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The Emergence of a New Black Middleclass

middleclassA big part of what troubles the Barbados society can be attributed to the rise of a Black middleclass. In spite of billions of dollars invested in this group through ‘free’ education, instead of practically applying the knowledge acquired by actively participating in the management of the social and economic demands of the country, the majority have opted to indolently go about their business.

What defines the wants of this group is a trip to Disney World every other year, a greater than $500,000 mortgage to secure a house in a built up neighbourhood with an SUV or two in the driveway, monthly attendance at one of the many fetes or shows at a cost of at least two or three grantleys. The higher the cost of the ticket the louder the bragging rights via exchanges on Facebook or Whatsapp on the $1,800 smartphone. Last but not least is the offshore account or safety deposit box where hard currency is deposited. This group appears to seek solace in the activity demanded to climbing the career ladder and expanding a social network. Although some join philanthropic associations it is to pad the bio rather than out of a heartfelt need to give back to the society. This a group more interested in discussing news that originate ‘over and away’ rather than local or regional. No interest to form groups to advocate for causes. Leave it to others they say. Let them earn the $10,000 plus salary to feed the addiction to conspicuous consumption.

What is scary about the solidification of the group is the code of behaviour that now defines how business is done in Barbados. A good example can be gleaned in the Things Fall Apart – Caribbean Export Style expose. Distribute the aid or grant money to those favoured based on the pecking order in the social network, university attended or while liming at a Bliss fete. Why should we expect the minister of finance or tourism to make decisions in the interest of the people who elected them if personal relationships within the social network ultimately guide final decision making? Extend this approach to other areas of society where decisions have to be made and the problem builds. Those who do not want to be compliant are jettisoned to the outer band of the group unable to achieve significant upward movement career or otherwise.

Special mention of the minority members who break ranks to exercise a right to share a dissenting view especially against the political directorate. The political class, predominantly Black, will ‘starve’ these uppity members, they will be made to suck salt, withstand the worse tales and gossip.

A new year has just started and worrying is the thought that corruption in high places that use to fester at the top now has permeated to the bottom of the society. We are a predominantly Black country after all.

49 Comments on “The Emergence of a New Black Middleclass”

  1. Shaft January 1, 2016 at 2:45 AM #

    Black middle class in Barbados, now that’s interesting..! Oops, just fell off my chair laughing. Are we talking about the Island in the Atlantic that has taken more of the Queen’s sliver (Knighthoods, MBEs, OBEs, CBEs etc) than all the other Islands combined..?!
    Why don’t we talk about something more taxing… …ah yes, “Taxation!”

    Like

  2. Well Well & Consequences2 January 1, 2016 at 3:37 AM #

    I think it would be more productive in 2016, if the bribe taking leaders of DBLP would do something for once in their miserably selfish lives and get rid of the blight to the island that Peter Harris has become. Harris, like Parris are both monsters created by DBLP and they have a duty to the island to rid the people of this monster…….their own creation.

    It’s unfair that people living outside of Barbados are the ones who had to recently bring Harris to the attention of international authorities re insurance scams and money laundering, because there is no such regulation in Barbados, while FSC and Frank Alleyne, Central Bank and Delisle Worrell, DPP Charles Leacock who is responsible for prosecuting crimes etc, sit on their greedy asses contemplating their next bribe, instead of penalizing that dude Harris for his years of escalating law breaking on the island.

    If the middle class or anything else is to be saved, first those who are destroying the very progress of the country have to be removed by their enablers ….DBLP POLITICIANS. I personally would much prefer see them all made embarrassed by an international probe.

    Those pretentious OBE’s etc AKA….. useless pimphood titles out of buckingham palace…..have only succeeded in making crooks out of all the pretentious people whose only ambition is to receive them, they are all laughing stocks, as is befitting their pretentious status.

    Like

  3. Bush Tea January 1, 2016 at 7:33 AM #

    Substitute the words ‘middle class’ with the much more appropriate ‘brass bowls’ and this article is bang on target.

    Like

  4. Vincent Haynes January 1, 2016 at 8:02 AM #

    Crabs in a barrel covers it.

    Like

  5. ac January 1, 2016 at 8:15 AM #

    An interesting article but nothing surprising people would always attended to self interest and what ever crumbs fall to the ground be enough for those of lesser influence to fight over
    Some of the so called middle class in barbados believe they have a god given right to entitlement their voices can be heard daily on social media not as advocates for giving back but with outrageous demands wrapped in a right of privilege expecting more of govt and giving back little or not much in return
    Most of them spend sleepless hours planning how to divert govt attention away from the social and economic need and refocus govt plans and ideas on the needs and wants of own interest
    Case and point the burdening issue of govt debt when meticulously scrutinized includes large debt fees owed in taxes owed by these so called black middle class who refuse to pay but expect govt forgiveness resulting in a the heavy price which the lower class will have to pay socially and economically

    Like

  6. David January 1, 2016 at 8:19 AM #

    @Bush Tea and Vincent

    It is easy to blame but the characteristics of the Black middle class is symptomatic of a bigger issue. Perhaps the know not?

    Like

  7. William Skinner January 1, 2016 at 8:55 AM #

    @ ac
    “Some of the so called middle class in barbados believe they have a god given right to entitlement their voices can be heard daily on social media not as advocates for giving back but with outrageous demands wrapped in a right of privilege expecting more of govt and giving back little or not much in return
    Most of them spend sleepless hours planning how to divert govt attention away from the social and economic need and refocus govt plans and ideas on the needs and wants of own interest
    Case and point the burdening issue of govt debt when meticulously scrutinized includes large debt fees owed in taxes owed by these so called black middle class who refuse to pay but expect govt forgiveness resulting in a the heavy price which the lower class will have to pay socially and economically”

    This is indeed a very profound and accurate statement to start of discussion in 2016. While I totally agree with your assessment, I am still convinced that we are promoting people to the middle class more by their professions than their income. For example, do we consider a mechanic whose income is easily more than a teacher or bank worker, , middle class by our standards? While this “god given right to entitlement” is widespread within the middle class, is it not true that lower income/class citizens also feel this way by refusing to pay heavily subsidized rent for government units?
    I think that we need to be intellectually honest when discussing socio-economic issues. The truth is that there is a feeling of entitlement running throughout the country. It is very pervasive and must be stopped. It seems that everybody believes they are entitled. For example, rich business elites believe they are entitled to concessions from a government that is essentially broke. And the lawyer class believes it is entitled to its clients’ money……..and we can go on and on. Let us not forget the political class , they believe that they are entitled to frig up the entire country and are not accountable to anybody !!!

    Like

  8. ac January 1, 2016 at 9:28 AM #

    @ WS can agree with your assessment .However the burdening and shouldering lies with those who have accessed and benefited substantially the most from our free education The mechanic earnings are mostly derived from a process due in large part of living in a democratic capitalist society However his earnings are not a reflection of his status and influence to making necessary change or even come close to having the same status as those in the professional fields of doctors lawyers or politicians where the influence of status gives substantial leverage and a free pass to accommodation

    Like

  9. David January 1, 2016 at 9:31 AM #

    @William

    You should reread the last paragraph of the article. The problem gets bigger.

    Like

  10. Well Well & Consequences2 January 1, 2016 at 9:51 AM #

    AC…..for the new year just tell yourself that government does not have any burden, they have greedy, self-serving politicians, the burden always lies on the shoulders of the taxpayers, what burden on government what….

    Like

  11. ac January 1, 2016 at 10:03 AM #

    @WS the need for concessions can also be placed on the shoulders of high affluent middle class who rather not use their access to free education to build a barbados socially and economically but would rather used all their energy to brag about how much they have achieved for self, whilst country seek other avenues for financial recourse at the hands of outside influences
    Yes indeed the nastiness that exist and floats like shite to the top lies solely within a mindset stagnated within the society of greed anti patriotic behavior and a undisciplined character of decadence

    Like

  12. William Skinner January 1, 2016 at 10:22 AM #

    @ ac
    Agreed . In Barbados when we talk about the middle class, we are talking mainly about the black bajans. Let us accept that they are not as patriotic as they should be. Now let us move on to the whites syrians jews indians and other minority groups that have more ready cash than the black middle class. They are also raping the country and giving very little in return. they too believe that they are entitled to excessive profits and can sit back and control the black political class. I find it very strange that Rihana can give the hospital millions in such a short period of success while these extremely rich bajans would not do so. If this discussion can continue free of the usual party positioning , you would have opened a can of worms.

    Like

  13. William Skinner January 1, 2016 at 10:28 AM #

    @ David
    “A new year has just started and worrying is the thought that corruption in high places that use to fester at the top now has permeated to the bottom of the society. We are a predominantly Black country after all.”

    If the above is the last paragraph to which you refer no one can seriously question its accuracy. However there is an old saying that if you want to know if a fish is bad , you have to smell the head. Now the graft and corruption at the top sets the tone. A prime example is CLICO: Not one person has been investigated or is facing jail. Who en hanging out in Miami living like lords in the Caribbean. So dont fool yuh self when de unemployed man on the block see the big boys ripping off people and getting away wid um, he uses dat as his moral compass.

    Like

  14. David January 1, 2016 at 10:29 AM #

    The point is we are not getting the return given our investment in education.

    Like

  15. de Ingrunt Word January 1, 2016 at 10:58 AM #

    @David January 1, 2016 at 9:31 AM …re “@William, You should reread the last paragraph of the article. The problem gets bigger.” BIGGER, how?…But first, wishing you, your team and the other regular BU denizens the absolute very best in 2016 !

    …So, exactly how much bigger can it get than @William’s “It seems that everybody believes they are entitled”? You spoke also about pervasive corruption and noted “We are a predominantly Black country after all”. Let’s also wrap our heads around your other statement “instead of practically applying the knowledge acquired … the majority have opted to indolently go about their business”.

    It seems you (we all really) want to skirt around the real hard truths of this Bajan society. Doesn’t sociology speak of ANY ‘middle-class’ in the same way that you have done here? Don’t psychologists speak of comfort zones and such that also describes this mentality?

    I do not pretend to be either but both you and @William have described a reality of the comfort zone or being unkind ‘indolence’ that permeates us and many other societies where people believe they have ‘arrived’.

    What also amuses me with all the various discussions you have engendered on this topic is that folks here speak in the ‘third-person’ like ‘most of them’. Yet, its fair to guesstimate that 99% of the folks here would be described as ‘middle-class’: educated, interested in social issues, doctors, lawyers, professional, blue-collar successes, comparatively well-off etc etc.

    But what is most amusing. You spoke above re the Caribbean Export Style issue and added how monies were distributed based on pecking order. Surely I am not the only person who recognizes that for many of the last 50 years that dynamic has been taken place with BLACKS in charge of the ‘Tammany Hall’ spoils .

    We have the reins of power now – for all intents and purposes – so why are you so amazed at current trends and facts!

    The same stories Colonel Buggy and others recently told of the land-gentry having the special church pews etc is today’s very same dynamic in ‘Black Colour’ with the country-club membership, professional snobbery, ‘crookery’ and corruption.

    David, let’s be frank, honest and upfront: The Black middle class as you term us are ‘supported’ by the largess of a BLACK upper-class. We support or suppress the Black lower class. This is the SAME dynamic that took place generations ago when another group where in charge. So being a ‘predominantly Black country’ simply means that all the graft and malfeasance is originating from non-Caucasians.

    How absolutely hilarious that there is some expectation on anyone’s part that Black folks would be less susceptible to corruption, scandal, prejudice (racism), snobbery, deceitfulness, ostentatious greed, trips off-the-island or other trappings of superiority displayed by other groups many eons ago. We are educated – $$Billions, as you highlighted – and thus now know ALL the tricks!

    Quite frigging funny if one suspends all reality!

    Like

  16. William Skinner January 1, 2016 at 11:01 AM #

    @ David,
    The current education system is now at the diminishing returns stage. The system itself is basically archaic and the production line can only produce what it was intended to. I note that you are not addressing the greed of the wealthy minorities.

    Like

  17. de Ingrunt Word January 1, 2016 at 11:13 AM #

    @David January 1, 2016 at 10:29 AM…re “point is we are not getting the return given our investment in education”. No David. Schools have long stopped teaching us how to act as men or women. Ethical behaviour.

    Based on that I disagree with your point as we have turned out excellent scientists, lawyers, doctors, mechanics et al. We have sent many to top worldwide institutions. Our investment in education has shown much fruit.

    However, it does not take a fancy education to know what is corrupt or what is unethical. That we learn around 12 – 15 years of age. That is where this wonderful country has failed. No one (in power) seems willing to stand up for a legal, ethical mode of operation.

    @Well Well & Consequences2 January 1, 2016 at 3:37 …your Harris rant becomes rather hollow after a careful review…simply because he is just the latest or most current puppet-master. When he is removed is it your belief that some wonderful benefactor will take his place? Or will another master or masters replace him with equal facility to pull the strings?

    If the man and his associates have done illegal things then he should be prosecuted…that’s clear. He would not be the first mover and shaker to avoid local traps but get caught in an external noose…and surely will not be the last.

    Like

  18. ac January 1, 2016 at 11:20 AM #

    William skinner
    I am still convinced that we are promoting people to the middle class more by their professions than their income. For example, do we consider a mechanic whose income is easily more than a teacher or bank worker, , middle class by our standards? While this “god given right to entitlement” is widespread within the middle class, is it not true that lower income/class citizens also feel this way by refusing to pay heavily subsidized rent for government units?
    ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… I am still convinced that we are promoting people to the middle class more by their professions than their income.

    William yes but that high and mighty mindset has been ingrained in Barbados mentality for years taught from childhood explicitly demonstrated and show cased with often from the mouths of adults who in earnest boast of their child’s achievement of entering the better or best learning institute setting a foundation of leverage upon leaving school
    Even though it is a symbol of reward vs achievement it also send a loaded message with a loopsided approach intentionally to ostracize others who cannot reach such merit or standards

    /////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

    is it not true that lower income/class citizens also feel this way by refusing to pay heavily subsidized rent for government units?
    ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,

    Yes! but everything in its right context would give the right answer
    The lower class has been disadvantage anything when compared to the middle class what little leverage they have is muted and only can be used at time of voting .Do they have a right for entitlement like those who have benefited the most , Hell yes! especially when not given equal access in terms of wealth distribution! equal education! access and availability to financial empowerment all of which are necessary tools for advance progress and political influence

    Like

  19. Colonel Buggy January 1, 2016 at 11:25 AM #

    de Ingrunt Word January 1, 2016 at 10:58 AM #

    David, let’s be frank, honest and upfront: The Black middle class as you term us are ‘supported’ by the largess of a BLACK upper-class. We support or suppress the Black lower class. This is the SAME dynamic that took place generations ago when another group where in charge. So being a ‘predominantly Black country’ simply means that all the graft and malfeasance is originating from non-Caucasians.
    …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
    As ably demonstrated here in St Joseph when water was diverted to a development where the Central Bank Governor and his cronies reside,and to hell with the working class.

    Like

  20. William Skinner January 1, 2016 at 11:29 AM #

    @ de Ingrunt World
    “David, let’s be frank, honest and upfront: The Black middle class as you term us are ‘supported’ by the largess of a BLACK upper-class. We support or suppress the Black lower class. This is the SAME dynamic that took place generations ago when another group where in charge. So being a ‘predominantly Black country’ simply means that all the graft and malfeasance is originating from non-Caucasians.

    How absolutely hilarious that there is some expectation on anyone’s part that Black folks would be less susceptible to corruption, scandal, prejudice (racism), snobbery, deceitfulness, ostentatious greed, trips off-the-island or other trappings of superiority displayed by other groups many eons ago. We are educated – $$Billions, as you highlighted – and thus now know ALL the tricks!

    Quite frigging funny if one suspends all reality!”

    I have absolutely no quarrel with your post. As I said once this topic is discussed openly and free from party diatribe, we are going to have to deal with some ugly truths. Man this is so much like Animal Farm, in some respects but we can’t handle the truth. You will note that Sir Othneil Williams cuss out he workers and not one of the black parliamentarians cannot say a word. You will also note that in this very discussion we dont want to be critical of the whites, indians, jews, syrians and other minorities.

    Like

  21. de Ingrunt Word January 1, 2016 at 12:55 PM #

    @William Skinner January 1, 2016 at 11:29 AM… you are right that ” we can’t handle the truth.” We get worked up by the remarks by Sir Othneil Williams but to your point we don’t appreciate that all the power-brokers (White and Black) are comprehensively linked and supported by the Black parliamentarians and political class.

    The class and group are worst than all the White folks who have ever gone before, the Williams who give vent to frustration with caustic words or those White faces who are yet to come…because although they suffer the same indignities as other Blacks when they are on a street in London or NY trying to get a taxi or if stopped by a police-officer in some US red-state suburb yet when in their little local fiefdoms they treat fellow Blacks with such disdain – whether directly and indirectly via a COW or a CLICO.

    That truth is very stark and painful…for some I suppose.

    Like

  22. Simple Simon January 1, 2016 at 1:13 PM #

    ‘morning David. Happy New Year to you and to yours.

    I guess that I don’t qualify as middle class

    “trip to Disney World every other year”

    Made one trip to Disney and even though it was quite nice I do not want to go again. I’d rather take a real walk in one of Barbados’ real, real gullies.

    “a greater than $500,000 mortgage to secure a house in a built up neighbourhood”

    Bought land at $1.50 per sq ft. [that is one dollar and fifty cents] Borrowed $110,000 from the bank. Don’t want to go there again either. Lol!!!

    “an SUV or two”

    No SUV. No car even. Shoot, not even a bicycle. My two feet and ZR vans, and the big blues (Transport Board buses). Let somebody else worry about gas, and maintenance and insurance, and replacement costs etc.

    “monthly attendance at one of the many fetes or shows at a cost of at least two or three grantleys.”

    What??? $200 and $300 fetes when Q in the community is free. Stupseee!!!!!! people don’t know what to do with good money.

    “exchanges on Facebook”

    No Facebook. Why would I talk out my business with all of the 3 billion people on Facebook? If I have something to say, or better still to do with an ex or even a present, $2.00 on the ZR gets me to the right place, and the right person right on time.

    “or Whatsapp”

    I must admit that I love my Whatsapp but only when free free Wi-Fi is available. Lots of nice hot spots around too. So $10 per month on my $139.95 smart phone and I am good.

    “on the $1,800 smartphone.”

    Got my smart phone on special (last year’s model) for $139.95, and that included $10 free credit. It does all that I want it to do, and if it is lost or stolen I don’t care.

    “Last but not least is the offshore account or safety deposit box where hard currency is deposited. ”

    Alas, alas, alas, no offshore account or safety deposit box. If I have any left over money after being so cheap I spend it on the people around me.

    So no leftover money either. Neither here or there.

    Like

  23. Simple Simon January 1, 2016 at 1:19 PM #

    @David January 1, 2016 at 10:29 AM “The point is we are not getting the return given our investment in education.”

    Just to clarify. Both the Barbadosgovernment and my parents stopped spending money on me as soon as I turned 18.

    Like

  24. Vincent Haynes January 1, 2016 at 1:56 PM #

    David

    Defining class can be a difficult exercise as some people are born into classes,some people can possess money and still be considered lower class and some can be poor and still deemed to be upper class.

    Like SS I am definitely not middle class as I do not do or possess any of the things
    mentioned above.

    We are getting the return on the investment in education as no where in our educational system does it teach you to be your brothers keeper or look out for your fellow man.

    DIW is spot on with his postings.

    Like

  25. David January 1, 2016 at 2:04 PM #

    @Vincent

    How does education play the part to propel us to the perfect ‘society’.

    Like

  26. Vincent Haynes January 1, 2016 at 2:28 PM #

    @David January 1, 2016 at 2:04 PM #

    Our educational system like so much else around us was not created to address our needs and sorry to say there is no such thing as a perfect society or perfect anything,the most one can do is to aim for acceptable traits to suit ones society.

    Like

  27. flyonthewall January 1, 2016 at 2:33 PM #

    Before 1966 and even for a while after, the social structure of Barbados was quite stratified. It looked like a pyramid, with the so-called planter class at the top with the merchant class right below. But since WW 2 that top line had become increasingly blurred because of intermarriage and changes in plantation ownership. Then you had the professional class: lawyers, doctors and chartered accountants and so forth. White people dominated these so called “classes”. Middle class was equated with the mainly black civil service and small tradespeople who owned their own businesses. That pyramid is a lot flatter today, and the lines are a lot less clear. There is no planter class left; only old names that are fading away with time. The business class and the professional classes are in the ascendancy, and are heavily represented by Black Barbadians. There has been a tremendous amount of “economic mobility” among Blacks over the past 50 years, especially in the professions. Problem is, even as Blacks have moved up economically, and Barbados is now awash with “new money”, many are still very unsure of their “social” standing. “Status Anxiety” now has thousands of newly affluent Barbadians by the throat. They are absolutely terrified that they may be “mistakenly” placed on too low a rung of the social ladder. So they spend money on conspicuous consumption; the operating philosophy being that the more conspicuous the spending the higher your perceived status. It doesn’t help matters that a tidal wave of narcissism — a diva/fashionista culture — is engulfing our society. But that’s another story.

    Like

  28. ac January 1, 2016 at 2:42 PM #

    ‘Poor and deemed “upper class according to whose standards the status of being poor and “upper class “would only be so guided by a spiritual recognition and not by societies guidelines as to the true meaning of “upper class”
    A poor man riding a bicycle as a means of transportation or working in median jobs would not be recognized as upper class according to today’s standards although one might qualify if there are a couple of degrees attached but not necessarily be granted full recognition of upper class
    The question also being if an individual coming from upper class family falls on hard times into poverty brings the same level of status and a right of passage,,, In Barbadian society the individual coming from high status and falls into difficult times leading to poverty is shunned ! locked out or avoided and seen as a piranha or useless serving
    Upper class means that an individual has arrived at the highest level in society that few can achieved and maintains the power or wealth

    Like

  29. David January 1, 2016 at 3:10 PM #

    @Vincent

    Note perfect society was cloaked in inverted commas. It is about being the best we can be both socially and economically

    Like

  30. Vincent Haynes January 1, 2016 at 3:41 PM #

    @David January 1, 2016 at 3:10 PM #

    Yes I realised that but thought the broader point should be made about conforming to the norms of ones society as societies do differ.

    Like

  31. bookworm January 2, 2016 at 7:33 AM #

    A very interesting discussion,free of personal insults and invective. It is to be hoped that this will continue into 2016.

    Happy New Year to all.

    Like

  32. David January 2, 2016 at 7:55 AM #

    @bookworm

    Happy New Year to you and feel free to join the discussion.

    Like

  33. bookworm January 2, 2016 at 9:29 AM #

    I agree with much of what has been said. However greed,corruption and climbing the greasy class pole are not the sole prerogative of the middle and upper classes.
    How many of our politicians,and lawyers came from poor families and are now richer than Croesus? Is it because they saved their salary and made wise investments? Or is it because they raped the treasury,destroyed the economy and demanded a kick back for every contract and permit they grant?
    We all know politicians who start their career driving clapped out 4th hand Japanese imports but now drive big fat Mercedes. They must be financial wizards to do that on an MP salary.

    I give you this thought, in Barbados lawyers charge according to a laid down list of charges. There is no competition for work as these charges have been set by Parliament and are enshrined in law.The reasoning is that if all charge the same you are assured of a good lawyer. Really? They believe this? It comes as no shock that most politicians are lawyers.

    In more enlightened societies this is known as price fixing and is illegal.

    Like

  34. Hants January 2, 2016 at 10:19 AM #

    “So says Minister of Industry Donville Inniss, who assured Barbadians that help was on the way, but warned against “dangerous thoughts” of causing social unrest over the current water woes.”

    http://www.nationnews.com/nationnews/news/76212/working-on-it#sthash.MWpELBsj.dpuf

    YOU HAVE BEEN WARNED!!!!!! No dangerous THOUGHTS.

    Like

  35. Hants January 2, 2016 at 10:22 AM #

    Not a dangerous thought but does this make sense?

    “BRIDGETOWN TEEMED WITH passengers from five cruise ships docked at the Bridgetown Port yesterday, but the visitors could only window shop on their one-day trip.”

    Like

  36. David January 2, 2016 at 10:24 AM #

    @Hants

    There is something in the minds of local politicians they can control people. It is up to our intelligent population to engage in our governance framework to derive the optimum result.

    Like

  37. Hants January 2, 2016 at 10:57 AM #

    @ David local politicians cannot be so stupid. Bob Marley sang ” a hungry man is an angry man”.

    Well so is a “thirsty man who can’t get water to bathe”.

    It is callous indifference to the people suffering from this water problem.

    Those community tanks should be replenished every day.

    Any water shortage and community tanks where the rich white people live ?

    Like

  38. LOOK January 2, 2016 at 3:22 PM #

    Barbados, no change STILL, still so very ill. The DLP is doing nothing still to salvage the country. The BLP at the helm won’t do better.

    Like

  39. Simple Simon January 2, 2016 at 4:24 PM #

    Dear David:

    Who appointed Donville as Chief Thought thought Policeman?

    Stupseee!!!!!!

    Like

  40. Simple Simon January 2, 2016 at 4:26 PM #

    @Hants January 2, 2016 at 10:57 AM “Any water shortage and community tanks where the rich white people live?”

    Nope.

    Like

  41. David January 2, 2016 at 4:34 PM #

    @Simple Simon

    This is his brand and it continues to serve him well.

    Like

  42. Vincent Haynes January 2, 2016 at 4:51 PM #

    Hants and SS…..it looks like not only rich white people are having water according to the below post
    …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

    Colonel Buggy December 31, 2015 at 7:26 PM #

    What makes a good life is knowing that when others are scratching their royal ar***,some of us are able to rock back sipping champagne, or in the case of St Joseph, nice clean water.
    The Better Securities Act of Barbados was established in 1920. In essence the Act provides that residents of exclusive areas such as Strathclyde, Belleville ,Navy Gardens ,Rockley etc, were guaranteed an interrupted supply of Water ,Gas and Electricity, outside of maintenance, a hurricane or a breakdown.Workers of these Utilities were barred from going on strike .
    Today the Better Securites Act is still in operation, not from a legal point of view, but more from an equestrian one. Like a horse walking in circles with a leash attached, it will continue to walk in a circle even after the leash has been removed.
    The following diagram is self explanatory. It shows how privilege people, including the GOCB have been given preferential treatment of the supply of water over the suffering rank and file people of St Joseph, whose Taxes helped to financed this same water rerouting project. How many more days before we become a republic?

    Like

  43. Colonel Buggy January 2, 2016 at 5:05 PM #

    Hants January 2, 2016 at 10:57 AM #

    Any water shortage and community tanks where the rich white people live ?
    ………………………………………………………………………………………
    Not in Cattlewash, Nor Andrews Round Hill (see diagrams previously posted) and certainly not at Easy Hall , where it is rumored that Easy Hall Great House is now owned by a Lashley.

    Like

  44. greemule January 2, 2016 at 8:34 PM #

    The middle class are the house slaves on the slave plantation.

    Like

  45. David January 2, 2016 at 8:57 PM #

    The middle class appear to be shackled by ‘economic slavery ‘.

    Like

  46. Vincent Haynes January 2, 2016 at 9:16 PM #

    @David January 2, 2016 at 8:57 PM #

    When will you and others realise that humanoids are of one genetic construct and leave out the melanin rubbish which is being fostered by individuals possesed of what one can only describe as ignorance in the true sense of its meaning.

    Like

  47. Well Well & Consequences2 January 2, 2016 at 9:25 PM #

    To exhausted tonight to say what I feel about Inniss’ callous, insensitive attitude and those of his compadres who see nothing wrong with people suffering for water.

    Like

  48. NorthernObserver January 3, 2016 at 10:46 PM #

    This is one of the more useful threads I have ever seen on BU.

    “The middle class appear to be shackled by ‘economic slavery “….a potentially great definition of middle class.

    But you see we want it all and we want it now. Conflicting goals? If you keep spending more than you make monthly, relying upon credit, you can get all the show pieces, but the asset base suffers. The noose is firmly positioned, dependent upon cash flow. The day the cash flow slackens, shiite hits the fan.

    Like

  49. Hants January 4, 2016 at 12:47 AM #

    More entertainment for the Middle class and more “profits” to Trinis.

    “MORE GOOD NEWS is coming for the Barbados economy. Trinidad-based investor Prestige Holdings Limited is on the verge of constructing a $30 million cinema complex at Welches, St Thomas.”

    Like

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