crime_and_violence

Rising Crime in the Region – A Word to the Wise Should Suffice

Submitted by the Mahogany Coconut Group

De-Nelson Smith and Mark Richards In almost every sphere-the economy, education, agriculture, health, national security, and transportation-we are living the logical outcome of over 50 years of policy failure.

As in the case of Dudus and Trenchtown in Jamaica, our communities have developed into hot spots because weak and ineffective politicians have entered into dangerous alliances with community criminals in order to control the vote.

Sunity Maharaj, Trinidad Express, Sunday, January 24th. 2016

Last Thursday’s murder, assassination, slaughter or whatever horrific description we choose to give it, of two teenage school boys in Trinidad and Tobago, brought home to our T and T brothers and sisters, the level to which their country has declined in the last two decades. Apparently, these two youngsters were dragged out of a mini bus and murdered in broad day light. The short lives of De-Nelson Smith and Mark Richards did not reach their full potential and once more our Caribbean has been robbed of much needed talent.

For some time now, the Mahogany Coconut Group, has eschewed political posturing and has concentrated on highlighting both the negatives and positives of the Caribbean region. We have maintained that the destruction of the environment and the rising crime, in the region represent a threat more dire than any underperforming economy. We have said that replacing destroyed features of our environment will perhaps be impossible but replacing lives is totally impossible.

We have witnessed in almost total shock how the criminal element in T and T has effectively brought the law enforcement professionals (police) to their knees. There seems to be a total disregard for life. Unfortunately the criminal element has also been very active brutalizing women and inflicting much harm on children. The simple truth is that the country is under persistent siege. The Prime Minister, Dr. Keith Rowley, has been forced to deploy the army to deal with the so-called hot spots of crime. It is a sad spectacle that a fun loving and hospitable people are now prisoners in their homes. They are afraid to even do such basic tasks as putting their garbage outside their homes.

However, as the erudite Sunity Maharaj, quoted above, we are aware that criminal activity is not unique to Tand T. Her point is that social decay when it first appears must be dealt with swiftly. Her mentioning of Jamaica is therefore instructive. In Barbados, its citizens are witnessing an upsurge in gun related crimes and murders. Should the authorities there refuse to take stock and root out the criminal element, MCG is convinced that country will suffer a similar fate. Indeed the entire region needs to destroy its criminal element now before it is too late and too many lives are taken.

Unfortunately, we can say without fear of contradiction, that the two paragraphs quoted at the beginning of this article/post can be applied to the entire region known as CARICOM.

A word to the wise should suffice.

William Skinner, Communications Director, MCG, 1/24/16

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21 Comments on “Rising Crime in the Region – A Word to the Wise Should Suffice”

  1. Shaft January 25, 2016 at 8:00 AM #

    Votes equals power, money and a nice pension at the end of MPs terms in office! These roots MUST be dug up and burn..!

    Like

  2. Violet C Beckles January 25, 2016 at 12:35 PM #

    Shaft January 25, 2016 at 8:00 AM @ You may not know how Right you are, Nasty below all nasty we are dealing with , Gut them like the PIGS they are,

    Like

  3. Vincent Haynes January 25, 2016 at 1:03 PM #

    On Brasstacks now,Sir COW is threatning to pull his plantations out of agriculture as the criminal who killed his bulls worth $6000.00 got a 9 month reprimand whereas a thief in a supermaket got to serve 3 months for stealing cheese,crackers and cigarettes.

    Justice Bajan fashion…..should please the bashers of the Williams clan.

    Like

  4. David January 25, 2016 at 1:27 PM #

    @Vincent

    Agree with him. We can look at those apprehended with a few grams of weed as well and tossed in prison.

    Like

  5. lawson January 25, 2016 at 2:30 PM #

    That is because it is not a crime to shoot the bull in Barbados,when will you people learn that crime doesn’t pay as well as politics

    Like

  6. MCG January 25, 2016 at 6:12 PM #

    ” We consider praedial larceny to be one of the most serious crimes in the region. We suggest that the minimum fine for any act of praedial larceny should be $25,000.00 and five years imprisonment.”
    Mahogany Coconut Group February 1st. 2013. Crime Part 3 Solutions.

    Like

  7. Sunshine Sunny Shine January 26, 2016 at 3:13 AM #

    Did the Prime Minister not bought a whole set of riot gear and other ammunitions in anticipation of an escalation in crime due to his austerity plan`? This means that he, Fruendel Stuart had a prognostication that things would become progressively worse. Therefore, all Williams have to do is fashion his prize bulls with technology and take matters into his own hands since the judicial process in Barbados is just as mad as the decisions being made by this government. If the government foresaw the coming of more bad then Williams should know that leaving your bulls out to pasture is inviting the night butchers to take the axe to the beef. Its no longer business as usual in Barbados. Secure it and when the intruder comes, execute an act of Vigilante law.

    Like

  8. Hants January 26, 2016 at 10:13 AM #

    Another murder in Grenada. A month ago a Canadian now an American.

    http://www.nydailynews.com/news/world/ga-woman-slain-vacationing-grenada-resort-article-1.2509366

    Like

  9. Hants January 26, 2016 at 10:28 AM #

    praedial larceny is a serious crime. It involves “trespassing”, Stealing and destruction of property.

    Think of the small farmer who ploughs his land, fertilizes it, plants a crop and waters and weeds it for a couple months then to have a thief deprive him of said crop.

    Five years in prison is reasonable for the crime.

    Like

  10. Well Well & Consequences January 26, 2016 at 11:18 AM #

    Hants…it’s a well known national past time in the islands, everyone falls victim, even the ministry of agriculture, I remembered some years ago some dudes backed up some trucks and stole acres of cassava, put it on the market too. There is always talk, but nothing ever done to stop the practice.

    Like

  11. Hants January 26, 2016 at 12:06 PM #

    The bad thing about this crime is that the farmer has to pay all the upfront costs and wait until the crops are “ripe” before he can sell them.

    Similarly Cow had to do the same with his cattle. Imagine the people who would lose their jobs if Cow shuts down his farms.

    Like

  12. Well Well & Consequences January 26, 2016 at 12:28 PM #

    They need more farms on the island and more protection for farmers, all they been doing for years is talking and saying they have no money.

    Like

  13. David January 26, 2016 at 12:37 PM #

    We keep focusing on the acts which are outcomes of a lack of will and discipline by our leaders to make better.

    Like

  14. ac January 26, 2016 at 1:58 PM #

    It is time barbadians take full responsibilty for their posessions by investing some of their earning or profits towards the protection of their businesses. If society expect an all out effort for govt to foot private owners ship cost due to losses perpetrated through acts of violence .Then eventually the taxpayer would be asked to pay the bill

    Like

  15. David January 26, 2016 at 2:05 PM #

    @William

    The issue raised by you should be of serious concern to Barbadians. What has separated Barbados from Jamaica, Guyana, Trinidad and other islands has been a very low crime rate and the absence of violent crimes. This has changed and we are catching up to our illustrious neighbours. Yet as a society we continue to do the same things all the while expecting a different result.

    Like

  16. William Skinner January 26, 2016 at 3:47 PM #

    @ David,
    Our entire island is in a state of absolute denial about everything. Until we discard hypocrisy and political yardfowlism AT ALL LEVELS there really is no hope. We also have to remove those presently controlling the national dialogue. We need new independent voices. The land must be cleared before we plant the new crop.

    Like

  17. ac January 26, 2016 at 6:34 PM #

    How about starting at looking at self for “new”and independant voice. No sense looking at the outside. If an individual have something that can be of beneficial to country get out of the comfort box and proceed with haste
    Just maybe that independent voice is yours.

    Like

  18. William Skinner January 26, 2016 at 6:37 PM #

    @ ac,
    I am involved with some projects. Unfortunately it is quite difficult to get interest or commitment from many who want to fix the engine but do not want grease on their hands.

    Like

  19. ac January 26, 2016 at 7:23 PM #

    Look the truth that many who are quick to crticise refrain from entering the lions den of politics out of a fear of inhibition and a fear of being caught in the same net of boisterous critcism by society

    Like

  20. William Skinner January 27, 2016 at 12:34 AM #

    @ ac
    It is not the fear of entering the “lions den of politics” alone. It is really a type of self preservation. In many instances people do not see any hope and they fear not only political activity but social activism . Its unlike the 60s and early 70s when we were rapping and reading.

    Like

  21. Exclaimer April 12, 2016 at 4:25 PM #

    “A young British cricketer has been shot dead during a suspected armed robbery in Trinidad.

    Adrian St John, who was on holiday on the island, was reportedly attacked on Sunday night by two men.”

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/adrian-st-john-young-british-cricketer-shot-dead-in-apparent-armed-robbery-while-on-holiday-in-a6979801.html

    Like

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