mock stick government does not. In fact the agencies so mandates are, in their majority filled with public service minded staff AND NOT ENTREPRENEUR SUPPORT HR!!!

    Normal governments have micro enterprise development agencies which coexist with and ably assist SMEs. We in Barbados have pretend Bank Managers masquerading as MEDIs and pretenders wanting to get their money on SME funding

    Look in the paper today and you will the embodiment of what I am speaking about.

    SBA CEO Lynette Holder, a member of the Bridgetown Credit Union is consorting with its CEO Steve Belle to force the Minister of Finance Sinckler to instruct the Barbados central Bank to permit her credit union to access the central bank guarantee so that he and she can divvy up the money among the SBA members that suck her and Mugabe’s pooch!!!

    Gentlemen leh we get serious here!!! We need to call this shyte what it is.

    And De Word you dun know that we do not have a private sector with a mindset to support new technologies like first world countries, what we have are a band of leeches that trade in imported produce!!!

    What a man like Dr Lucas or Dr GP or any son or daughter of the soil encounters is not camaraderie it is sanctioned extermination at the hands of our own citizens

    I see that another black man in America had adopted my ting about not standing ever again to the Bajan National anthem because it ent bout me or you my brother it is about form without substance.

    I therefore categorically re-state my agreement with part of Chad s posit i.e. that we have amiable dunces and I further re-state what I said before and append that “the normal dynamic of a country committed to development through positive actions of private and public sector actors, DOES NOT EXIST”

    Like

  58. Bernard Codrington. September 3, 2016 at 12:18 PM #

    GOB is not responsible for taking innovative ideas to market. But for the past 40years it has been doing so from BADMC. The causes of NCDS are now more clearly identified. This should provide a market and a reasonable chance of making these local products profitable. Congratulations Robert Lucas for your inforamatve article and your attempts to educate Barbadians over your whole career.

    Like

  59. Piece Uh De Rock Yeah Right - INRI September 3, 2016 at 12:37 PM #

    @ Sargeant

    Forgive the theosophical discourse.

    This is what I read “… “nothing new under the sun” and people have been using some version of cassava flour for millennia the difference here is that Dr. Lucas wrote about the subject and people here want the Gov’t to set up Cassava plantations.

    The knee jerk response to articles is overwhelming.”

    I interpreted that you had said “what he, Dr Lucas spoke or regarding what his thesis was based on, was not new” and that ensuing suggestions or what I called “begin points” for indigenous alternatives were “knee jerk reactions”

    I was only saying circuitously that the gateway that BU provided should be a “begin point” facilitator but I see that your focus was on another aspect of that former post

    My bad.

    I blame my dimness on the fact that I recently was conversing with a certain body here and something may have rubbed off, lolol

    Like

  60. Sunshine Sunny Shine September 3, 2016 at 12:56 PM #

    Dr Lucas is a brilliant scientist, but with his brilliance, he allowed arrogance, egotistic behaviour, self-centredness, haughtiness, high-mindedness and lack of wisdom in certain situations to take centre stage. He has not gotten his rightful dues because of the latter behaviour. Other than that, this man should have been picked up like a rear commodity and utilised to his full potential.

    Like

  61. Donna September 3, 2016 at 1:00 PM #

    Still here using Carmeta’s cookbook. Marion Harte took over from Carmeta and did as good a job as could be expected under the circumstances.

    Like

  62. Exclaimer September 3, 2016 at 1:14 PM #

    @ Donna,

    I know that you like playing the role of the housewife (smile – remember?).

    The link that i sent earlier includes the recipe below. It sounds like a pone or a stew dumpling mix.

    Cassava pudding:

    Grated cassava roots are mixed with grated coconut and sugar. A banana leaf is cut in to two big pieces and softened over fire. Half of the cassava mixture is put on one piece of the bananaleaf, folded and tied. The other package is prepared in a similar manner. Both packages are putin a greased tin or a small pan and baked in a moderately hot oven until brown. The cassava pudding could either be served hot or cold. A variation in a similar dish involves steaming the pudding instead of baking and groundnut flour could replace the coconut cream

    Like

  63. Donna September 3, 2016 at 1:20 PM #

    Exclaimer,

    I am like GP. I have a memory like an elephant.

    Thanks for the recipe!

    Like

  64. Anonymice - The Gazer September 3, 2016 at 1:27 PM #

    Pudding or pone.
    I know pone but never used banana leaves in the preparation.
    Wondering if exclaimer getting his recipes mixed up —- conkies 🙂
    (last line was said in jest)

    Like

  65. Gabriel September 3, 2016 at 3:12 PM #

    The Bdos national anthem is indicative of becoming a member of the DLP.Never me and that unholy alliance. Just take a drive along the Westbury Road section of the cemetery wall and it’s enough to make one wonder what these ahzouls will think of next.effing clungs.

    Like

  66. chad99999 September 3, 2016 at 4:22 PM #

    de Dribbler has launched another unprovoked attack on my comment about the need for governments to systematically teach selected local businessmen how to launch and manage business ventures that exploit new technologies.
    So let me point out that governments have or can acquire the connections and capability to do many things. They can hire the best expert consultants available — from the region and around the world — to tutor entrepreneurs in the practical details of financing, producing, and marketing the products generated by a specific new technology. They can create or broker partnerships between foreigners and local businessmen to demonstrate the new technology in local pilot projects — pioneering farms and factories that help tackle the practical obstacles that must be overcome before the profitability of a new technology can be assured. They can even provide loan guarantees for individual ventures.
    I don’t expect politicians or their officials to have practical expertise in agricultural or manufacturing enterprise. I do expect them to hire experts and finance demonstration projects.

    Like

  67. de pedantic Dribbler September 3, 2016 at 6:50 PM #

    No Chad45, there can be so real semblance of an ‘unprovoked attack’ in blogging. As soon as we opine others are free to agree or disagree…there is no attack unless you are thin-skinned and cannot debate your own opinions.

    Your remarks at 4:22 PM speak eloquently to a government’s involvement. What I described as the tarmac from which private enterprise flies or what Codrington described as “GOB is not responsible for taking innovative ideas to market.” Your earlier remarks were a mishmash that befuddled commonsense. You clarified that.

    You obviously enjoy provocative posting to prod others…and I do take your bait So don’t try to disown your model this late in the game. You are also obviously a quite intelligent fellow despite any of the personality flaws about which I have accused you previously. So let’s not add wimping-from-debate to those. LOLL.

    Like

  68. Simple Simon September 10, 2016 at 12:13 AM #

    I didn’t know that people had stopped growing cassava and stopped producing cassava flour. In my family we never stopped. Right now my cassava planted at the beginning of the rainy season is tall enough and green enough that yo.u could hide a whole army in the field. At the beginning of the dry season I’ll make enough cassava flour to tide me through to the beginning of the next rainy season. And so it has always gone.

    Pone, cassava bakes, come November and the pumpkins are ripe blackeyed pea soup with cassava dumplings.

    If you have access to any land at all, why would you eat any differently?

    Like

  69. balance September 10, 2016 at 4:48 AM #

    “Exclaimer September 3, 2016 at 7:59 AM #

    It is up to the University of the West Indies to carry out research that will benefit our region. However we all know but that institute is inept and not fit for purpose.”

    No Sir- the problem is insularity. No progress will be made satisfactorily at any level or any respect garnered internationally unless we are able to disabuse ourselves of the fantasy that our two by three nations can stand alone. United we stand -divided we fall.

    Like

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