AUB

American University of Barbados Offers FREE Medical Attention

Submitted by Dr.Georgie Porgie
 John Boyce, Minister of Health

John Boyce, Minister of Health

I woke up this morning to read this rubbish in the SUNDAY NATION NEWSPAPER of Barbados.

BARBADIANS SHOULD SOON have access to totally free medical attention. The lone offshore medical school operating here, the American University of Barbados (AUB), is only awaiting word from Government to start such clinics. AUB president Meesam Ali Khan said the clinics were delayed because of certain permissions needed from Government, for which the process was ongoing.

AUB is also in talks with the Government for placing super-specialty doctors in their polyclinics for specialised medical care in the field of medicine, pediatrics, orthopedics, surgery, and so on. “The benefit of this will be that the Government polyclinics will have super-specialty doctors without the Government having to pay for it. “It will also benefit the patients because they won’t need to wait for an appointment at the [Queen Elizabeth Hospital], which is already overworked,” said Khan. (SP)

What rubbish? Since September 1985, long before the American University of Barbados (AUB), was conceived, access to totally free medical attention was the norm in Barbados has been the norm. The American University of Barbados (AUB), needs to explain to the people of Barbados where and when and how these clinics will be staffed and where they will be set up.

The Government of Barbados needs to explain to the medical fraternity in Barbados what it is going to spring on the people of Barbados in association with the American University of Barbados (AUB). Is AUB implying that they are no specialists in Barbados in the field of medicine, paediatrics, orthopaedics, surgery, and so on?  Are they going to hire UWI trained doctors and specialists? Where will they bring these super-specialty doctors from? India? Mars?

When I read about “The benefit of this will be that the Government polyclinics will have super-specialty doctors without the Government having to pay for it, I think BEWARE OF THE GREEKS BEARING GIFTS. Since 1978 there have been and increasing number of Offshore Medical schools in the Caribbean. Never before has such an offer been made. Why was not such an arrangement not been made before? Why did not our fumbling Government negotiate such in the terms of they being here in the first place.

How many Bajan doctors are teaching at AUB now?

THIS IS OBVIOUSLY A PLOY BY THIS SCHOOL WHICH IS HAVING DIFFICULTY IN FINDING SITES FOR CLINICAL ROTATIONS OVERSEAS. This is a ploy to fool the students of the school that working or following doctors in these clinics that this is the same as their clinical training. EVERYONE KNOWS THAT THE OFFSHORE MEDICAL SCHOOLS ARE FINDING IT INCREASINGLY DIFFICULT TO GET CLINICAL ROTATIONS IN THE STATES AND ELSEWHERE.

WHO WILL SUPERVISE THESE CLINICS?

ARE OUR PEOPLE TO BE USED AS GUINEA PIGS?

WHAT RULE WILL BAMP AND THE BARBADOS MEDICAL COUNCIL HAVE IN THE SUPERVISION OF THESE CLINICS?

CAN A BUNCH OF INDIANS RUNNING A MEDICAL SCHOOL JUST WALK INTO BARBADOS AND FOOL THE BARBADOS GOVERNMENT JUST SO?

WHAT IS GOING ON?

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126 Comments on “American University of Barbados Offers FREE Medical Attention”

  1. Georgie Porgie May 23, 2016 at 1:36 PM #

    RE Oversight of offshore schools by U.S. regulators is minimal to nonexistent.

    ALL THEY CARE ABOUT IS WHETHER YOU CAN PASS THE STEP EXAMS

    They dont ask if you related to AC or DOMPEY etc or nuttin so

    Like

  2. Simple Simon May 23, 2016 at 2:31 PM #

    @Well Well & Consequences May 23, 2016 at 5:55 AM “they should not be advertising as an American school if their principle owners are all Indian, from India, unless they are also registered in the US…that’s false advertising and needs to be brought to the attention of the US Embassy.

    The school which was or is at Wildey is located one bus-stop away from the U.S. Embassy. The Embassy MUST therefore know that the school is there.

    However unlike France which holds a copyright on the word “Champagne” and nobody else can call their white sparkling wine “Champagne” even if it is an excellent sparkling white wine, the U.S. does not hold copyright on the words “America” or “U.S.” or “United States” etc. so therefore anybody can call their thing “American” and the real, real Americans can’t do a thing about it.

    The American University in Barbados is a school located in Barbados run by Indians. The Americans have NOTHING to do with it.

    Anybody can therefore traffic on the good name of the Americans.

    I think that the use of the term “American” for something which is not American is deceptive, but hey I am only a

    Simple Simon

    Like

  3. Well Well & Consequences May 23, 2016 at 2:52 PM #

    Lol…Simple as I said, if it’s not registered as an American entity in America and is actually an Indian med school owned by Indian nationals from India, it’s false advertising…regarding the US having a patent for the use of the name America is a separate issue, which I know nothing about, would have to check the Library of Congress, they deal with US patents.

    Ya see, the problem with false advertising, potential medical students from India will actually believe they have a shot of getting a slot at residency in a US hospital…according to GP, they now have a snowballs chance in hell..so it could never be an American med school.

    You really believe that embassy staff look around when they go to and leave work, they might have seen the school, but even if it registered, they too probably believe it’s an American school, until someone brings it to their attention and/or they find out otherwise…or the school might actually be also registered in the US…who knows unless they check…that is what background checks or for…tell ya politicians.

    Like

  4. Well Well & Consequences May 23, 2016 at 3:10 PM #

    GP…those indian dudes are ruthless and reckless, all that scheming, he drops dead and they still continue the scam school, but the St. Kitts authorities are obviously allowing it, Barbados is doing the same thing…good luck to them I say.

    “July 3rd, 2014 — The Board of Directors of Windsor University School of Medicine sadly announces the passing away of its founder: Doctor Srinivas Gaddam (1962-2014). President Gaddam is survived by his mother, his wife, and his two children.

    Doctor Gaddam went to medical school in India; he did his Family Practice residency training in Washington DC. After a brief stint of practice in Virginia Beach, Virginia, Doctor Gaddam established Windsor University School of Medicine in 1998 in Turks and Caicos and moved it to the island of St. Kitts in 2000.

    He had a passion for Medical Education – He wanted to help students who aspired to become physicians and could not get through the traditional medical school realize their dream at Windsor University School of Medicine.

    He brought together an excellent faculty, created the infrastructure and the curriculum to make Windsor University School of Medicine a highly successful medical school in Caribbean where students come from all parts of the world for their medical education.

    On Thursday, July 3, 2014 a brief gathering was held on Windsor Campus in Doctor Gaddam’s honor and was attended by Faculty, Staff and Students.

    Doctor Gaddam’s Thanksgiving Service will be held at Heartland Memorial Center (1-708- 444-2266), 7151 183rd St, Tinley Park, IL 60477, Chicago on July 5th, 2014. He will be cremated as per the Hindu Tradition.

    His Love for the island of St. Kitts and its people was deep and enduring.

    His Family and Board of directors of Windsor University School of Medicine intend to continue and build on his legacy by making Windsor University School of Medicine stronger and better to serve the future generations of medical students.”

    Like

  5. Piece uh de Rock Yeah Right May 23, 2016 at 3:22 PM #

    @ Well Well

    You are absolutely wrong on that count About the US Embassy does not look and see its neighbors .

    Because of many incidents most infamous of which were the bombing of the US barracks in Beirut in 1983 EVERY PROXIMATE ENTITY, PARTICULARLY THOSE THAT LOVE DIGGING TUNNELS TO YOUR PERIMETER, IS GOING TO BE MONITORED BY ACCOUSTIC, VISUAL & OTHER MEANS.

    Choosing that site for their school would not have been perceived to be accidental by US officials but AUB is not in Wildey now? they’re in Christ Church somewhere close to Silver Sands

    Like

  6. Well Well & Consequences May 23, 2016 at 3:23 PM #

    “So somehow Saba University transitioned from being a non-profit meant to serve the medical education needs of the Netherlands Antilles to a for-profit owned by US private equity firms (and apparently now focused on serving Americans.)”

    GP….the above I got from the Saba article, might be how the med school in Barbados can call itself an American med school. ..if it’s owned by US equity firms, they got private loans from US entities, still has to be checked out though…it always a scam going.

    Like

  7. Well Well & Consequences May 23, 2016 at 3:27 PM #

    Yeah..GP, I remember the truck bombing in Lebanon, they probably checked out the med school already, as I said, if it’s some equity loan scam going between the med school and a US entity, unless US laws are being broken or US citizens complain about the med school, it will be ignored.

    Like

  8. Georgie Porgie May 23, 2016 at 3:28 PM #

    wELL WELL

    there AUA IN ANTIGUA AUC IN ST MARTEN AND NOW AUB

    Like

  9. Georgie Porgie May 23, 2016 at 3:43 PM #

    HERE IS A SNIPET ABOUT AAIMS——THE FIRST MED SCHOOL ON A UWI CAMPUS TERRITORY
    ALL AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF MEDICAL SCIENCES DECLARES THAT IT IS THE PREMIER MEDICAL SCHOOL IN THE CARRIBEAN WHICH PROVIDES EDUCATION PAR EXCELLENCE!
    ALL AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF MEDICAL SCIENCES BEGAN TEACHING ON JANUARY 11 2011T
    IT HAS TAKEN FIVE WHOLE YEARS FOR THEM TO BE ABLE TO ADVERTISE {AND don’t THEY LIKE TO ADVERTISE} THAT

    2 STUDENTS HAVE PASSED BOTH STEP 1 & STEP 2CS
    1 OF THESE STUDENTS HAS ALSO PASSED STEP 2CK

    IN 5 YEARS 13 STUDENTS HAVE PASSED STEP 1
    IS THIS THE TRACK RECORD TO EXPECT FROM A SCHOOL THAT IT IS THE PREMIER MEDICAL SCHOOL IN THE CARRIBEAN WHICH PROVIDES EDUCATION PAR EXCELLENCE!
    CHECK IT FOR YOURSELF AT AAIMS (All American Institue of Medical Sciences)
    JUST SCROLL RIGHT DOWN TO THE RIGHT OF THE PAGEI OF THE 13 STUDENTS WHO HAVE PASSED STEP 1 BEGAN STUDIES AT AAIMS IN MAY 2011———5 YEARS!

    I OF THE 2 STUDENTS WHO HAVE PASSED BOTH STEP 1 & STEP 2CS BEGAN STUDIES AT AAIMS IN MAY 2011———5 YEARS!

    THIS PREMIER MEDICAL EDUCATION AT AAIMS DEFINITELY TAKES TIME ah lie?

    1 of the 5 students who started at AAIMS IN MAY 2011 LEFT AFTER THE FIRST TERM AND WENT TO ANOTHER SCHOOL IN ST VINCENT. HE HAS LONG SINCE PASSED
    THE STEP EXAMS AND IS IN RESIDENCY. Reports are that he was by far the worse of these 5 students who started in May 2011.

    None of the 6 students who started at AAIMS in January 2011 have passed anything.They have all left the premier education at AAIMS. i of these and 1 from the second class and MANY from subsequent classes have been seen at Medical Schools in Guyana.

    This is the plain truth– IT CAN NOT BE REFUTED.
    MORE ON AAIMS LATER

    Like

  10. Georgie Porgie May 23, 2016 at 3:44 PM #

    ADVICE FOR BAJAN PARENTS SEEKING TO SEND THEIR STUDENTS TO SCHOOLS LIKE AUB EVEN IF THE TUITION IS WAVED

    Where Do International Medical Graduates Fit in the US Healthcare Picture?
    Advertisements

    Page 1 of 8.

    I found the following article by Leigh Page. Where Do International Medical Graduates Fit in the US Healthcare Picture? Medscape. Feb 03, 2016. and thought I’d share.

    Where Do International Medical Graduates Fit in the US Healthcare Picture?

    Is the Need for Foreign Graduates Changing?

    International medical graduates (IMGs)—physicians with degrees from foreign medical schools—may be facing some fundamental challenges in their role in the US healthcare system.

    For more than half a century, there has been a mutually beneficial relationship between IMGs and the residency training system. Programs have more positions than US graduates, so IMGs are needed to fill in the gap. For their part, IMGs are attracted to a US healthcare system that may often be more advanced than their own. Though many IMGs go back home after training, many others apply for residency positions to get into the US system.

    IMGs have been able to count on a relatively abundant number of residency positions that can’t be filled by US graduates. In academic year 2014-2015, for example, there were 21.7% more slots than US seniors, according to a November 2015 report[1]published by some top physician-supply experts in the New England Journal of Medicine.

    In the future, however, it may be harder for IMGs to get those positions, owing to a huge increase in the number of US medical school graduates, the authors wrote. Since 2002, 16 new allopathic and 15 new osteopathic medical schools have opened in the United States, and many existing schools have expanded class sizes. By the time all of the new US students get through the pipeline, medical school enrollment in the states will have risen by almost 50%, they wrote.

    The problem for IMGs is that it’s hard to grow the number of residency positions to meet this surge, so that they can have the same number of slots as before. Medicare, the chief funder of residency positions, hasn’t increased the number of funded positions since 1997.

    However, the situation for IMGs isn’t as dire as many people think, the authors reported. Although Medicare lags, other funding sources are stepping up to the plate. For example, a bill passed by Congress in 2014 to reform the Veterans Health Administration will provide 1500 more training slots. As a result, the authors forecasted that the proportion of slots available to non-US graduates would indeed shrink, but is far from disappearing—dropping from 21.7% of positions in 2014-2015 to 13.5% by 2023-2024.

    So far, however, the big squeeze on IMGs has yet to materialize. The National Resident Matching Program reported[2] that the 2015 Match offered a record number of positions and was the best ever for IMGs, and the match rate for US-citizen IMGs was the highest since 2005.

    But as US schools continue to increase their graduating classes, IMGs are expected to feel the pinch. Furthermore, IMGs from many foreign schools could become completely locked out of the US system in the next decade. The Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG) has announced[3] that in 2023, it will require all applicants to have graduated from schools that have been accredited by standards that are equivalent to those used for US schools. To achieve this standard, the ECFMG will be evaluating accreditors for hundreds of schools around the world.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. FearPlay May 23, 2016 at 3:45 PM #

    This must be akin to Trump University!

    Like

  12. Georgie Porgie May 23, 2016 at 3:46 PM #

    s the Need for Foreign Graduates Changing?
    Page 2 of 8:

    I found the following article by Leigh Page. Where Do International Medical Graduates Fit in the US Healthcare Picture? Medscape. Feb 03, 2016. and thought I’d share.

    Where Do International Medical Graduates Fit in the US Healthcare Picture?

    Is the Need for Foreign Graduates Changing?

    Even today, when there’s a relative abundance of residency slots for them, IMGs still have to clear a set of hurdles to break into the US system, and only a minority of applicants will succeed.

    First, they have to take the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE), testing them for a somewhat different style of medicine than they were used to back home. What’s more, many IMGs who are citizens of other countries (foreign IMGs [FIMGs]) have to take the test in an unfamiliar language.

    All IMGs who pass the USMLE have to be accepted to the ECFMG, which verifies their medical education and issues certificates based on USMLE performance. Only about one half of ECFMG applicants get certified.

    After ECFMG certification, IMGs have to be accepted into a US residency program. Again, only about one half get a residency slot, according to the National Resident Matching Program, which oversees placement of applicants into residency programs.

    FIMGs have the further burden of being unknown entities when they apply for residency programs. In many cases, they haven’t had a US clerkship and may not know a US physician willing to write them a recommendation letter, both of which are important criteria for the program directors choosing positions.

    Because they’re almost completely unknown, IMGs have to stand out in some way—which usually means being “academic rock stars,” according to Geoffrey A. Talmon, MD, director of the pathology program at the University of Nebraska Medical Center.

    For these reasons, FIMG applicants need to have higher scores on the USMLE than US graduates. A 2009 study[4] found that FIMGs have higher scores than USIMGs on Step 1 and Step 2 (Clinical Knowledge)—though not on Step 2 (Clinical Skills), which includes tests of spoken English and communication skills.

    FIMGs may even outperform US graduates when they enter medical practice. A 2010 peer-reviewed study[5] found that among patients with congestive heart failure and acute myocardial infarction, those treated by FIMGs had lower mortality rates than those treated by graduates of US medical schools. The study was led by John J. Norcini, PhD, president and CEO of the Foundation for Advancement of International Medical Education and Research, which consists of organizations that certify the competency of US doctors. These groups include the Federation of State Medical Boards, the National Board of Medical Examiners, the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), and the American Board of Medical Specialties.

    “We have been blessed with the cream of the crop of the doctors from other countries,” says Dr Norcini, who previously oversaw clinical evaluation at the American Board of Internal Medicine.

    Like

  13. Georgie Porgie May 23, 2016 at 3:48 PM #

    Where Do International Medical Graduates Fit in the US Healthcare Picture?

    Breaking Into the US System Has Always Been Hard

    IMGs often have to take extra steps to ensure entry into the US system. Busharat Ahmad, MD, a retired ophthalmologist who helped found the IMG Section of the American Medical Association (AMA) in the 1990s, recalls that he didn’t get into the US system in one easy step.

    Dr Ahmad was part of the first great wave of IMGs into the US in the 1950s. He came here hoping to train in ophthalmology after graduating from the University of Karachi in Pakistan in 1956. “I got a couple of responses, but no dice,” he recalls. He was told it was impossible for an IMG to get into a US ophthalmology program. However, he tried a program in London and was accepted there. On the strength of the British diploma, he was able to get into an ophthalmology program in St Louis and, finally, into one at Harvard.

    Getting into the US system is still a difficult task for IMGs today. Because their educational backgrounds are often viewed here as being unclear, and because they often lack a favorable letter of recommendation from a US physician, “It’s harder to get a sense of their medical reasoning abilities and procedural skill sets from the standard outside documentation,” says Dr Talmon, the pathology program director.

    “So when we look at foreign-national IMGs,” he continues, “we tend to look at only the very best.” These applicants have very high USMLE scores and high grades, or have done research work at a world-class institution. Many other program directors feel this way, too. A 2010 study[6] found that when psychiatry and family practice programs were given identical applications, they were 80% more likely to respond to US seniors than to IMGs.

    The higher bar for FIMGs means they have to work harder and do more. Writing in 2011, Kenneth Christopher, MD, a nephrologist who is assistant director of the Preliminary Residency Program at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, estimated that whereas most US seniors take about 4 weeks to study for Step 1 of the USMLE, some IMGs study for 2 focused years.[7]

    Carl Shusterman, an immigration-law attorney in Los Angeles, reports that many FIMGs arrive in the US on student visas 2 years before applying for programs, so that they can take prep courses for the USMLE at such companies as Kaplan. They also try to get paid observerships and externships at hospitals, so that they can gain some clinical experience and make contacts with physicians. In addition, they may take research positions in the United States as another way to stand out when they contact program directors.

    But many don’t make it. “I spent close to US $18,000 [and] wasted 2 years,” a Pakistani IMG who failed to get a match wrote[8] on a website for IMGs in 2013. “My fiancée of 5 years almost left me and it was very hard convincing her to stay.”
    Doc

    Like

  14. Well Well & Consequences May 23, 2016 at 3:51 PM #

    There you go GP…their funding have to be coming from the US lenders…unless they break a US tax law or US students get dissatified and report them, they will stick around and milk everyone.

    I noticed they were in different jurisdictions…students and their parents have to beware….buyer bewsre.

    Like

  15. Georgie Porgie May 23, 2016 at 3:54 PM #

    PAG 4 OF 8 FOR SMART BAJANS HOPING TO PRACTICE MEDICINE IN THE USA BY ATTENDING BOGUS OFFSHORE MEDICAL SCHOOLS
    Where Do International Medical Graduates Fit in the US Healthcare Picture?

    Shut Out of the System for Good

    Whereas many IMGs go back home after they fail to get a residency position, many others stay in America. In many cases, their spouses are US citizens or hold green cards, or they’ve obtained refugee status, according to José Ramón Fernández-Peña, MD, associate professor of health education at San Francisco State University.

    Dr Fernández-Peña, an IMG from Mexico who made it into the US system, is the founder of the Welcome Back Initiative, a nonprofit organization that helps doctors and other healthcare professionals educated abroad find work here. Despite their healthcare training in their native countries, most of these people wind up doing menial work when they arrive in the United States, such as driving taxis or working as janitors, Dr Fernández-Peña says. “Highly trained people are sitting around unable to use their expertise. It’s a great waste of brainpower.”

    Welcome Back helps many participants find healthcare work, but it’s much harder to help foreign doctors get into their profession. Of more than 4600 foreign-trained physicians who have participated in Welcome Back, only 130 have subsequently won US residency slots, Dr Fernández-Peña reports. That translates to a success rate of under 3%.

    These IMGs get shut out of the system quickly, often because they didn’t understand how it works, Dr Fernández-Peña says. For example, many decided to take the USMLE without adequate study. If they fail, they can try again, but the initial score goes onto their permanent record. Even if they score well later, their chances of getting into a residency are almost zero.

    Dr Fernández-Peña helped found a free program for Spanish-speaking IMGs at the University of California, Los Angeles. Entrants get test-preparation courses and clinical observerships to help them get into the US system, and in return, they agree to spend 2-3 years in family medicine programs that treat underserved populations. But owing to the cost of the program, just a few slots are available, which hardly puts a dent in the need for Hispanic doctors in California. Dr Fernández-Peña says that although 35% of Californians are Latino, only 5% of California doctors share their ethnicity.

    Doctors from the Middle East are another group of IMGs who fall into limbo here, according to Wael Al-Delaimy, MD, an Iranian IMG who works in the Department of Family Medicine and Public Health at the University of California, San Diego.

    Many of these IMGs “came here in mid-career as refugees with a green card,” he says. “They had no job and no income, and that’s devastating on multiple fronts. Imagine, you were the lead surgeon at home and now you have become an assistant to an assistant.” He tries to find contacts for these doctors with US training programs—he helped host a jobs forum for about 50 FIMGs last year—but he says it remains an uphill struggle for these doctors.

    Like

  16. Well Well & Consequences May 23, 2016 at 3:55 PM #

    *buyer beware…

    Trump has a court case in November for that scam university, he robbed thousands of students who actually tookm out loans to fund another of Trump’s scams, they are horribly greedy and would rob their mothers…these scam artists.

    Like

  17. Georgie Porgie May 23, 2016 at 3:57 PM #

    PAGE 5 0F 8 FOR SMART ALEC BAJANS WANTING TO ATTEND BOGUS OFFSHORE SCHOOLS
    Gaining Entry Via Caribbean Schools
    Page 5 of 8:

    I found the following article by Leigh Page. Where Do International Medical Graduates Fit in the US Healthcare Picture? Medscape. Feb 03, 2016. and thought I’d share.

    Where Do International Medical Graduates Fit in the US Healthcare Picture?

    Gaining Entry Via Caribbean Schools

    An increasing number of IMGs entering the US system are US citizens, mostly from medical schools in the Caribbean. The oldest Caribbean schools—St George’s University School of Medicine and Ross University—were founded in the late 1970s, when it was becoming more difficult to get into US medical schools. Students with grade point averages and scores on the Medical College Admission Test that would have gotten them into US schools only a few years earlier found themselves shut out.

    Today, the competition for enrollment in US medical schools may be even more intense. The AAMC reported[9] in 2013 that a record number of people applied to US medical schools, yet despite an increase in the number of positions available, only 41% of applicants were accepted. About 28,000 students who had planned a medical career were turned away from US schools.

    Some of these students apply to Caribbean schools, which have been growing rapidly. The ECFMG’s 2014 Annual Report[4] shows that the number of ECFMG applicants from Caribbean schools doubled from 2000 to 2013, and USIMGs now account for almost one third of ECFMG certificates.

    Fully 31 medical schools in the Caribbean cater to US students, and the flow of graduates back to the United States has been growing, according to the AAMC report. The quality of Caribbean schools varies. A peer-reviewed study[10] of Caribbean schools led by Dr Norcini found that the rate of a school’s graduates getting ECFMG certificates ranged from 28% to 86%. Many of the established Caribbean schools, such as Ross and St George’s, were at the top end.

    Working Hard to Erase a Stigma

    Caribbean schools have been champing at the bit to prove their quality. Accreditors of Caribbean schools have been at the forefront of qualifying for the ECFMG’s new accreditation standards. In 2015, with the deadline for approval still 8 years away, the ECFMG announced[11] that the accrediting body for several Caribbean schools was one of only three accreditors to be approved so far.

    USIMGs have a leg up on graduates from other foreign schools because their schools closely imitate US schools. The USIMGs’ schools have basically the same curricula, employ US-trained faculty, and even send their students to clinical clerkships in the states. They tend to go to clerkships in New York State, where the state Department of Health takes on the unusual role of monitoring the quality of these clerkships.

    In US clerkships, students can audition for US-based physicians, who may write letters of recommendation for them for training programs. FIMGs, in contrast, rarely are able to enter US clerkships and are always struggling to find US doctors who could recommend them.

    US program directors who screen applicants for the crucial step of residency training like being able to assess an education similar to that of US graduates, says Dr Talmon. “I don’t treat USIMGs any differently than medical students from US schools,” he says. “When they come into the program, I can’t tell the difference from the US graduates.”

    Program directors’ greater familiarity with USIMGs’ experiences may explain why USIMGs have somewhat better odds of being matched to a residency program than do FIMGs: 53.1% for USIMGs in 2015 compared with 49.4% of FIMGs, the ECFMG reports.[12]

    Whereas some program directors require a minimum score on the USMLE—typically around 230 or 240 out of a perfect score of 300—Dr Talmon isn’t so hung up on scores. “The USMLE was initially designed as kind of a driver’s license test, in which passing or failing was the important thing,” he says. “If you get just a few answers wrong, it can have a huge impact on your score.”

    According to recent statistics, USIMGs fit very well into US workforce needs. When they go into practice, they fill in the gaps in primary care even better than FIMGs or DOs. A 2013 report[13] found that 56.7% of Caribbean-educated USIMGs chose a primary care specialty, compared with 54.0% of osteopathic graduates, 42.3% of non-Caribbean IMGs, and 32.9% of graduates from US allopathic schools.

    Like

  18. Georgie Porgie May 23, 2016 at 4:00 PM #

    Page 6 of 8:

    I found the following article by Leigh Page. Where Do International Medical Graduates Fit in the US Healthcare Picture? Medscape. Feb 03, 2016. and thought I’d share.
    Where Do International Medical Graduates Fit in the US Healthcare Picture?

    Having a Limited Set of Choices

    When IMGs actually get into residency, they find that their career choices are decidedly more limited than for US graduates. According to the physician-supply experts writing[1] in the New England Journal of Medicine, the way the US system works is that IMGs get very little specialty choice so that US seniors can have much more specialty choice.

    US seniors enjoy a “selection subsidy,” the authors wrote. IMGs take the less competitive positions in primary care, and as a result, US seniors have improved chances of getting highly competitive positions in such areas as surgery. The US students wouldn’t have such a wide choice if there were just enough positions for them alone. In other words, in a zero-sum system, they would have to take a certain percentage of primary care slots or not get anything at all.

    There has been a wide gap between IMGs’ specialties and those of US seniors. In the 2015 Match, 39% of US seniors chose primary care, and those who chose internal medicine often plan to subspecialize. Meanwhile, fully 67% of IMGs filled primary care spots. For many of them, it was the only way to get into the US system. In some cases, the specialties they had practiced in their home countries were different from the ones they were able to get into here.

    Most IMGs seem to make the best of this lack of specialty choice and enjoy a career in their assigned specialty, but some do not. A study[14] of family physicians found that being an IMG was a key predictor of dissatisfaction with the specialty.

    When many IMGs in internal medicine try to subspecialize, the choices again are limited. Fellowships in some subspecialties are less IMG-friendly than others. An analysis[15] of 2012 Match data found that although infectious diseases was the easiest subspecialty for all applicants to get into, on the basis of the ratio of applications to acceptances, it was the third hardest for IMGs. And although allergy was the sixth hardest for all applicants to get into, it was the hardest of all for IMGs.

    Nephrology, on the other hand, was the second easiest for everyone and the easiest of all for IMGs. Nevertheless, nephrology wasn’t the first choice for many of the IMGs going into it. In a separate 2012 study,[16] 23% of IMG nephrologists didn’t choose the specialty, compared with 11% of US graduates

    Even after training, many FIMGs again put aside what they want to do and agree to work in remote areas of the United States. Left to their own devices, FIMGs tend to gravitate to large urban areas, where they can congregate with other people from their country, but they agree to serve in remote areas because that’s the only way they can stay in America.

    The J-1 visas that are issued to FIMGs during training require them to go back to their home countries for 2 years after their training is completed. Apparently most of them do go back home—after all, many of them came here just for the training. But J-1 holders can get the requirement waived if they agree to work in an underserved area in the United States for a few years in several different programs. There are a limited number of such positions, and the competition for them is often very intense.

    As one might expect, working in small-town America can be quite lonely for a newly arrived foreigner. In his book My Own Country, Abraham Verghese, MD, recounts serving as a resident in Johnson City, Tennessee, where he was virtually the only person from India. He recalled going to the local bar to drink with one of his few friends, the mechanic who worked on his car. Afterward, Dr Verghese entered an infectious diseases fellowship in Boston. But interestingly, when he finally had a choice of where to practice, he decided to return to Johnson City. He turned out to be invaluable to the community, fighting the AIDS epidemic when it had just arrived in the area.

    Like

  19. Georgie Porgie May 23, 2016 at 4:00 PM #

    Page 7 of 8:

    I found the following article by Leigh Page. Where Do International Medical Graduates Fit in the US Healthcare Picture? Medscape. Feb 03, 2016. and thought I’d share.

    Where Do International Medical Graduates Fit in the US Healthcare Picture?

    Meeting Cultural Challenges

    Meeting Cultural Challenges

    Graduates from India are still the largest IMG group in the United States, representing 20.7% of the total, according to the AMA’s IMG Section.[17] However, there has been a decline in the number of new candidates from India and a rise in the number of USIMGs, according to a recent speech[18] by the ECFMG’s president.

    Even so, FIMGs still make up the lion’s share of the American IMG population. In addition to India, the top countries of origin for FIMGs are Pakistan, China, the Philippines, Iran, and Israel, according to the AMA’s IMG Section.

    When Alok A. Khorana, MD, an Indian IMG, arrived at a US residency program in 1996, it was a massive culture shock. “I had never used a pager or answered a page, never looked up labs on a computer screen, never dictated a note, never been exposed to American patients’ expectations of privacy and medical information, never dealt with discharge planning or nursing home placement or insurance issues,” he recalled in an article[19] in Health Affairs.

    He had already been responsible for treating patients at his medical school in India, so his clinical experience was vastly greater than that of his US peers, but when he treated his first patient, he was stumped. She needed something for her pain, and the nurse on duty suggested Tylenol, but Dr Khorana had never heard of Tylenol. He realized then that he had many more things to learn. He easily made it through residency, but he faults his program (and most others) for failing to provide an orientation course for IMGs.

    Most FIMGs also have to struggle with language. Since all of them had to pass the Spoken English Proficiency component of the USMLE, they can speak and understand English very well, but “the ability to communicate goes beyond the ability to speak and write English,” according to an opinion piece[20] published by the American College of Physicians. “Accents, slang terminology, street language, and idioms all influence the communication between physician and patients as well as hospital staff,” wrote Barbara L. Schuster, MD, a former American College of Physicians regent.

    “It’s easier for people like me, because I’ve spoken English all my life, even in medical school,” Dr Ahmad says, “but I know I still have an accent.” (His English is usually quite clear, but when he said he had studied at Harvard, it sounded like he said “Howard.”) “Also, there is a different kind of English spoken here, so you have to learn the lingo,” he says.

    FIMGs can take courses to improve their language skills. According to the “medical accent reduction” page[21] on the website of G.E.T. English Training in Dallas, “there is a big difference between a language barrier and an accent barrier. If you are frequently asked to repeat yourself, you are a candidate for accent reduction.”

    Dr Ahmad, a dignified man of patrician bearing, became a kind of George Washington figure for IMGs in the AMA. In the late 1980s, he served on an AMA committee that planned an IMG advisory committee and became its chair when it was launched in 1989. And when it became a full-fledged AMA section in 1997, he became the section’s first chair.

    For 2 or 3 years after the World Trade Center attacks on September 11, 2001, Dr Ahmad reports, it was hard for IMGs from such countries as Pakistan to get visa clearances from the US Department of State.

    Like

  20. Georgie Porgie May 23, 2016 at 4:01 PM #

    age 8 of 8:

    I found the following article by Leigh Page. Where Do International Medical Graduates Fit in the US Healthcare Picture? Medscape. Feb 03, 2016. and thought I’d share.

    Where Do International Medical Graduates Fit in the US Healthcare Picture?

    The Struggle to Get Promoted

    IMGs have a conflicting sense of self-worth in America, says ***** G. Chen, MD, a researcher at the RAND Corporation who has studied the IMG experience extensively. “As a doctor, you’re in a high-prestige position, but as an IMG, you may be viewed as an outsider by some of your patients and some of your colleagues,” says Dr Chen, whose own parents were highly educated immigrants.

    According to a 2012 study[22] that Dr Chen led, IMGs report lower satisfaction with their careers. Whereas 82.3% of US graduates reported career satisfaction, 75.7% of IMGs did so. The study was unable to identify why this is, but some light was shed on this in an earlier anecdotal study[23] led by Dr Chen, in which several IMGs were interviewed. In that study, a family physician from Southeast Asia working at a large organization said that few IMGs reach the top, and their work is “not validated” by the organization.

    Someone who has had these kinds of experiences is Bhushan Pandya, MD, chairman-elect of the AMA’s IMG Section and a gastroenterologist in Danville, Virginia. When he arrived in Danville in 1985, he was one of the first IMGs in the area, and his application for privileges at the local hospital was “delayed and delayed,” he recalls. Only with the help of a lawyer was he finally able to get on staff. He then joined the same hospital credentials committee that had balked at granting him privileges and eventually became its chair. As the new evaluator of applications for privileges, “I made sure that everyone was treated equally,” he says.

    Dr Pandya’s easygoing manner and willingness to promote change from the inside no doubt helped make him popular with colleagues. He became the first IMG president of the medical staff, and currently he’s president-elect of the Medical Society of Virginia. Again, he’s the first IMG to hold the position. “It’s to the credit of the establishment that they elected me,” he says.

    Like Dr Ahmad, Dr Pandya is a steadfast advocate of assimilation. When he arrived in Danville, he was told, “Everyone here has roots in Danville,” he recalls. “I may not have roots here,” he replied, “but my grandchildren will.”

    Dr Pandya believes there’s less discrimination against IMGs within medicine than when Dr Ahmad formed the IMG Section two decades ago. Last year, when leaders of the section met with the AMA president, “nobody was talking about discrimination,” he says. The subjects were the usual ones for other physicians: electronic medical records, the move to the 10th edition of the International Classification of Diseases, and the new payment methodologies.

    “Many of us have been able to establish ourselves in mainstream medicine,” Dr Pandya says. “After all, we represent 25% of the physician workforce.”

    Like

  21. Well Well & Consequences May 26, 2016 at 5:07 AM #

    GP…I see Carol Haynes is taking issue with AUB setting up their own clinics on the island, she apparently much prefers polyclinics have the doctors, to ease the current problems, it would make for better supervising and monitoring of what these doctors ae getting up to.

    http://www.nationnews.com/nationnews/news/81643/concern-shortage-intern-spaces

    The politicians are such shithounds with the intelligence level of goldfish…ya dont know what promises the idiots made or contracts they signed.

    Like

  22. Georgie Porgie May 26, 2016 at 8:32 AM #

    The basic problem in the polyclinics is that the doctors dont come to work on time and that some attend their practices before turning up.

    Dr Jacobs is moaning about the fact that we dont have enough spots for interns at QEH. GOVERNMENT DOES NOT HAVE THE MONEY? NEITHER THE DOLLARS OR THE SENSE LITERALLY

    Like

  23. David May 26, 2016 at 8:34 AM #

    @GP

    I’d we don’t have the money to place interns why not reduce the intake from the UWI by increasing tuition and economic cost?

    Like

  24. Georgie Porgie May 26, 2016 at 10:01 AM #

    dONT THINK THAT IS A GOOD OPTION
    WE NEED TO FIND THE MONEY
    WE NEED THE SERVICES
    WE NEED THE DOCTORS
    I THINK INTERNS COULD PROBABLY DO A ROTATION THROUGH THE POLYCLINICS UNDER SUPERVISION

    I AM NOT FOR THE USE OF OUR POLYCLINICS FOR THE TRAINING OF OFFSHORE MEDICAL STUDENTS. WE HAVE ONE SCHOOL ALREADY AND SOON THERE WILL BE 3 OR 4 LIKE ST LUCIA AND STKITTS
    WHERE WILL IT END

    IF THEY WANT TO BRING IN LONG STAY TOURISTS FOR 2 YEARS …OK
    BUT LET THEM STAY OUT OF OUR HEALTH BUISNESS EXCEPT FOR PROVIDING FUNDS OR EQUIPMENT OR MATERIALS

    Like

  25. David May 26, 2016 at 3:24 PM #

    If we go by the braying from Harry Husbands who is the parliamentary secretary in Education more medical schools will be approved shortly. To be expected the focus is on the economic considerations, spending, housing, etc. What about the concerns raised by GP? No mention of it!

    Like

  26. Georgie Porgie May 26, 2016 at 3:51 PM #

    David
    I learned longtime that the only benefit of offshore schools to the hosts island is the INFLUX OF LONGSTAY (2 years) STUDENT TOURIST. What will happen is that many more rentals of apartments, houses will occur, and rents will rise alarmingly. This will also affect the ability of the populace to get reasonable places to rent.

    In St Kitts it was easy for me to rent a fairly well fiited out apartment next to OTI for EC 500 in 2002. In 2008 the cost had more than tripled to US600, and it was difficult to find a place.

    It is amazing that the government of Rarotonga in the Cooks refused SPSOM a charter to operate when I presented the facts about bogus offshore medical schools to their PM in an email. In contrast, we are hearing lots of rubbish in Barbados– a much richer country.

    Do not expect them to discuss the issues I raised. These guys will be getting cut backs for them and their friends. They ought to understand that medical students, though tourists in a sense, will be spending much less than they expect.

    Like

  27. David May 26, 2016 at 4:30 PM #

    Harry Husbands made mention of:

    1.Queen’s University School of Medicine 2.Barbados International School of Medicine 3.Washington University School of Medicine

    Like

  28. Brathwaite May 26, 2016 at 4:37 PM #

    Wait we really doing here wid this one? Of course dem politricans get dem cut and all that.

    So let dem students bring some money to the economy, den I don’t has to sell my piecea propraty.

    Are bajans going to get treat like gerbils or mice in a test environment by these wannabe docs? What exactly is the problem?

    I not hearing that there is a direct threat to us bajans healthcare.

    I hearing that people going mek some money and we need to mek real sure that everything is copecetate wid the certification and all dat but it don’t seem to be no killer docs on de loose.

    Like

  29. Georgie Porgie May 26, 2016 at 6:05 PM #

    David
    Here is a very interesting article by Heidi Chumley the executive dean and chief academic officer, American University of the Caribbean School of Medicine (AUC)- one of the so called big three offshore schools.

    U.S. medical school graduates aren’t enough to fill the physician shortage

    Every year around Match Day, medical and pre-med students alike worry about a rumored “residency cliff.” The theory is that the number of new medical school graduates will soon outstrip the existing inventory of residency positions, and the overflow applicants will be left in professional limbo.

    While that picture seems scary, it’s time for some good news. I’ve believed for years that this concern is more phantom than real, but now there is empirical evidence in the form of a data analysis by a respected source in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM).

    Dr. Fitzhugh Mullan, a longtime observer of physician workforce trends, published a report in the NEJM examining recent and projected growth of U.S. medical school enrollment, compared to the rate of increase in residency program positions. Mullan concludes that while the number of graduates has begun catching up with the number of available positions, this gap is narrowing very slowly. In 2024, the number of available residency slots will still exceed the number of U.S. medical school graduates by around 4,500. That means an ample supply of postgraduate training positions for new MDs from not only U.S. schools but deserving international medical graduates as well.

    Put another way, residency positions are gradually becoming more competitive, but this is no reason to abandon a dream of becoming a physician; especially not when we as a nation face a growing shortage of physicians.

    A 2015 study puts this physician shortfall at as many as 90,000 doctors by the year 2025. This number helps put America’s health care problems into perspective. While U.S.-based medical schools are slowly increasing enrollment, they cannot alone make up the gap in the physician workforce. So do we then look to recruit doctors away from Africa, Asia or Latin America, contributing to the “brain drain” from less affluent countries? Thankfully we don’t have to.

    Physician Shortage-temp.jpg

    Many strong candidates are turned away from U.S. medical schools due to a lack of capacity and the resulting arbitrary cut-offs. International medical schools like mine — with a student body made up of mostly of U.S. citizens planning to practice in the U.S. — are doing their part to address the physician shortage by making more room for qualified American applicants. Many of my school’s graduates go on to become primary care physicians or to care for underserved populations — and some do both.

    Detractors of Caribbean medical schools have often exploited pre-med students’ residency anxiety to frighten them away. Mullan’s important report in NEJM should help lay that to rest.

    Like

  30. Georgie Porgie May 26, 2016 at 6:08 PM #

    HOWEVER THIS NOTE BY A ST GEORGE STUDENT ____ THE NUMBER ONE OOFSHORE SCHOOL EMPHASISES THE PROBLEMS THAT EVEN US CITIZENS WHO COME TO THESE SCHOOLS HAVE IN GETTING A JOB AFTER THEY GRADUATE< EVEN IF HIGH STEP SCORES

    Article excludes the amount of DO schools out there. And the amount of residency programs that want fully trained FMGS as cheap labor for 3 years.

    Despite all this reassurance. The Caribbean choice is gone. I graduated from SGU this year. Scored 230’s/220’s/CS no failures. Didn’t fail any of my classes, and graduated within 4 years. I applied to a 100 Psychiatry places to get 12 invites. A DO in my situation would apply to around 20 places and get 12 invites. They probably don’t even take the USMLE, but instead take the inferior COMLEX. Trust me… An average on Comlex is 500, and translates to around 210s on Step 1 (which is 50%tile on Comlex to like bottom 10-20%s on Step 1) Also they do rotations at non-greenbook places at a private practice with no real training (they will brag about doing IM rotations or Surgery rotations with no calls or weekends). So at the end of all this situation, I didn’t match. The majority of my places I interviewed ended up ranking DO’s/US MD’s higher. I know of 4 others in my situation from SGU and AUC that didn’t match Psychiatry this year with similar amount of interviews. I am also a US Citizen. As of right now, I am living at my parents place, applying to jobs. BTW it’s pretty tough to explain why a MD is applying for an entry job. I will be more then excited for a job now that just pays 40k a year. If I leave out my MD, I would have to explain 4 years gap in my resume.

    I don’t have a problem with the Top 3 Caribbean school. The island living conditions are a lot better then what some might say. Administration, and setting up my clinical rotations was no hassle. The biggest issue is that DO’s are appearing like rabbits, and they won the PR battle. A DO with 200s/210s are preferred over a SGU grad with 220s/230s. Also the DO can probably fail a test or two, and still match. We are discriminated heavily against. Some will say the only reason why we are in the Caribbeans are due to personality flaws. You score bad on the Steps… They assume that you aren’t intelligent enough to be a doctor in the first place, and that’s why you went to a different country for medical school. You do alright on the Steps… they assume you have personality flaws.

    I am warning people to avoid Caribbeans, not because of the school or even the quality of education. It’s the huge discrimination you will receive. Sometimes people will make you feel less then human, and more akin to an animal. In my rotations I notice some malignant places know the situation you are in as a IMG, so they will treat you worse then the DO’s/MD’s. If the same attending treat your colleagues worse, they will report to school, and pull out of the rotation slots. As an IMG, you keep quiet, because the school is trying to maintain as much rotation slots as they can.

    Of course Heidi Chumley is going to say this on her article. It’s because she is the executive dean and chief academic officer of AUC. She has a bias in maintaining the school is not falling.

    For the love of God, don’t come to the Caribbean schools. It use to be you score 210’s or 220’s your chances of matching is solid (no guarantees of course, because nothing in life is guaranteed). Now the chances of matching is reduced, and more people are slipping. In fact I know someone with 210’s not matching FM this year, all he had was 3 interviews and he applied to a 100 places, US Citizen from SGU also. No fails BTW.

    Normally I would keep quiet, but I just want to warn people out there. There are already tons of posts, but they are from Canadians that need J1 or people with failures. Well I am a US citizen with no failures, that didn’t match with decent scores. Hindsight I shouldn’t have done this. I should have done PA school or honestly tried for DO. Around 2012 when I matriculated it use to be SGU = DO. There was some places that preferred us, and main reason for DO was the private match. Now it’s automatic DO>>>>>>>Top 3 no matter what. Even a brand new for private like RVU have a better reputation then us.

    There will be some old school IMGs that say it’s still viable, but that’s before DO’s were this prolific. Also, you will hear some stories about some people with low scores matching, but remember… What happens when you don’t match? So just a counterpoint to this article.

    Like

  31. Georgie Porgie May 26, 2016 at 6:11 PM #

    THIS ARTICLE FROM BARBADOS TODAY EMPHASISES WHY WE CANT HAVE CUBAN TRAINED DOCTORS RUNNING AMOCK IN BARBADOS

    Sir Henry defends policy towards Cuban-trained doctors
    Added by Sandy Deane on May 26, 2016.
    Saved under Health Care, Local News

    inShare
    Barbadian doctors who receive their medical training in Cuba must be prepared to sit the Caribbean Association of Medical Councils (CAMC) examination to practise locally, Independent Senator Professor Sir Henry Fraser insisted today.

    Amid public calls for clarity on the treatment of the Cuban-trained doctors, Sir Henry, a former Dean of the Faculty of Medical Sciences at the University of the West Indies, attempted to explain the issue during debate on the Caribbean Accreditation Authority Education in Medicine and Other Health Professions (Incorporation) Bill, 2016 in the Upper House.

    Sir Henry said the challenges would be best resolved if Cuban authorities worked with the Caribbean Accreditation Authority for Education in Medicine and other Health Professions (CAAM-HP).

    He noted that while Cuba has an outstanding record in public health care, some aspects of its medical training were found wanting.

    “Cuba’s great reputation for medical training lies in its excellent public health programme and not in the clinical skills with which the students graduate. There are so many students being trained in Cuba and so many nurses, and the health system is so well provided for in so many areas that their students graduated apparently without the ability to set up an intravenous line or to take a blood sample or to do other clinical procedures our students are all taught to do during the medical course and which practising doctors in Barbados must be able to do,” he told fellow senators.

    The retired doctor insisted that the medical faculty at the UWI had developed its training programme to the highest standards and “to be oriented towards the society of Barbados, towards the diseases that are particularly prevalent in Barbados and towards issues that are both medical, social and financial”.

    Sir Henry said Cuban graduates who took the examinations in Jamaica had relatively low pass rates when compared to international students and the entry requirement for Cuban medical schools were below the standard requirement for students entering the UWI medical faculty.

    “Some students went with CXC [Caribbean Examination Council] results, some students went with A Levels that were not scientific. So you could imagine the challenge these students had studying in Cuba without adequate preparation and background in science subjects.”

    The Professor Emeritus of the University of the West Indies also expressed concern that students who had to spend a year learning Spanish were sent to country hospitals in the eastern end of the island instead of the more established facilities in the capital, Havana.

    “When we interviewed the students, Barbadians and Jamaicans who were studying in Cuba, they all said there was a big difference in the standard of teaching facilities and accommodation . . . that most of them were constantly applying for transfers in Havana,” he said.

    He further argued it was “particularly disadvantaging to send Barbadians to Cuba for a programme that would take seven years” instead of the five years spent studying here.

    “The simple fact is unless the medical universities in Cuba subject their performance to the CAAM-HP, graduates will continue to have to take the CAMC exams, “ Sir Henry said.

    Like

  32. Hants May 26, 2016 at 8:15 PM #

    THE GASTROENTEROLOGY UNIT of the Queen Elizabeth Hospital has received over $200 000 worth of equipment from the Legacy Foundation Charity.

    http://www.nationnews.com/nationnews/news/81660/charity-makes-donation-hospital#sthash.9bFQGXRS.dpuf

    Like

  33. David May 26, 2016 at 8:18 PM #

    @Hants

    This is good, the QEH needs all the philanthropy it can attract.

    Like

  34. Georgie Porgie May 27, 2016 at 10:39 AM #

    it is noteworthy that valuemd took down my original post there on this topic with my link to BU and banned me from valuemd for a month

    it seems to me that wrong will prevail in this matter

    Like

  35. David May 27, 2016 at 12:09 PM #

    @GP

    What was your original post? Do you have it saved?

    When did you post it?

    Like

  36. Georgie Porgie May 27, 2016 at 12:37 PM #

    Same as original post on this thread on BU
    POSTED IT SUNDAY

    Like

  37. Well Well & Consequences May 27, 2016 at 1:34 PM #

    GP…I thought it was only the lawyers had their secret society.

    Did I not warn you that the equity companies in the US are funding tha AUB scam for the indians…many thousands of them have US citizen relatives who could access the funding, many of those doctors also have US citienship and can access the funding themselves……you do not ever, want to go up against that particular brand of animal.

    That’s the only way they could have survived since the Saba scandal or the whole scam would have been shut down completely.

    Like

  38. Well Well & Consequences May 27, 2016 at 1:38 PM #

    Read it again GP.

    Well Well & Consequences May 23, 2016 at 3:23 PM #
    “So somehow Saba University transitioned from being a non-profit meant to serve the medical education needs of the Netherlands Antilles to a for-profit owned by US private equity firms (and apparently now focused on serving Americans.)”

    GP….the above I got from the Saba article, might be how the med school in Barbados can call itself an American med school. ..if it’s owned by US equity firms, they got private loans from US entities, still has to be checked out though…it always a scam going.

    Well Well & Consequences May 23, 2016 at 3:27 PM #
    Yeah..GP, I remember the truck bombing in Lebanon, they probably checked out the med school already, as I said, if it’s some equity loan scam going between the med school and a US entity, unless US laws are being broken or US citizens complain about the med school, it will be ignored.

    Like

  39. Georgie Porgie May 27, 2016 at 2:22 PM #

    Well well
    I have long understood that offshore medical schools are scams that are about ripping off would be doctors– most of whom don’t belong in medical school.

    At AAIMS in Jamaica they wanted me to go and live off campus, because I WAS TOO CLOSE TO THE STUDENTS……..BECAUSE I CARED TOO MUCH ABOUT THE STUDENTS

    As I said above the only possible benefit of a bogus school to Bim is some increased grocery sales, and increased house rentals with an increase in house rents- which will affect the locals seeking places to rent adversely.

    Barbadians must be vigilant and ensure that they do not use our clinical facilities for their purposes or our people as guinea pigs for the school.

    Instead of trying to defend my post on ValueMD they had it taken down.

    Like

  40. Pieceuhderockyeahright May 27, 2016 at 5:54 PM #

    @ Dr. GP

    Very few people realize the power of social media and the power that it has to obliterate the political and social hegemonies of the world.

    I will not go to the extreme of China regarding its control of the internet, I will not go even to that Rooney fellow with that colossal mistake.

    Let me just remain with something as simple as the picture of Ninjaman at the Top of Broadstreet watching that imaginary TV which was the side of a box with a tv marked on it.

    One uh de people at de church took it so I will ask for it (heheheheheheheh)

    When a man is said to be a buller or a woman a lesbian up until 15 years ago that statement died a natural death or it was only said in hushed tones or Gearbox would repeat it under the influence of rum.

    Enter Social Media.

    You noticed that Chewbacca talking masks thing, it has gone viral over $ million views

    and immediately yu can imagine what this did with Chewbacca sales for the company Kohls?

    This thing in Cyberspace that like the Atom Bomb and Hiroshima and that at Nagasaki.

    It goes out there like a being travelling in 7 dimensions, x, y, z, the future, the past? (for the metaphysicist Hopi) and into being (yet being in GOD, BEING FINITE & INFINITESIMAL, IT DOES NOT TOUCH GOD.)

    It has a power that all people fear

    AND people who are dishonest, PLAYING TO BE HONEST, BECAUSE OF THEIR SECRETS, FEAR IT MOST,

    Oppenheimer states “…I remembered the line from the Hindu scripture, the Bhagavad-Gita; Vishnu is trying to persuade the Prince that he should do his duty and, to impress him, takes on his multi-armed form and says, “Now I am become Death, the destroyer of worlds.”

    I consider the internet like that, a living yet simultaneously inanimate thing, a nothingness that like a surgeon’s scalpel brings life and death, depending on who wields it.

    Here is another plagiarism woeful sinner of cut and paste that i am.

    Claran Cannon Minister in Dublin states “However, in some cases the fear of social media arises from “transfer of communicative power from the few to the many” because of the advent of social media sites.”

    “There are some in the political sphere, both practitioners and media commentators, who are distinctly uncomfortable with this recent transfer of power,” he writes.

    “They are losing control of the “message” and feel challenged, now that the power to communicate with many is no longer the preserve of the few.

    “Some calls for regulation of social media are well intentioned. My fear is that those who would like to regain control of public discourse could exploit the genuinely held concerns of others to do exactly that.”

    Gearbox’s days are gone, Eric Fly, of “in the Name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Ghost” fame (that is the only invocation that nullifies all laws of gathering for a meeting under the constitutuion of Barbados, Eric Fly Sealy and his megaphone will never come again, but the internet is going to be with us until the advent and supplanting by telepathy.

    Post on, my Brother at Arms, post on. the sting of the mamba can kill an elephant, so we must be most venomous to these serpents that walk on two legs amongst us,

    Like

  41. Georgie Porgie May 27, 2016 at 8:42 PM #

    Hants
    What was posted there is quite true about Value MD
    .
    ValueMd was around since February 2003. A fellow called LS Wiltshire along with Azskeptic used it to bring IUHS and UHSA to its knees, but stupidly stopped posting against them in 2005 and they resurrected.

    uhsa tried to set up a meeting with azskeptic in the hop of injuring him in some way.I told him not to go.
    They sent a lawyer to my home in 2003 soon before I emigrated, and again they sent some one around Easter 2004…..God knows why, for I was not there.

    Since 2009 ValueMD has lost its influence. It is no longer a vibrant site, because you can not tell the truth. Once I got an infraction for quoting Paul (the apostle). If you speak the truth they remove you post and ban you temporarily or permanently.

    When you have a thread that has like 18,000 hits the school that you are telling the truth about will complain — they say thy dont get money from the schools but clearly the schools pay them They then complain and Value MD will lock the thread so that it cant be kept on the front page.

    LS Wiltshire along with Zee truth and Prausnitz killed SPSOM AND JBGDL BY JUST TELLING THE TRUTH ……….. just telling the truth

    Like

  42. Georgie Porgie May 27, 2016 at 8:54 PM #

    IF YOU GO TO THIS THREAD ON VALUE MD YOU WILL SE THAT BOTH PIECE AND I ARE CORRECT ABOUT WHY AUB WANT TO HIJACK LOCAL POLYCLINICS FOR THEIR PURPOSES

    http://www.valuemd.com/american-university-barbados-school-medicine-aub-clinicals/237964-current-aub-students-rotations.html

    wE ALL READY HAVE OUR NURSING STUDENTS AND UWI MEDICAL STUDENTS ROTATING IN OUR POLYCLINICS

    WHY MUST WE CONGEST AND POLUTE OUR POLYCLINICS WITH THESE PARASITES

    Like

  43. Georgie Porgie May 27, 2016 at 8:55 PM #

    PERHAPS SOME BU FOLK COULD REGISTER ON VMD AND GENTLY POST THEE SENTIMENTS THERE WITHOUT CALLING ANY NAMES

    Like

  44. Georgie Porgie May 27, 2016 at 9:55 PM #

    SENATOR WALCOTT: CLARITY NEEDED ON ACCREDITATION OF MEDICAL SCHOOLS IN THE REGION
    Fri, 05/27/2016 – 12:00am Barbados1
    OPPOSITION Senator Dr. Jerome Walcott says there still needs to be clarity about the accreditation of medical facilities operating in the region. One of them he says, is the American University of Barbados (AUB).
    His comments came in the Honourable Senate on Wednesday, where he debate on the Caribbean Accreditation Authority (Education in Medicine and other Health Professions) (CAAM-HP) (Incorporation) Bill 2016.

    According to Dr. Walcott, “…In perusing the records of Caribbean Association of Medical Councils (CAMC), I noted that the AUB has not fulfilled the accreditation requirements. It applied, it submitted some information two years ago was asked to submit additional information and this has not yet been forthcoming.”

    “So as it stands today the American University of Barbados operating in Barbados has not been accredited by CAAM-HP in terms of Barbadian students attending. It would obviously mean they would not be entitled to automatic registration to practice medicine in Barbados when they complete their studies at that institution. That will then be a matter for the CAMC and a series of exams which they will have to sit and pass to become eligible for registration in Barbados.”

    The former Minister of Health gave full support to the CAAM-HP to which Barbados has been a signatory since 2005 saying that the establishment of the authority will provide the assurance to the public, students, professionals that the Undergraduate programmes being offered in the region meet appropriate national and international standards.

    He explained that as it relates to the global registration of training facilities in medicine and other fields, the World Federation for Medication Education and the Foundation for the Advancement of International Medical Education and Research were established, to create standards and regularise training in medicine. “And the first Authority to be assessed by this new body was the CAAM-HP and they were very successful.”

    He explained that the policies and procedures are in accordance with internationally accepted best practice.

    Dr. Walcott stressed that the Accreditation Authority deals with standards for training while the CAMC deals with the registration of graduates to practice in member countries

    NOTE 1 AUB has not fulfilled the accreditation requirements of Caribbean Association of Medical Councils (CAMC)
    2 As it stands today the American University of Barbados operating in Barbados has not been accredited by CAAM-HP

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  45. Georgie Porgie May 27, 2016 at 10:20 PM #

    CAAM-C is, the body that is the legally constituted body established in 2003 under the aegis of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM), empowered to determine and prescribe standards and to accredit programmes of medical, dental, veterinary and other health professions education on behalf of the contracting parties in CARICOM.

    Since you have to meet certain minimum standards in order for your degree to be worth anything…it was to address this that CAAM-HP was established.”

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  46. Georgie Porgie May 27, 2016 at 10:30 PM #

    ROLE OF CAM C

    http://www.caam-hp.org/documents/conference/9_Registration-Licensing…The%20Role%20of%20CAMC_Spencer,%20Howard.pdf

    jUST CANT FIND THE SITE WHERE THEY LIST THE SCHOOLS THAT THEY ACCREDIT
    NOTE THAT VERY FEW MEDICAL SCHOOLS IN THE AREA ARE ACCREDITED– AUB IS NOT ONE

    Like

  47. Georgie Porgie May 27, 2016 at 10:38 PM #

    CAAM C WEBSITE
    http://www.caam-hp.org/

    Note the schools accredited by CAAM C
    http://www.caam-hp.org/assessedprogrammes.html

    Like

  48. Colonel Buggy May 28, 2016 at 10:33 PM #

    Georgie Porgie May 27, 2016 at 2:22 PM #

    Barbadians must be vigilant and ensure that they do not use our clinical facilities for their purposes or our people as guinea pigs for the school.
    …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….
    Beware of Greeks,or Brits or Yanks , bearing gifts.Well remembered an incident during an operation,when a new drug was used on men in my Company. The only two persons who were not affected by the outcome of this drug, were the only two persons who had opted not to take it. The Medical Officer (MO) and the RAMC Medic.

    Like

  49. Due Diligence June 20, 2016 at 2:30 PM #

    Here we go again.

    http://www.barbadostoday.bb/2016/06/19/offshore-solution-for-medical-internship/

    Boyce is talking – is Donville behind this recruitment of new offshore business?

    Like

  50. Georgie Porgie June 20, 2016 at 2:41 PM #

    DD
    WE HAVE LOOKED AT THIS ON MEDICAL CORNER

    Like

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