Jeff_Cumberbatch

The Jeff Cumberbatch Column – The Mirage of Integration (I)

carlos_brathwaiteIf uh wasn’t there to see fuh meself,

I would’a never believe it,

I would’a never believe it.

But I say it once an’ I say it agen:

When things goin’ good, you cahn touch

We; but leh murder start an’ you can fine a man to hole up de side…”

-Kamau Brathwaite –“Rites” (Islands: The Arrivants)

Two events in the past few weeks, totally disconnected otherwise, have served to explain, in rather cogent fashion, the stuttering hold-and-nudge approach that we appear to have adopted with regard to the now decades-old regional integration project. It bears reminder of the doubtful lover with the oxeye daisy as he or she plucks the alternate petals: “He/she loves me; he/she loves me not…” or, more contextually put, “Integration; integration not; integration; integration not…”

The first and more recent was the astounding double triumph last Sunday of the regional men’s and women’s cricket teams in the International Cricket Council’s [ICC] dual World T20 competitions in India. Given our relative drought of victories thitherto, and combined with the recent success of our Under -19 players in their version of the World Cup, the resultant euphoria of the region was to be expected.

But this essay is not about the game itself that embodied a heady cocktail of umbrage at the accusation of the team being “short of brains”; the technical skill of the similarly named Samuel Badree and Marlon Samuels; and the awesome batsmanship of Carlos Brathwaite in his successful devastation of Ben Stokes’ final and necessarily incomplete over). So far as the first is concerned, the following should be required reading: –https://firmmeditation.wordpress.com/2016/04/07/could-you-be-loved/

Yet, amidst it all, there came to the fore that Sunday global revelation of the underlying cancer of antagonistic discord in the governance of the regional game. Flushed with the aftermath of a spectacular victory and confidently assured of the goodwill of most West Indian fans on such a bountiful occasion, the captain of the men’s team, Mr Darren Sammy, in plain sight and audience of the global cricket-loving public, used the happy occasion to air the very dirty linen that constitutes the industrial and administrative relation between the players, their representative organization, the West Indian Players’ Association [WIPA], and the West Indies Cricket Board [WICB].

Naturally, Mr ‘Dave’ Cameron, the current president of the WICB, took vocal exception to this and, immediately, the joy that should have been universally felt in the afterglow of all too rare moment of modern regional cricket supremacy, devolved into an shouting match between those commentators firmly opposed to the recent poor fortunes of the team, the form or style of governance by the current WICB or, simply, the personality of its president and those comparatively few that felt the need to defend the beleaguered organization owing to membership in it or through a natural inclination to support the underdog.

Understandably, Mr Sammy was joined in his generalized condemnation of the WICB by the voiced opinions of a number of past and current players; the iterations of some regional heads of government; and sundry commentators who, dissatisfied with our lowly positions in the longer forms of the game, taking up the “fire-rage” of the players and the politicians, or simply disgusted with president Cameron’s defiant and combative style, see no merit at all in the current Board.

Notably few, however, were the voices of reason at this time of acrimony, among them the former Prime Minister of Barbados, Mr Owen Arthur, who wisely counseled a moratorium in the controversy that, ironically, could fuel a destruction of regional cricket at a time when the region ought to be in its cups at the unprecedented victories.

This scenario calls to mind so much an elegantly written passage from the James Baldwin novel, “Tell me how long the train’s been gone”, quoted by Kamau Brathwaite in the work referred to in the epigraph:

“It was as though, after indescribable, nearly mortal effort, after grim years of fasting and prayer, after the loss of all he had, and after having been promised by the Almighty that he had paid the price and no more would be demanded of his soul, which was harboured now; it was as though in the midst of his joyful feasting and dancing, crowned and robed, a messenger arrived to tell him that a great error had been made, and that it was all to be done again”.

In fact, despite all the distaste that might be felt by many at his defiant and, some say, arrogant attitude, president Cameron is undeniably the constitutionally elected president of the WICB and calls for his involuntary removal or the dissolution of the current administration therefore arguably contradict the rule of law that should presumably govern regional affairs.

Ironically, with the charge for this form of resolution being led by a few regional Prime Ministers, it should provide a teachable moment for each of them. They, likewise, enjoy their current status by virtue of a constitutionally legitimate election and appointment and would rightly consider it treasonable anarchy if it were seriously to be suggested that any of them should have his administration voluntarily or forcibly dissolved immediately because of apparent popular dissatisfaction.

The effective solution, in my view, is not to set a roguish and scofflaw precedent of unconstitutionally removing an unpopular Board. It is for the “electorate” to do so according to the established rules; first, by each constituent body electing, to sit on the WICB, local representatives who are willing to commit to the constitutional reform of the present structure and thereby to popularize the governance of West Indies cricket. Or, as is our wont, are we prepared to talk about it only?

Any other measure smacks of the paramountcy of personality; an agenda that has proven so far to be to our detriment in politics, law, cricket and much else in the region besides.

To be continued…

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45 Comments on “The Jeff Cumberbatch Column – The Mirage of Integration (I)”

  1. Caswell Franklyn April 10, 2016 at 7:37 AM #

    These regional political leaders are mostly doing poor jobs at what they were elected to do. It is amazing that they want to put their reverse Midas touch on cricket as well.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Well Well & Consequences April 10, 2016 at 7:51 AM #

    Do any of these people…..politicians, professionals, etc ever take a look at how they are being seen by others, their inability to agree on, solve or enforce anything positive does not exist because they do not like agreeing with each other on anything. ..that is a social problem, being socialized to contradict everything and solve nothing…and passing on that anti-social behavior from one generation to the next.

    True idiots.

    Like

  3. David April 10, 2016 at 8:05 AM #

    @Caswell

    All cricket fans agree the WICB needs to change, what will force the change? The sub Committee of Caricom is attempting to use suasion to have them start the conversation, that is all.

    Like

  4. Caswell Franklyn April 10, 2016 at 8:17 AM #

    David

    Moral usually go along with suasion in instances like this, but you were careful not to. I wonder why.

    Sent from my iPad

    >

    Like

  5. David April 10, 2016 at 8:23 AM #

    @Caswell

    We cant have our cake and eat it too. The governments like the ordinary Joe Citizen is just another stakeholder in the process trying to wheel influence. Yes their stick is bigger than the average Joe but BU believes we need to support governments to bring the WICB to the table.

    Like

  6. David April 10, 2016 at 8:43 AM #

    History will be kind to me, I will be vindicated says Cameron
    — April 10, 2016
    Cameron

    Cameron

    Bridgetown, Barbados: President of the West Indies Cricket Board (WICB) Dave Cameron says he will never ever do anything to destroy West Indies’ cricket.

    In an interview with a newspaper in Barbados Cameron said there has been misleading information being fed to cricket fans across the region.

    “I am not here to destroy the game. We just won three World titles and the feeling is I want to mash it up. I can’t believe some of the criticism I am receiving. It is absurd. My heart is with the Caribbean 100 percent. I am a Caribbean man. I am for the good of West Indies cricket”, the embattled president said.

    Cameron said he extremely disappointed to hear that some people think that he is arrogant.

    “I am very straight forward. I am prepared to meet with anyone and discuss the way forward. I know what I am about. I have been the president of a cricket club in Jamaica for the last 16 years and a member for 32 years says Cameron.

    He defended the WICB decision not to give retainer contracts to some cricketers who rarely play firstclass cricket in the region.

    “Why should I pay you to play three or four first matches a year? What are you doing for the WICB outside of playing three or four T20s a year? we have to have some kind of consciousness about that about that”, says Cameron.

    According to Cameron it was unfortunate that some of his tweets on Twitter has been misrepresented.

    “I have had a lot of criticism about a tweet that has gone on my timeline. Go to my timeline and look. There are motivational tweets on my timeline every day. Why could someone not used that tweet to say I was saying to Darren Sammy and Marlon Samuels to do not let the critics get to you”, Cameron said.

    “I have also tweeted to Darren Sammy and Stafanie Taylor wishing them luck. History will be kind to me. I will be vindicated” Cameron added.

    Like

  7. Caswell Franklyn April 10, 2016 at 8:47 AM #

    David

    Governments have too many things to fix and they are failing. Let them concentrate on their core business and leave other alone. Most of them are incompetent to manage their business. What makes you think that they can fix cricket.

    >

    Like

  8. David April 10, 2016 at 8:48 AM #

    @Caswell

    When the respective cricket boards approach the governments with cap in hand should they shoo them away? Because this is what you are saying.

    On 10 April 2016 at 12:47, Barbados Underground wrote:

    >

    Like

  9. Jeff Cumberbatch April 10, 2016 at 8:55 AM #

    David, I agree with Caswell.

    What is the locus stand (legal standing) of regional administrations in attempting to change the personnel/structure of an autonomous organization that has broken no laws? Might this extend to unions, clubs, opposition parties?

    In other circumstances, this might justifiably be called “bullying”!

    Like

  10. Caswell Franklyn April 10, 2016 at 8:58 AM #

    David

    You seem to be missing my point, and that is: the government’s have more important things to do, go and do them and set an example for NGOs to follow. Their houses are burning and they are worrying about something else. They recorded in government would not suggest that they know how to fix anything.

    >

    Like

  11. Vincent Haynes April 10, 2016 at 8:58 AM #

    This article as Jeff headlined is about the mirage of integration,not knowing what his second example will be,I will however add the comments of Mr Antoine re CLICO&BAICO and the handling thereof by the govt. of Bim to the mix.

    What we are seeing today is the greatest divide ever between the english speaking Caribbean territories since their ancestors arrival from West Africa&Europe centuries ago.

    I keep asking whose purpose does it serve to ensure that this division remains and who will be the ruler in this Divide&Rule exercise….one thing which is sure,is that no long term benefit by the individual islands can be derived from this fractured relationship.

    Like

  12. David April 10, 2016 at 9:03 AM #

    @Jeff

    On the surface it has the smell of bullying BUT should we examine the structure of cricket in the Caribbean (WICB) first and who is support of last resort for the game when all the dust settles?

    On 10 April 2016 at 12:55, Barbados Underground wrote:

    >

    Like

  13. Bush Tea April 10, 2016 at 9:23 AM #

    If you start wrong, there can only be one outcome…

    THERE IS NO SUCH ENTITY AS ‘THE WEST INDIES’.
    It is therefore a lotta shiite to expect any kind of harmonious unity just because the English lumped us all together 80 years ago with the intention of trashing our collective asses in cricket in order to reinforce their misguided concepts of superiority.

    Once we has trashed their donkeys (as Worrell’s squad did), we should have disbanded the nonsense – OR TRULY ESTABLISHED AN ENTITY CALLED WI.

    It is amazing how we expect to continue to do shiite …and realize nice smelling results…

    Like

  14. David April 10, 2016 at 9:24 AM #

    Here is a BC Pires column to muddy the issue.

    http://wired868.com/2016/04/08/the-agony-of-the-feat-bc-pires-sees-the-beginning-and-the-end-of-the-wicb/

    Like

  15. TheGazer April 10, 2016 at 9:41 AM #

    Excellent article.
    The link that you embedded was also excellent and you completed the trifecta with the video that was embedded in the link. I thought this type of thinking about black athletes was ‘unique’ to the US, but it seems to have taken root in other countries and in non-US sports.

    I had chosen the side of Darren Sammy, for I felt there is a need for the youth to speak out and highlight what they feel is wrong with the current situation. For too long, have we adopted the belief that because people were elected/appointed/selected to a post then their every action is correct.

    We have to hold these appointees to a higher standard; measure their success by the quality of their results; qualifications for a position must supersede friendship or political connections. So I was in agreement with what I saw as Mr Sammy’s attempt to hold the board’s feet to the fire.

    Dave follow-up with the comment from Mr Cameron made me see things in a different light. It would be interesting to see how others feel about the “Sammy vs. Cameron battle”.

    Like

  16. Vincent Haynes April 10, 2016 at 9:44 AM #

    David April 10, 2016 at 9:24 AM #

    As usual BC is on point……It was a sorry day that his articles were removed from the reading material of Bajans.

    BT
    Could not agree with you more re the “no such entity as the the west indies” ,because we are Caribbean people who are yet to construct ourselves around this reality.
    I keep asking you,as to who you are serving by keeping Bims future constrained?

    Like

  17. TheGazer April 10, 2016 at 1:27 PM #

    @VH
    As usual BC is on point….?

    “West Indies are champions of the shallowest, but most spectacular, version of the game of cricket.

    And they are at the bottom of its deepest and most beautiful form, which is the Test match that measures life itself …”

    Isn’t that a repeat of the brainless statement. The WI have great hitters but when it come to the cerebral game of cricket “the Test match”.

    A rose by any other name is just a rose…

    I was letting it past, but decided to seek the help of BU in understanding those paragraphs.

    Like

  18. David April 10, 2016 at 1:36 PM #

    @TheGazer

    You are wrong, the popularity of the game – money and fan base – has evolved to the shorter form and as luck would have it WI is well positioned to benefit, our best20/20 players ply their skills across the world and therefore the WICB and people of the Caribbean benefit from it. The great irony is that the WICB has penalized the prominent players in the Twenty20 team because they are never available to play in domestic competitions yet the high we are on today after winning the ICC World 20/20 men is because of it.

    The CPL in the Caribbean this summer will be bigger than ever because of the WI recent success. It is all about recognizing the shift and taking advantage of it. Never again will crowds flock to stadia to watch 5 days of Test cricket on a consistent basis.

    Like

  19. Sargeant April 10, 2016 at 1:52 PM #

    1 from 10 leaves nought.

    Cricket and Integration have been dissected morning, noon and night by the English Speaking Caribbean and we are no further along….

    I found the link that Jeff provided very compelling and in synch with much of the thinking that has prevalent in some major US Sports e.g. Football and Baseball. If Cricket was incubated and nurtured on the playing fields of Eton, then those dark skinned players from the colonies could only be regarded as interlopers and upstarts. Cricket was a game of “Gentlemen” and “Players” and the Oxford educated Cowdrey was much the intellectual while the coal miner’s son Trueman was an outsider as reflected in the English “caste” system. These attitudes transcend borders and are subtler in their application such as references to the “calypso” and “dancing” cricketers, but the Haiku as practiced by the Maori’s in Rugby is considered cultural and is never treated by the Press as a sideshow and that could be because their white team mates have been coopted into the celebratory or intimidation aspect of the performance.

    However, Sport is a microcosm of society and Jackie Robinson integrated America’s pastime in 1947 but the reaction of some segments of society has changed only in the language being used to describe the intellectual prowess of some participants in sport such as the views expressed on National TV by “Jimmy the Greek” or by the former Dodger executive Al Campanis that Blacks lack the intellectual capacity to manage certain segments of the game e.g. Quarterback in football. Then there is the element expressed by others that some people don’t play the game the “right way” as in the reaction of some in the national media to Jose Batista’s bat flip https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-UdsVO7HaJg

    (who is considered Latino) home run in last year’s baseball playoff, or the dress code imposed on travelling NBA players after the then NBA commissioner didn’t appreciate Allan Iverson’s wardrobe because it might alienate the white patrons who pay money to attend games or comprise the majority TV audience of those games. What is truly remarkable is that that fans in some cities e.g. St. Louis could compartmentalise the black players representing their e.g. the Rams and Cardinals and see them differently from the residents of Ferguson unless they lose their anonymity on the streets as in the former baseball player who was assaulted at a gas station by a St. Louis cardinal fan….

    There is still a long way to go.

    Like

  20. TheGazer April 10, 2016 at 2:02 PM #

    Sargeant.
    Excellent and short.
    Stand at ease.

    Like

  21. TheGazer April 10, 2016 at 2:05 PM #

    @David
    By wrong, you are saying that BCs statement is not a fancy “restatement of short on brains”. I thought it was.

    Like

  22. TheGazer April 10, 2016 at 2:08 PM #

    BC
    “West Indies are champions of the shallowest, but most spectacular, version of the game of cricket.

    And they are at the bottom of its deepest and most beautiful form, which is the Test match that measures life itself ……..…”

    Like

  23. David April 10, 2016 at 2:09 PM #

    “West Indies are champions of the shallowest, but most spectacular, version of the game of cricket.”

    The establishment have not fully accepted Twenty20 as the form of the game that is the future, but they will. What they abhor is that it is a version suited to our skills. Ask the fans.

    Like

  24. de pedantic Dribbler April 10, 2016 at 3:23 PM #

    @Gazer, obviously there are no excuses to be made for Nicholas “short on brains” remark. From a reading of his piece its clear that he made a very off-hand, inappropriate and offensive comment as part of very brief comments on the WI in what was a comparatively lengthy article. He rightly apologized profusely for his inept, nonsensical remarks.

    That being said don’t let us get hog-tied by the comment “West Indies are champions of the shallowest, but most spectacular, version of the game of cricket.” That is a fact. T20 is currently the shallowest form of cricket as ODIs were in 1975 and 79 when we were champions then too,

    But we did not become champions in either format by being ‘short of brains’… au contraire so no problem!

    Now surely we all recall that we went to Australia in ’75-76 and were spanked very soundly…and were briefly “… at the bottom of its deepest and most beautiful form”.

    So currently and unfortunately that is also a fact of life but in this case we have been in that state of flux for several years now. And doubly most unfortunately that state of affairs is undoubtedly due to a display of “short on brains” led by the executives of the WIBC.

    We just don’t appreciate an Englishman – particularly one who is very good buddies with a number of WI players of the past and knows us only too well – getting into our kitchen like that… and doing it so ineptly! That man can write very well so he really can’t be excused for those lazy words..fah real.

    So no need to run from Nicholas’s word. He was out of place…but in WI cricket we can man-up and admit that clarity of thinking has definitely been in short supply in recent years!

    Like

  25. de pedantic Dribbler April 10, 2016 at 3:33 PM #

    @David at 2:09 … re “What they abhor is that it is a version suited to our skills”—- In a perfect dream-scape sequence , the Bollywood and other Indian magnates would have started T20 cricket back in the 80’s.

    Talk about ‘suited to our skills’. I challenge any thinking that offers any team that would have knocked us off a championship pedestal…oh lawd!

    In fact I suspect that the cries for breaking up WI cricket into its composite parts would definitely have reached crescendo. LOLL

    Like

  26. Exclaimer April 10, 2016 at 5:58 PM #

    @ Jeff,

    Good article. My eyes were drawn towards your last three paragraphs.

    The problems faced by our cricketers have been well documented ever since I was a boy. The snide remarks, the put downs and the devaluation of their achievements during their era of dominance was sad and unjust. Even the incomparable Viv was considered by many British commentators as a slogger!

    The Caribbean region has always been severely handicapped by her leaders. They are corrupt. The region has always had an abundance of talented and creative men and women blessed with potential, who like their cricketers, have always been disrespected. Not by foreign journalists but by their very own leaders. The firewalls which should exist in a normal functional democracy – in order to protect her citizens – are non-existent in the Caribbean.

    How does the Caribbean rid themselves of their corrupt leaders? Is it necessary to hold elections in order to remove these corrupt leaders? If it can be proven that a leader is corrupt than he/she should be removed from office immediately. The constitution should not legitimise the status of a corrupt leader to remain in power.

    The UK conservative party – the party of David Cameron – is ruthless. When they tire of their leaders they are removed from office by their fellow party MP’S. If these MP’S perceive that their incumbent leader has become a liability they will oust him. For those MP’S it is irrelevant that a leader such as Cameron was voted in by the electorate; if he’s perceive as been a loser than he will be removed from office.

    Jeff, you should not concern yourself with HOW our leaders are removed from their post. If they are ineffective or worse corrupt and negligent and a menace to their people they should be removed from office.

    Like

  27. David April 10, 2016 at 6:09 PM #

    @Exclaimer

    Good to see you have come around and now find favour posting to his articles.

    Like

  28. Jeff Cumberbatch April 10, 2016 at 6:14 PM #

    David, a Damascene conversion, maybe? He means well.🙂

    “If they are ineffective or worse corrupt and negligent and a menace to their people they should be removed from office.”

    Agreed, Sir, but we currently have no constitutional means of doing so beyond the quinquennial ballot. Are you proposing another means?

    Like

  29. fortyacresandamule April 10, 2016 at 7:38 PM #

    I have no emotional investment in West indies cricket or sports for that matter. I have outgrown such childish distraction. However, I have serious reservation concerning a few CARICOM heads calling for its dissolution.Talk about pot calling kettle black. The plethora of CRITICAL issues affecting their own country and the region should be their priority. WICB is colonial vestige, I get that, but it is also a seperate legal entity and not a formal institution of CARICOM. It gets no budget support from CARICOM. It pays rent to stadium owners to host matches. CARICOM has nothing on WICB. The various football federations across the region, over the years, have brought more shame and notoriety to our shores than WICB. Yet, not one politician uttered a word of disapproval. I guess West Indies cricket is special and an exception: their colonial patrimony

    Like

  30. David April 10, 2016 at 7:42 PM #

    @fortyacresanamule

    Of course the WICB gets support VIA the territorial boards.

    Like

  31. fortyacresandamule April 10, 2016 at 8:12 PM #

    @David. So is all other national sport bodies and federations. The cricket associations is no exception. Please note: It is not CARICOM money.

    Like

  32. Colonel Buggy April 10, 2016 at 9:26 PM #

    The other, most distasteful ,B-Mex Show
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-35981727

    Like

  33. David April 12, 2016 at 1:16 AM #

    Champion … Champion … Champion

    Like

  34. Sunshine Sunny Shine April 12, 2016 at 5:58 AM #

    Mr. Cumberbatch

    Oh sweet, nice, articulate. Woo, ain’t you a nicely paid article writer. Mannnn, you are generating some commentary to your piece. Musse make you feel sa proud what you have achieved, nahh?. Nice little nest egg, moooney in de bank …look doan get tahhup yeahhhh! I tell ya. Handsome dude with the prestige of a university signature next to ya name. Musse mek you feel nice and proud to point out the facts. Keep within the nice little boundaries that just wrestle a few significant and insignificant feathers, but never to effect any real change. My first comment to anything you have written, not that I got anything against you or you writing, I think it is great. I just find it to be filled with the same puffed up shite that blow up the egos of those with a little education. Write pretty, talk pretty, laugh biguptity and remain in your comfort zone not caring who else are being discomforted by the disadvantages of the system. But I am not at war with you just the way you present fact to convince us lesser non fact foods why change is not inevitable.

    Like

  35. TheGazer April 12, 2016 at 9:14 AM #

    Damn, I don’t use anything except alcohol, but I awoke with some random thoughts.

    Let us assume that you are a trained dentist who has a relative with a tooth that hurts. The family runs to you as the dentist with a piece of string to pull the tooth. They remember how you were the one that love to pull teeth with a string; in fact it was this love that drove you to dentistry.

    But now your are qualified and more knowledgeable than years ago. You are aware of the possible complications and would prefer to have relative come in the office for a full exam instead of pull the tooth with a bit of string. The Bajan expression begin to roll out “book sense isn’t common sense” , “he has more learning, but he like he has become more ignorant “; once he would have pulled that tooth, but now he wants to make money on us”; etc.

    He probably did the right thing, but tell his family that.

    If I was a lawyer posting under my real name, I would be scared out of my mind…
    What if someone hijacked my name and made troublesome comments?
    What if a yard-fowl take things out of context and label me as supporting the other party?
    What if it appeared that I was preaching revolution, sedition, treason or any member of that family?
    What if I did not jump on a bandwagon, would it be taken as disapproval?
    I would probably write under one name and make comments under another. I would choose a name like “de pedantic ac”

    But I am blessed, I am not a lawyer writing under my own name; Went to cave Hill, but never went near the law school. Heck, I have nothing to fear and I post under a pseudonym.

    All characters appearing in this work are fictitious. Any resemblance to real persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

    Liked by 1 person

  36. Exclaimer April 12, 2016 at 2:23 PM #

    @ David,

    I don’t believe that Jeff loses any sleep at night on whether or not I reply to his posts!

    Some may find it strange that this intelligent and hardworking man would sully himself presenting a weekly column on this bear-pit of a forum. It is the equivalent of a professional boxer who switches his allegiance from fighting within a controlled and regulated boxing industry environment to an unregulated, no-holds bar, bare-knuckle, combat fight environment.

    I am sure that Jeff is drawing in many people who would have no interest in BU. I am also certain that he is learning a great deal. It takes a very intelligent person to understand the subtlety of Jeff’s writing. He is aware that when he writes his columns that he has to tread carefully. It is not what he says but how he says it. If he leaves certain things out it could be code that he may be nudging our thought process in an area which he dear not vocalise.

    https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2016/apr/12/the-dark-side-of-guardian-comments

    Like

  37. David April 12, 2016 at 2:59 PM #

    @Exclaimer

    Truth!

    Like

  38. alfred April 14, 2016 at 3:43 PM #

    fact, despite all the distaste that might be felt by many at his defiant and, some say, arrogant attitude, president Cameron is undeniably the constitutionally elected president of the WICB and calls for his involuntary removal or the dissolution of the current administration therefore arguably contradict the rule of law that should presumably govern regional affairs.

    Ironically, with the charge for this form of resolution being led by a few regional Prime Ministers, it should provide a teachable moment for each of them. They, likewise, enjoy their current status by virtue of a constitutionally legitimate election and appointment and would rightly consider it treasonable anarchy if it were seriously to be suggested that any of them should have his administration voluntarily or forcibly dissolved immediately because of apparent popular dissatisfaction.

    The effective solution, in my view, is not to set a roguish and scofflaw precedent of unconstitutionally removing an unpopular Board. It is for the “electorate” to do so according to the established rules; first, by each constituent body electing, to sit on the WICB, local representatives who are willing to commit to the constitutional reform of the present structure and thereby to popularize the governance of West Indies cricket. Or, as is our wont, are we prepared to talk about it only?

    Any other measure smacks of the paramountcy of personality; an agenda that has proven so far to be to our detriment in politics, law, cricket and much else in the region besides.”

    Much food for thought. If you only you could bring to bear such forthrightness in your comments on other issues languishing for such forthright analysis.

    Like

  39. pieceuhderockyeahright April 14, 2016 at 6:10 PM #

    Dear Suzanne,

    Read the Gazer at 9.14 a.m.

    He has in those lines “exposed” the heart of the man Jeff Cumberbatch.

    YOU DO NOT COME TO BU and post every week, because you want to be comfy.

    Imagine this obviously very intellectual man, choosing his words, studiedly.

    Here is a writer aware that on the left hand there are the incompetents of the DLP fold, who have sought to appease him, and have given him chairmanship of the Fear Trading Commission in Green Hill, the bane for all Internet technology initiatives in Barbados.

    While on his right the Troika in Waiting.

    I would ask you to use Jeff’s articles to play Sudoka in cyberspace and watch how carefully he is threading his words and his thoughts.

    Look back at the spate of articles that the man writes here.

    Look at the common thread, good governance, constitutional correctness, the laws of the land, and his questions to the commentators, “what other alternatives are they beyond the quinquennial ballot?”

    That is a big work yuh!

    Notice that Jeff CANNOT BE BAITED even by the old stalwarts for whereas a fellah would tell me something and I would rush into the fray to test my mettle, he lets the personal or clever academic baits pass, amusing though they may be (heheheheheh)

    What is fear? “fear ˈfir/ noun – an unpleasant emotion caused by the belief that someone or something is dangerous, likely to cause pain, or a threat.”

    What is wisdom? “the soundness of an action or decision with regard to the application of experience, knowledge, and good judgment…”

    Jeff Cumberbatch is not afraid of a fellah but he is wise enough to let both sides know that he is extremely knowledgeable, experienced and capable of exercising good judgement even in the most stressful of situations like those we are now facing.

    Imagine this!

    What if at the next general election the Troika enters the arena and, as some of us, including you fear, the LoO implements the Night of the Long Knives? as such relates to all who have in these years, spoken anything against her?

    What will this man in his middle years do? Uproot himself from home and practice and comfort to run to the north with Dribbler, and Northern and Hants? (You do note that I have not mentioned your name for, I too will have to run and I don,t want them in Europe)

    We can all pray for Damascene moments for despots and incompetents on either side but, as Jeff shows us, sometimes it is better to remain quiet and not be as obvious as **

    Even AC, with her party at the steering wheel driving us over the precipice, has chosen to be an “anonymice”.

    And if she, one of the Very Legion who feeds on the “fatted calf” of the dead king, prefers to hide under the cloak of anonymity, then you can see why Jeff Cumberbatch, 100 times wiser than all of Legion, would use his words thusly.

    Here is your first poster developed from your words on April 14, 2016 at 6:14 AM

    Like

  40. pieceuhderockyeahright April 15, 2016 at 4:08 AM #

    And if only to underscore what I said earlier look at what Jeff writes

    “In fact, despite all the distaste that might be felt by many at his defiant and, some say, arrogant attitude, president Cameron [Maria Agard] is undeniably the constitutionally elected president of the WICB [representative for the Ch. Ch constituency] and calls for his [her] involuntary removal [acts per her dismissal from the BLP] or the dissolution of the current administration therefore arguably contradict the rule of law that should presumably govern regional [BLP party] affairs.

    He then continues, as if echoing the age old “live by the sword by by the sword” observation and speaks to how such treatment of leaders under “apparent popular dissatisfaction” might be construed (and anarchy possible even treason? worthy of shooting a few people and cracking a few skulls).

    Look further as he says

    “The effective solution, in my view, is not to set a roguish and scofflaw precedent of unconstitutionally removing an unpopular Board [party member]

    and then closes off magnificently with this belly searcher in his alloted 650 words

    “Any other measure smacks of the paramountcy of personality; an agenda that has proven so far to be to our detriment in politics…”

    Read between the lines.

    But then again, I just heah cyan sleep again, and typing way pun de ipad, seeking fleeting sleep, “to sleep, perchance to dream ay, there’s the rub.” but such sleep, rather lack thereof, I am told, is the bane of men who have killed (a priest)…”

    Of course Mr. Cumberbatch will not write such Enigma Codes so this is the rambling of age in the Quiet of the Night

    Like

  41. Dompey April 15, 2016 at 5:43 AM #

    Piece

    Give yourself much credit because in my book you’re one if not the most gifted intellectually here on BU.

    Like

  42. Sunshine Sunny Shine April 15, 2016 at 6:06 AM #

    My Sweet Piece

    Now seeing this as I do not really visit Mr. Cumberbatch’s articles. I also want to say that I am not at war with Mr. Jeff Cumberbatch. He serves his purpose even if there is no cause. I have read one single article he wrote and it is this one. I won’t comment any further on that. From what I can see, BU puts up his articles, he comes on to see how many comments, he reads a few comments, he makes a few comments and that is that. He has served his purpose. I have provided him with three topics he could explore on another topic. To each’s own.

    Like

  43. David April 15, 2016 at 6:32 AM #

    @PUDRYR

    You need to give Grenville et al some slack. Grenville does not have to become involved in politics like some of the half-baked ones in parliament. Give them a chance to express themselves. People like Jeff given their public positions have to work within the system while at the same time calling for change. It will take all types and forms.

    And he uses his real name.

    Liked by 1 person

  44. de pedantic Dribbler April 15, 2016 at 7:11 AM #

    @Pieces, well stated at April 14, 6:10 PM and April 15 , 4:08 AM …although I thought @Gazer was a touch too strong when he stated: “The Bajan expression begin to roll out “book sense isn’t common sense” and tacitly summarized with ” He probably did the right thing, but tell his family that.”

    It would be tantamount to professional suicide for that dentist NOT to very carefully and cautiously exercise his dentistry skills…family or no family if something went horribly wrong there would still be a law-suit and Mr Dentist would incur major problems going forward…so there is no ‘ifs’. He DID the right thing.

    Similarly, @Jeff does the right thing weekly in his Advocate column which is reproduced here…he maintains careful professional prose in his pieces on the “.. good governance, constitutional correctness, the laws of the land”.

    Thus I found his jousting with @Heather and @SSS amusing …. or as you highlighted with the quote viz “what other alternatives are they beyond the quinquennial ballot?”.

    So indeed, how else should the Dean of a Law School respond or advise other than as he did. The gentleman comes over as a genuine fighter for justice who obviously has to carefully navigate the waters of often churning rapids.

    Remember, Gladstone Holder…boy oh boy I used to struggle with his essays as a lad wid dem words…but struggle I did until I no longer had to struggle…he hit hard (depending on target) in his retirement years.

    Similarly one can imagine Jeff swiping that pen more lustily when ‘retired’ is affixed to his name. For now careful and professional guides the way as you allude to.

    Incidentally, the WICB matter is rather interesting as in fact the WICB THEMSELVES have commissioned several reports on their governance which they have NOT heeded. Obviously the Heads of Caricom cannot be allowed to usurp or effect a ‘putsch’ of duly elected representatives but with that same breath it can also be said that this BVI incorporated company cannot fly in the face of credible and professional governance so repeatedly!

    Like

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