Caswell Franklyn, Head of Unity Workers Union

The Caswell Franklyn Column – Stop the Bullying and Talk

CXC

CXC

ALL THESE YEARS I have been labouring under the belief that slavery had been abolished in Barbados. Now I am not so sure, if I am to be guided by the legal opinion from the Solicitor General’s Office, which is reported to have said that marking School-Based Assessments (SBAs) forms part of the duties of a teacher.

During slavery, the master could and did lend out his slaves to work at other properties. Those slaves did so without pay and without the right to say no. I might be accused of being simplistic, but to my mind the legal opinion is saying that teachers can be hired by the Public Service Commission, and lent out to the Caribbean Examination Council (CXC), in circumstances where teachers do not have the right to say no and without pay to boot.

Teachers are appointed in accordance with Section 94 of the Constitution. Their terms and conditions of service can be found scattered among: the Education Act and its regulations; the Public Service Act; the General Orders for the Public Service; and the Public Service Regulations. Unless I have missed something, there is nothing in any of those documents that allows the Government to lend out teachers, without their consent, to CXC or anyone else.

The Barbados Secondary Teachers Union argues that marking SBAs is not part of the duties of a teacher, while the Ministry of Education is insisting that the teachers have been marking the SBAs all along, which constitute custom and practice and as a result, teachers are duty-bound to continue. In my view, the teachers have right on their side but they are not convincingly putting their case. On the other hand, the Ministry of Education, aided and abetted by the Solicitor General’s Chambers, is plainly wrong.

In accordance with their terms and conditions of service, teachers can be assigned to work at any Government school in Barbados, as we saw at the conclusion of the now infamous Alexandra School debacle of a few years ago. Further, they must perform any duty of a teacher as directed by their employer. But therein lies the problem, CXC is not a school in Barbados. It is an independent entity whose duty includes setting examinations and awarding certification based on those examinations.

It goes without saying that CXC must be responsible for marking those exams so that it can award its certification. SBAs are part of the examinations, and that being the case, it must mark its examination papers or put arrangements in place to do so. That is what the Barbados Secondary Teachers Union seems to be saying.

The Ministry of Education’s reliance on custom and practice simply does not make sense for one main reason. It can only reasonably insist if the duty of marking exams was a function of the ministry or one of the organisations under its control. CXC is not part of the teaching service; its functions therefore cannot form part of the duties of teachers in the Public Service of Barbados. It is an independent employer who has been getting away with not paying workers who perform tasks on its behalf for years.

On the other hand, the only saving grace for the Ministry of Education could be that it cannot allow CXC to pay teachers since none of them have ever gotten permission from the Service Commission to undertake other paid employment, as required by paragraph 19 of the Code of Conduct and Ethics. I must admit that it sounds farcical but, as far as I am aware, that is the only basis for refusing to pay teachers for their hard work.

My advice, even though unsolicited, would be that the Ministry of Education should stop being a bully and negotiate with the union; the BSTU should stick to its guns, mind you, I am only referring to this matter; and the Solicitor General’s Chambers need a refresher course in labour law.

Tell them slavery done.

Caswell Franklyn is the General Secretary of Unity Workers Union and a social commentator. Email: caswellf@hotmail.com

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47 Comments on “The Caswell Franklyn Column – Stop the Bullying and Talk”

  1. David May 1, 2016 at 7:38 AM #

    A BU blog posted in November 16 remains relevant today.

    Open Letter to Minister Ronald Jones On behalf of Teachers and Parents

    by David on November 8, 2015 in Barbados News Edit

    A wholesome society must be built on a strong foundation made up first and foremost of a quality family unit, other attributes like a functioning law […]

    2 CommentsContinue Reading →

    Like

  2. Bush Tea May 1, 2016 at 7:59 AM #

    Steupsss
    It is an inescapable fact of life.
    Whenever you do shiite, the smell will follow you around. Even if you flush it, something will come back to you later …perhaps in your water…

    CXC is shiite.
    Always has been, always will be…
    It is EXPENSIVE, unnecessary and counter-productive.

    It is inevitable that the smell will affect those in the periphery – like teachers, students, parents etc…..and we all will drink the contaminated water when it becomes clear that even local employers will give preference to INTERNATIONAL qualifications over local ones administered by persons whose objective seems to be to achieve as high rates of passes as possible RATHER than to establish as high a QUALITY of graduate as possible.

    ..and if CXC is shiite, then their SBAs are REAL pup…
    This is a scheme designed to ensure that clueless, useless, students ….who did no work, made no effort and has no future, gets a good shot at ‘passing the subject’ by being ‘gifted’ up to 40% of the marks needed.

    Surely that will enhance the quality of our national manpower resources….
    Bowls!!

    Like

  3. Well Well & Consequences May 1, 2016 at 8:23 AM #

    I gotta side with the teachers in this one…since CXC is a separate entity setting exams, and a Cariibean entity to boot, why dont they hire retired teachers from around the Cariibean, who are well versed in curriculum orfall types, to grade the papers.

    Problem solved….or would they also try to turn that too, into chaos and confusion.

    Why do they alway have to turn simple, solvable issues, into indeterminate chaos.

    Like

  4. Jeff Cumberbatch May 1, 2016 at 8:27 AM #

    @Caswell, “Custom and practice” is always the last recourse of an employer who wants to get its way. But not every custom and practice becomes a contractual term…Dicta from our Court of Appeal in a case where an employer tried it on to justify a suspension without pay-

    “In this appeal there is no evidence as to the practice in the vehicle rental trade in respect of suspensions without pay. There is no evidence of a custom that is reasonable, certain and notorious. This is not a case like Marshall v. The English Electric Co., Ltd [1945] 1 All E.R. 653where an established practice of using suspension as a disciplinary measure was held to be incorporated in the contract of employment.

    Like

  5. Observing May 1, 2016 at 9:00 AM #

    @Caswell
    your initial premise re. the purpose, philosophy and practical execution of SBA’s is incorrect, thus your conclusion (the BSTU is right) is faulty. As currently structured it is the duty of teachers to both carry out duties assigned (by the Principal) and follow the official schemes of work for the school inclusive of instruction and assessment….

    @Bushie
    indeed, they have become (generally) a farce that are not done or seen in accordance with the original intent, hence the mass of confusion. But hey, teachers and/or Principals are to blame for that.

    @David
    we really should revisit those final recommendations of the (expensive) Waterman Commission of Inquiry. Have any been enacted as yet? What about the long mooted Teacher Service Commission?
    We seem never willing to do what’s “best” for education.

    Imho, as per usual the BSTU is fighting the right battle the wrong way aimed at a regional entity without any regional support.

    The BUT is fighting the wrong battle the wrong way with clearly the wrong man leading the charge.

    Just observing.

    Like

  6. Jeff Cumberbatch May 1, 2016 at 9:09 AM #

    Observing, are you suggesting that the teacher must perform ANY task that the Principal may order, once it is something that the teacher can do? What are “the official schemes of work for the school…” Is carrying out assessment duties for another entity one of these?

    Like

  7. Observing May 1, 2016 at 9:41 AM #

    @Jeff
    Not any task. Reasonableness and relevance to the operations of the school must be the order of the day.

    the official schemes should come from the official curriculum which should come from the national curriculum etc. etc. If the MOE and schools determine that CSEC is the “official” syllabus to be used at what ever level(s) they so determine then this syllabus becomes the basis for the official scheme inclusive of any assessments.

    Your final question brings us to the crux of the matter.

    Are teachers carrying out assessment duties for CXC or are they doing it on behalf of the Ministry of Education (the local registrar) or for their respective schools (and principals)?

    Just observing

    Like

  8. David May 1, 2016 at 9:41 AM #

    @Observing

    Good to see you weighing in on the important issue of education.Who is the man leading the charge by the way?

    Here is a file listing the Waterman recommendations extracted from the 110 page Waterman 600k report.

    https://barbadosunderground.files.wordpress.com/2016/05/watermanrecmmendations.pdf

    Here is a link to the full report.

    https://barbadosunderground.files.wordpress.com/2012/12/waterman_coi.pdf

    Like

  9. Observing May 1, 2016 at 10:09 AM #

    @David
    The circus we have descended to over the past 2 or so weeks was too much to bear. There is only so much one can observe in silence.

    re. Waterman report, recommendations 2, 3 and 6 were always of peculiar interest from day one.

    re. who should be leading education? There’s the minister, the Chief, Deputy Chiefs responsible for schools, Principals of Secondary Schools, Boards of Managements, education officers along with trade unions who are supposed to be “responsible”.

    imho it requires effective leadership at ALL levels within a clear policy driven environment and a sound national philosophy of education.

    As you said somewhere else. the principal actors may have their own individual agendas which may not necessarily be rooted in the critical goal of student achievement.

    Just observing

    Like

  10. Jeff Cumberbatch May 1, 2016 at 10:09 AM #

    Observing@ 9:41am, agree that that is the critical issue! Note, however, that the object of the assessment -certification- is not limited or restricted to the particular school that assessed the SBA…

    Like

  11. Caswell Franklyn May 1, 2016 at 10:19 AM #

    Observing

    Why don’t you just take the time out to think before you write. You would not post such nonsense if you were writing under your own name.

    Like

  12. David May 1, 2016 at 10:23 AM #

    @Caswell

    What do you disagree with Observing?

    Like

  13. Observing May 1, 2016 at 11:16 AM #

    @jeff
    Agreed. It really is a regional issue which makes it interesting that there is no regional support for the BSTU position. It’s also an industrial issue that speaks to employer-employee relationships at various levels.

    The BSTU’s basic argument of “pay us or else” oversimplifies the matter.

    The MOE’s argument that it’s the teachers’ duty doesn’t remove the “unreasonableness” and burden that may occur even if it is their duty legally.

    @Caswell
    Thanks. As you’ve said many times, when they lash out at you, you can be assured you are on the right track.

    Just observing

    Like

  14. David May 1, 2016 at 11:17 AM #

    An Obituary printed in the London Times…..Absolutely Dead Brilliant!!

    By Tom on November 24, 2015 in News from Panama

    TheTimes.26691232_std

    This was sent in to me by one of my readers.

    Today we mourn the passing of a beloved old friend, Common Sense, who has been with us for many years. No one knows for sure how old he was, since his birth records were long ago lost in bureaucratic red tape. He will be remembered as having cultivated such valuable lessons as:

    – Knowing when to come in out of the rain;

    – Why the early bird gets the worm;

    – Life isn’t always fair;

    – And maybe it was my fault.

    Common Sense lived by simple, sound financial policies (don’t spend more than you can earn) and reliable strategies (adults, not children, are in charge).

    His health began to deteriorate rapidly when well-intentioned but overbearing regulations were set in place. Reports of a 6-year-old boy charged with sexual harassment for kissing a classmate; teens suspended from school for using mouthwash after lunch; and a teacher fired for reprimanding an unruly student, only worsened his condition.

    Common Sense lost ground when parents attacked teachers for doing the job that they themselves had failed to do in disciplining their unruly children.

    It declined even further when schools were required to get parental consent to administer sun lotion or an aspirin to a student; but could not inform parents when a student became pregnant and wanted to have an abortion.

    Common Sense lost the will to live as the churches became businesses; and criminals received better treatment than their victims.

    Common Sense took a beating when you couldn’t defend yourself from a burglar in your own home and the burglar could sue you for assault.

    Common Sense finally gave up the will to live, after a woman failed to realize that a steaming cup of coffee was hot. She spilled a little in her lap, and was promptly awarded a huge settlement.

    Common Sense was preceded in death,

    -by his parents, Truth and Trust,

    -by his wife, Discretion,

    -by his daughter, Responsibility,

    -and by his son, Reason.

    He is survived by his 5 stepbrothers;

    – I Know My Rights

    – I Want It Now

    – Someone Else Is To Blame

    – I’m A Victim

    – Pay me for Doing Nothing

    Not many attended his funeral because so few realized he was gone.

    If you still remember him, pass this on. If not, join the majority and do nothing.

    Amen!

    Thomas H. Brymer II

    We invite you to visit our country and learn if Panama Real Estate is right for you.

    – See more at: http://panamaadvisoryinternationalgroup.com/blog/news-from-panama/an-obituary-printed-in-the-london-times-absolutely-dead-brilliant/#sthash.ZhzadV6E.dpuf

    Like

  15. Bush Tea May 1, 2016 at 11:27 AM #

    Absolutely brilliant!
    …and brutally true.
    Brass bowlery rules.

    Like

  16. David May 1, 2016 at 3:17 PM #

    This is part of the problem we need to focus on. The media has not circled back to investigate the status of the Waterman recommendations, the unions (BSTU) have lurched from one issue to the next. It explains why nothing changes.

    Like

  17. Observing May 1, 2016 at 4:01 PM #

    @David 3:17
    Exactly.
    And there some of us who “like um so.”

    btw, the leader I referred to at 9:00 am is Mr. P. Shepherd. Rejected prospective DLP candidate for St. Michael South East.

    just observing.

    Like

  18. David May 1, 2016 at 4:06 PM #

    There is a lot of politics being played from the most unlikely of places.

    Just Observing (as well)

    Like

  19. ac May 1, 2016 at 4:29 PM #

    In all of this back and forth why hasn’t anyone brought to table for discussion the CXC Agreements signed and accepted by the 16 regional govts. that might be the first place to visit to get a clearer perspective on what is due and to who and if there are any clauses which prohibits a pay scale/or compensation to regional teachers for correction of the examination papers

    Like

  20. de pedantic Dribbler May 1, 2016 at 5:49 PM #

    @MrBlogmaster, I was awaiting the response to your query: “@Caswell, What do you disagree with Observing?”

    Mr Franklyn can be very cryptic even as he is wonderfully informative and I though your query was reasonable as a further clarification. His points were very well made but in turn @Observer offered an interesting counter point.

    But as you said subsequently maybe there is too much politics in all these matters so its difficult to move purposefully through substantive rules and regulations.

    Like

  21. David May 1, 2016 at 5:53 PM #

    Note with interest the reblogged Open Letter to Minister Jones is bouncing around FB. It says how reactive we are as a people.

    https://barbadosunderground.wordpress.com/2015/11/08/open-letter-to-minister-ronald-jones-on-behalf-of-teachers-and-parents/

    Like

  22. ac May 1, 2016 at 6:56 PM #

    in this article it speaks to some of the teachers challenges as described by the union and resolutions
    also note worthy in the presentation is CUT attempt to bringing the issue of compensation on behalf of the teachers to the CXC

    https://www.cxc.org/SiteAssets/ConferencePapers/TheChallengeofManagingPublicExaminationsSGiles.pdf

    Like

  23. Caswell Franklyn May 1, 2016 at 7:45 PM #

    Observing wrote:

    @Caswell
    your initial premise re. the purpose, philosophy and practical execution of SBA’s is incorrect, thus your conclusion (the BSTU is right) is faulty. As currently structured it is the duty of teachers to both carry out duties assigned (by the Principal) and follow the official schemes of work for the school inclusive of instruction and assessment…

    It sounds good but it does not make sense. Suppose the principal assigned the duty of picking up paper. According to his argument the duty would have been assigned by the principal so the teacher must obey. Of course the teacher would be entitled to say that it was not his/her job and refuse to comply.

    The assessment that Observing is refer would be internal assessment for promotion. It could not possibly have been assessment for CXC simply because assessment for external exams would not have been in the contemplation of the people who drafted the duties of a teacher because CXC did not exist back then.

    External assessment is the duty of the CXC. Teachers are not employed by CXC and they are not jobbing slaves owned by Ministry of Education.

    Like

  24. Observing May 1, 2016 at 9:09 PM #

    @caswell
    No Principal can force any teacher to (must) pick up paper. Please see my response to Jeff’s question on that matter re reasonableness and relevance to school operations.

    Next, the school based assessment was always intended to be marks collected from normal school based exercises/assignments given in concert with the syllabus, but, standardised to ensure regional validity and eventually moderated to ensure such. I.e., regular school work given and assessed by extraordinary teachers during their regular duties which then gets credit at exam grading time to students’ benefit. As I said to Bushie, it has erroneously evolved into an excessive exercise. A read of ac’s submission by Dr.Giles reinforces this intent.

    Lastly, obfuscation when ignorance or doubt are highlighted is not a good defence. Nothing’s wrong with not knowing everything. It’s called being human.

    Just observing

    I leave you to wallow.

    Like

  25. Caswell Franklyn May 1, 2016 at 9:25 PM #

    Observing

    Have you ever seen an SBA or the process for completing one. It is not normal or regular school work as you suggest. I have assisted many students. In some cases, students have to go into the field to collect data to complete their assignments. That is how I came into contact with them as a resource person.

    The intent that you touted was done after the SBAs were conceptualised and not the other way around. It is really an after-the-fact justification. You really should not quote AC for learned anything.

    Sent from my iPad

    >

    Like

  26. Simple Simon May 1, 2016 at 9:37 PM #

    Dear Caswell: I read you column in today’s Sunday Sun. Straight and to the point. I agree with you completely.

    Like

  27. Simple Simon May 1, 2016 at 9:49 PM #

    @Bush Tea May 1, 2016 at 7:59 AM “CXC is shiite etc…local employers will give preference to INTERNATIONAL qualifications.”

    Dear Bush Tea:

    Your statement is utter nonsense. CXC actually creates and runs very good examinations which are highly regarded by local, regional and foreign universities as meeting the entry requirements for university education. And when I speak of foreign universities I include those universities which in the U.S are called Ivy League and in the U.K Oxbridge, etc.

    CXC is not intended as a substitute for an excellent UNIVERSITY education, but rather as a PREPARATION for a university education

    And you speak of employers preferring international qualifications. Now tell me how many parents in the Caribbean can afford to send their children to international schools for their secondary school education?

    You are being a silly antique f@rt.

    Excuse me David.

    Like

  28. Simple Simon May 1, 2016 at 9:57 PM #

    @Jeff Cumberbatch May 1, 2016 at 9:09 AM “Observing, are you suggesting that the teacher must perform ANY task that the Principal may order…Is carrying out assessment duties for another entity one of these?”

    You are being for too gentlemanly with Observing…back in the day he would have been one of those people who would say slavery is legal so we can’t do neffen ’bout it.

    Like

  29. Simple Simon May 1, 2016 at 9:59 PM #

    Dear Lord:

    If I ever commit a criminal offence let me be tried by judge only…because Dear Lord my “peers” are so stupid.

    Like

  30. Simple Simon May 1, 2016 at 10:04 PM #

    @Caswell Franklyn May 1, 2016 at 10:19 AM “Why don’t you just take the time out to think before you write. You would not post such nonsense if you were writing under your own name.”

    Very likely in his official capacity Observing DID plenty of unreasonable things.

    And that is the trouble.

    Like

  31. Simple Simon May 1, 2016 at 10:07 PM #

    @Observing May 1, 2016 at 11:16 AM “Agreed. It really is a regional issue which makes it interesting that there is no regional support for the BSTU position.”

    Has it occurred to you that the Barbados teachers are leading the way on this issue, and that if successful the teachers in the region will get on board?

    Somebody has to lead.

    So why not the Barbados teachers?

    Like

  32. ac May 1, 2016 at 10:15 PM #

    The ignorance of the likes of a Caswell is synonymous to that of borderline madness no wonder that there is so much mayhem and confusion in this 2×4 island An article which i sourced as a matter of reference or enlightenment becomes ridicule by the ugliest agitator of law one Caswell.. political interference has no bounds when stupidity takes precedent
    What an a.ss clown , Instead of the a.. hole abandoning his so called legal gymnastic on the issue he proves himself to be a bigger jack a,ss but opting to attack the source of the article

    Like

  33. Simple Simon May 1, 2016 at 10:16 PM #

    @Caswell Franklyn May 1, 2016 at 9:25 PM “Observing, you really should not quote AC for learned anything.”

    True.

    Lolll!!!

    Wunna killing me den.

    Like

  34. ac May 1, 2016 at 10:25 PM #

    FYI information observing was not quoting me ,He was quoting an article which gives not a political view like the stupid article that Caswell has posted but an enlightened presentation of many of the questions being forwarded by the teachers Union

    Like

  35. Observing May 1, 2016 at 10:37 PM #

    @Caswell & Simple

    I referenced Dr. Giles, not ac.

    @Caswell
    “It is not normal or regular school work as you suggest”

    We agree, but that doesn’t change the fact that it’s supposed to be. Therefore the “issue” isn’t “the SBA” but the administration of “the SBA” which places responsibility somewhere else other than only CXC.

    Also, there have been some sweeping changes to the guidelines and procedures for SBAs intended to simplify the process for schools and teachers. Any discussion on this topic along with the history and evolution of them should take these into consideration.

    I’ll say again as I said this same time last year. The BSTU has a case, but they are arguing the wrong case and initially in the wrong place and definitely in the wrong way.

    @Simple Simon
    by name and in this case by nature. Have you found out whether plums grow on thistles?

    Just observing

    Like

  36. ac May 1, 2016 at 10:48 PM #

    here an interesting point that the Unions need to pay special attentio

    The CXC will introduce electronic marking (e-marking) in the very near future. Three emarking
    pilots have been completed and further research is being undertaken. This is necessary because the cost of centrally marking over a million scripts and the provision of air transport and hotel accommodation for 2000 teachers in four territories is unsustainable.

    while the Unions marched towards asking for compensation the CXC is already in the planning stages of seeking alternative solutions to marking This should be of interest to the legal ack ass Cawell in his advice to the Union as he guides them into deeper doo across a political mine field

    Like

  37. ac May 1, 2016 at 10:59 PM #

    The issues pertaining to markings work overload and markings has been addressed by the CXC and the CUT however the Unions must know by now that the calls for compensation also must also be regionally address by all govts signed to the Agreeements and where law is involved most likely it would also have to be debated in parliament
    Caswell is a big mouth mcguffy no wonder he has only managed to attract fifty or so members to his Union

    Like

  38. Donna May 1, 2016 at 11:23 PM #

    This issue does not appear to be clear cut. It can only be resolved if both parties decide to cut out the posturing and examine the issues dispassionately. Other than that I think it is a matter for the courts.

    Like

  39. Simple Simon May 2, 2016 at 12:03 AM #

    @Observing May 1, 2016 at 10:37 PM “Simple Simon by name and in this case by nature. Have you found out whether plums grow on thistles?”

    I know more about growing food than you will in this world or the next.

    Still don’t want you serving on my jury.

    Like

  40. Retribution-things that make me go hum! May 2, 2016 at 12:02 PM #

    Both sides have valid points on this issue, therefore am neither for or against; however, the BSTU/ Unions continues to approach issues in the wrong manner (The DLP way of handling matters) and hence the reason why there seems to be chaos in every circumstance.

    Like

  41. millertheanunnaki May 2, 2016 at 12:50 PM #

    @ Observing May 1, 2016 at 9:09 PM #
    “No Principal can force any teacher to (must) pick up paper. Please see my response to Jeff’s question on that matter re reasonableness and relevance to school operations.”

    Why not?
    Suppose the Principal saw the teacher actually drop the paper (litter)?

    Your support for the teacher and the Principal at the Springer Memorial for insisting one of their charges pick up a ‘stray’ sweetie wrapper seems rather at odds with your position regarding that of the SBA fiasco.

    Why not argue that the duties of Secondary School teacher need to be renegotiated to reflect current realities and possible future adjustments because of technological (ICT) influences?

    Like

  42. ac May 2, 2016 at 12:53 PM #

    Where is big mout Caswell.He still operates with the mindset that Barbados lives in a fish bowl . His constant reminders of barbados law shows his inability to grasp and understand that outside our laws there are international all well as Caricom laws that are by products and are active and necessary to forming solutions
    Hence barbados had to learn the hard way in the myrie issue
    His grand prentense of his knoweldge to law can be at times misleading to those who have eyes but fail to use them

    Like

  43. Observing May 2, 2016 at 3:19 PM #

    @miller
    “Suppose the Principal saw the teacher actually drop the paper ”

    Then reasonableness would apply.

    “Your support for the teacher and the Principal at the Springer Memorial….”

    I purposely chose not to comment on that issue. You may be confusing me with my distant cousin twice removed “Observer.”

    “Why not argue that the duties of Secondary School teacher need to be renegotiated…”

    Indeed they need to be, along with the entire Education Act and Regulations.

    Just observing.

    Like

  44. Bush Tea May 2, 2016 at 4:29 PM #

    One thing at least ..should be obvious..
    If the damn teachers and Education officials cannot resolve a single issue without cussing, fighting and brawling, …then no one should expect the school children to be any better.
    Obviously there is no person of any influence in the teaching business who have the skills to resolve conflict …and certainly not to teach children how to do so….
    Observing’s last point about the need to revamp the whole shiite is therefore obvious.

    Question is …. who is capable of such a re-engineering job?
    ..Mop-Top? … waaahhhh ha ha ha whaloss!!!
    ..We Jonesing? …. ha ha ha LOL … rotflmbao
    ..Froon? …ah..crying…..!!!

    Our ass is grass!!
    It seems that BBE will have to re-engineer the whole shiite…..

    Like

  45. Well Well & Consequences May 2, 2016 at 5:01 PM #

    AC….and why did Barbados government have to learn the hard way with the Myrie matter when there are at least 30 lawyers sitting in parliament, why did they put 2 empty headed jackasses like Harry Husbands and Maxine McClean up front to make an already bad situation worse by telling lies on Myrie…when there are at least 30 lawyers sitting their asses in parliament at the taxpayer’s expense..

    What do these lawyers do for their salaries.

    Is that how they solve local and regional conflicts…just sit on their asses collecting a salary every month.

    Like

  46. Victor May 3, 2016 at 1:16 PM #

    oh you dear little things haven’t you anything better to think about?

    Like

  47. David May 3, 2016 at 7:57 PM #

    Motion filed | Barbados Today

    Like

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