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If Barbados was a Bajan – Part II

Submitted by King Ja Ja

bimBut if Barbados was a Bajan, it would explain a lot about the state of our national psyche. When approaching 50 years, a Bajan man or woman might reflect on his or her life […]

and think about how little time is left to make his or her mark.

If Barbados was a Bajan, she might recall how meek and naïve that first 10 years of her life was by 1976. Running and playing, her colonial-born parents lovingly shielded her from worry while trying to establish a legacy. When she stumbled, someone picked her up and dusted her off, but her scraped knees betrayed her adventurousness. She was unconsciously being nurtured to take the biggest exam of her life, the 11+. In fact, it might have seemed like the most important thing that she would ever do and when she was kicked up the ladder to secondary school, life would just be made easier because the hardest transition was finally over.

She was still unaware of the futility of the exercise and that her changing body would create the most difficult transition in life – looking in the mirror and daily transforming the image staring back at her into a picture of beauty and confidence – of acceptance and resilience (Am I too black? Am I too white? Am I beautiful? Is my hair too kinky? Is it too straight?). The already set exam in the midst of oil crises which would be one of the first global tests of Barbados’ economic resilience showing her vulnerability, but resilience. She added. Subtracted. Wrote a little something. She did not have to analyse, plan or problem solve for the future. But she triumphed (well in the eyes of her colonial parents) – maybe was even in the top 10 (no one can remember now – it was so long ago).

Everyone put her on a pedestal and believed she could succeed. She believed it herself, and a consciousness started to develop. She eventually grew out of her awkwardness and started to explore her identity in new ways and make the most of her education. Maybe she could become anything…

If Barbados was a Bajan at twenty, you could say he was bold – maybe even a bit cocky. But maybe even a heady mix between idealistic and confused. There was a lot of wealth around him – but he resisted trying to ‘roll’ with others who had come up with obvious advantages because of who they were and what they had. The advantaged ones. They stood tall – their shadows cast far behind them stretching deep into the past – so far and so long you could not even tell where their heads separated from their bodies. It was hard to excel in their shadows. They had cars, grand properties, business interests. He had none. He went off to university to get that paper – to do what his parents said he should do, maybe not quite what he wanted to do – but at this point who knew what that was? It had been drilled in him to succeed – to become something…

By the late 1990s, he was something – he had cars, grand properties and business interests. He had secured his own advantages for his children and pretty, intelligent wife – who had reconciled some sort of hybridized balance between acceptance and confidence but who was so exhausted striving to be everything…

He wanted more. Those with inherited advantages just kept moving beyond him. He was already leveraged to the hilt. That last overseas degree was expensive. The way too big house on the hill was expensive. The Mercedes put him in the hole. But still more was desired, but how? How could he get there? How could he finally get power over the advantaged ones? It was settled. He could run for power.

The next 10 years was spent accumulating – revolving credit – not only of his household, but the country’s economy. He was getting there. But where was ‘there’? Would he know it when he reached? Probably not. He didn’t care. The advantaged ones sought the trail of his desperation and the power he thought he had was just reversed. He soon was following their trail as they threw him crumbs, instead of helping eachother to read the map. He got to the top, and there was another mountain to go – and not only one mountain, but several – the IMF, World Bank, United Nations, the US, CARICOM, IDB – and #omg China was the mammoth on the horizon.

Beleaguered, he retreated to the comfort of his home on the hill he could not afford, with teenagers siphoning his pocket and draining his energy with their constant complaints and castigations of perceived deprivation. Exhaustion had overwhelmed his pretty wife in her high-powered job trying to keep up with the excesses of children, life and work. She was not happy with anything.

But where else could he escape to? Remember — Behind the hills were mountains. But then he thought, maybe he could dig a small cave in the foothills of those mountains – maybe even in a den called Miami. No one would know. He could fly there and stash away a little happiness for himself and if there was some left over after the flashy SUV rentals, condos and stripbars, he might consider leaving it for his ungrateful children – but probably not his wife.

By 2010, the mountains eroded, greed was excavated and exposed, unpaid bills were landfilled there. Concrete edifices littered the landscape. The sewage sloshed beneath them. The advantaged ones did not care. They could import water for themselves and their foreign guests while everyone else pumped out and consumed their own impurity. The debt mounted. The cave just kept receding into nothingness. He would just get lost trying to find his way out.

If Barbados was a Bajan at 49, he would remember a life of promise – of hard work spent taking exams – of being tested. He would ask himself, is this what a mid-life crisis is? He already had the women and the cars. He would reflect on the fact that nothing in this land is actually his. It belongs to banks, Trinidad and the advantaged ones.

His big empty obzocky house on the hill looks unfinished with the cracks in the foundation starting to show. His wife has a perpetual smile for everyone else outside, but a turned down frown for him inside. The children don’t complain anymore. They don’t speak. They like silence. They spend their days plugging into social media when someone should just take the plug out. They are studying away. They will probably live there. They have graduated to sending their expenses by Whatsapp and he opens the mobile banking app to transfer money from his soaring credit line to them. He doesn’t even tell them that he did. He does not expect a thank you.

At forty-nine years, Barbados is at a crossroads – can it emerge from this mountain of debt while trying to salvage its future? If Barbados was a Bajan, he can’t remember making his contributions to the NIS. He can’t remember all of the concessions that he gave away or how much they amounted to. Was that even investment? Or was it a clever robbery? He can’t remember. What is he going to do? Is there a future to invest in now? Who will take care of him when he starts to leak everywhere – when he forgets his name – when he can no longer find his home?

These are the questions we have to face as we approach the beginning of 50 years of Independence next year. If Barbados was a Bajan like you, what would you want for your future and how could you build on your achievements while translating the hard lessons of the past into prosperity not only for yourself, but also for all of Barbados in the future. But, on the other hand, you might also ask yourself, will I just stand still and continue to do nothing?…

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70 Comments on “If Barbados was a Bajan – Part II”

  1. Vincent Haynes December 5, 2015 at 9:53 AM #

    This is where we are at today………

    http://www.barbadostoday.bb/2015/12/04/this-is-not-about-maria-agard/

    …….and this is our tomorrow

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p036hn46#play

    We could however change course with this.

    http://thisisafrica.me/tanzanias-presay-festivities/

    Like

  2. Vincent Haynes December 5, 2015 at 10:03 AM #

    David

    a post and a repost have vanished….just post 1 if you find them.

    Like

  3. Well Well & Consequences December 5, 2015 at 4:50 PM #

    Vincent….one by one African countries are realizing it’s easier to do the right things. Are Caribbean leaders capable of that leap.

    Like

  4. Vincent Haynes December 5, 2015 at 6:47 PM #

    WW&C…..Good question…..what is missing is the desire of the sheeple to change the status quo…….the fete-ing concept has taken over…….we like it so.

    African continent maybe awakening but the Caribbean is still making sport,when it should have been the other way around,if only we were wise enough to have discarded the notion of mother Africa and father Europe and blazed our own path as a new entity……ah well.

    Instead we are deciding who is god,where humanoids come from and the principles of politics……….chuckle…..we like it so

    Like

  5. Well Well & Consequences December 6, 2015 at 5:05 AM #

    You are right Vincent….given Caribbean people should be leading in the changes we are seeing in Africa, forcing politicians to make that leap, but how can it when there are so many idiots/sheeple out there, like some on here, telling politicians they too great and prim and proper, they prefer politicians like Mia who would smoke weed with them, among other things and Lashley who would wuk up with, the lower class mentality at play.

    If the population cannot think above the basest most unimportant things in life, it’s doomed to continue as is, it’s very shameful. The taxpayers spent so many billions over the decades educating the population, now we see the end result, a marijuana smoking, wuk up populace, aided by politicians.

    Like

  6. Donna December 6, 2015 at 6:06 AM #

    Well Well.

    You forgot the drunk up, shoot up, stab up and litter up. Long live the INDEPENDENCE CARNIVAL!

    Like

  7. Donna December 6, 2015 at 6:09 AM #

    Well Well,

    It is much much easier to do the right thing but nobody has actually considered that! Somehow people have been deceived into thinking that you have to be crooked to progress. When I think on these things Satan doesn’t seem such a ridiculous idea after all

    Like

  8. Vincent Haynes December 6, 2015 at 6:10 AM #

    @Well Well & Consequences December 6, 2015 at 5:05 AM #

    Chuckle……this world is in serious problems then as more than half of our world leaders have smoked/ingested mind altering substances and this was ever so.

    No,the inertia comes from us not knowing who we are as a people,where we want to go and by what means will we get to our destination.

    We are a new entity,young to this world and will in time arrive.

    Like

  9. Donna December 6, 2015 at 6:12 AM #

    Having said that I shall now get off BU and go and put first things first. It pays of in the end. Early to bed, early to rise, a stitch in time saves nine and all that. These things work. What the old people used to call common sense now in short supply.

    Like

  10. Well Well & Consequences December 6, 2015 at 6:51 AM #

    Donna, exactly,……no one sees anything wrong, at least not sane people, with politicians using/selling drugs with the populace using the status and position given them by the people to use both sexes as their personal harem, use taxpayers money to accumulate and maintain yardfowls, etc…it’s all gone to hell and in their delirium, there is nothing wrong with that….hmmm.

    Vincent…..Which one of those small minded, retaliation seeking, egotistical idiots you know would even want to take the first step toward arrival….certainly not modern day politicians, nor enough of a majority population to DEMAND that change toward arrival.

    Like

  11. David December 6, 2015 at 6:53 AM #

    In the post Independence era many of us who want to see Barbados sustain progress as a small island on a competitive world stage will quote Barrow’s mirror image speech. Shouldn’t we be quoiting others by now?

    Like

  12. Bush Tea December 6, 2015 at 7:30 AM #

    @ Vincent
    Skippa, if you don’t know what to say ..why not just hush? you keep minding Dee Ingrunt Word and talking a lotta lukewarm shiite…! He up in Canada with his tail freezing …what is your excuse..?

    First you said that we are failing to change the status quo…” ..and blazed our own path as a new entity……ah well.
    Instead we are deciding who is god,where humanoids come from and the principles of politics……….chuckle…..we like it so”
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    …12 hours later (after the hangover??) you now say…
    “No,the inertia comes from us not knowing who we are as a people,where we want to go and by what means will we get to our destination.”
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Now you realise that our failure to change the status quo comes from NOT knowing who we are…?

    Ahhmm!! don’t we need to figure out WHO we are, and WHERE we are going, and HOW we should get there, by understanding WHY we are here; and WHAT is the purpose; and WHAT is the way to achieve that purpose?

    Listen bro…. either stop listening to Dee Ingrunt Word (who often live up to his name) or cut back on that Saturday night drinking thing….🙂

    Like

  13. ac December 6, 2015 at 7:39 AM #

    If EWB was alive today He probably would take one look at the Barbadian image and think “What de hell have they done with all this FREE EDUCATION ? and shake his F..ing Head

    Like

  14. Vincent Haynes December 6, 2015 at 7:40 AM #

    @David December 6, 2015 at 6:53 AM #

    You want change…..to what

    You want quothes from others…..from who

    We have not evolved from the independence rethoric as yet,which is why todays politicos can only refer to the past in their speeches as none has been able to contribute to the present far less the future.

    We are stagnating as a country and continue to do the same old stuff……which is why this blog is important for the next step in Bims journey………individuals can argue,cuss,swap ideas that will eventually coalesce into a cohesive plan to move forward with…….dont ask me how long it will take.

    Like

  15. Vincent Haynes December 6, 2015 at 7:44 AM #

    @Bush Tea December 6, 2015 at 7:30 AM #

    Chuckle……Use of English………Eng.Lit……I wonder if you ever stop jibbering long enough to understand what is being written.

    Like

  16. David December 6, 2015 at 7:48 AM #

    @Vincent

    Agree with you. It starts with leadership. The fact we have been trapped in a state of inertia means there is a vacuum of leadership in the country. Political yardfowls will never admit it but Barbados has lost its way, who can deny. A glance across the landscape of Barbados conforms we will remain trapped for some time to come.

    Like

  17. Well Well & Consequences December 6, 2015 at 7:55 AM #

    I am sure EWB would be wondering how the hell so many yardfowls came into existence and acknowledge that he could take some blame. Then he would say, I told ya’ll you will wake up one morning and don’t own the island anymore, maybe only the clothes on your back…..hmmmm!

    Like

  18. Bush Tea December 6, 2015 at 8:13 AM #

    @ Vincent
    What is to understand about brass bowlery?
    …and what Eng Lit what…?
    Wuh you understand the ‘Prologue to Canterbury tales’ yet?
    …well not stinking Bushie…🙂

    Like

  19. Vincent Haynes December 6, 2015 at 8:26 AM #

    @Bush Tea December 6, 2015 at 8:13 AM #

    Chuckle…..Alas,poor Bushy……..yup,comprehension can be a beach.

    Anyhow guh long to the devil images,you may recognise something ovah dey dat u cud comprehend…..lol

    Like

  20. ac December 6, 2015 at 8:45 AM #

    The question “like” the elephant in room Where has all this FREE education taken us or done for society in the development of the country?
    What most would perceived is that Barbados has not used education as a leverage to build a nation that has all the influence and bedrock of bajan ideas
    The fact remains that although barbados has come a long way making necessary and important strides towards development the coveted prize of ownership still remains elusive and outside the bounds of reach as society and govts steadfastly hold on to safety through the knoweldge of outside influence with a girded reluctance of removing the mask from the eyes and shackles off the feet

    Like

  21. David December 6, 2015 at 5:35 PM #

    A decent rendition of the Barbados National anthem, dont know if the head of Protocol would agree though.

    Like

  22. ac December 6, 2015 at 6:31 PM #

    Bravo ..Applause two thumbs up like a very good mixing of vocal harmony cappella style

    Like

  23. Hants December 7, 2015 at 3:34 PM #

    Sounds familiar ? just change a few names and the country of origin.

    Like

  24. Hants December 8, 2015 at 12:23 AM #

    Banks….Ah thanks!!!!….and you will NOT be in my fridge this christmas.

    ” He acknowledged that Banks DIH Guyana Limited sold the more than 6.5 million BHL shares it owned to AmBev last week in a trade worth more than $42 million on the Barbados Stock Exchange. The stock was sold at $7.10 per share.

    http://www.nationnews.com/nationnews/news/75335/bhl-gone#sthash.PCbBdhlC.dpuf

    Like

  25. Artaxerxes December 8, 2015 at 9:16 PM #

    I find it interesting and surprising that BU has not focused on the issue of doctors protesting against them having to obtain tax clearance certificates from the Barbados Revenue Authority (BRA).

    It was reported in the Sunday, December 6, 2015 edition of the Sunday Sun “that the Barbados Association of Medical Practitioners (BAMP) has instructed its membership not to apply for tax clearance certificates pending further communication from the organization.”

    Today’s edition of the Daily Nation also carried a news item which quoted MoF Sinckler as suggesting he was “not backing down from his position that professionals, including doctors and lawyers, must pay their taxes just as all other workers in the country.”

    “There are people who carry on businesses, who carry on practices and believe that they should invite all members of the public, as well they ought to, to utilize their services, whether it’s consultancy, whether it’s in medicine, whether it is law, whether it is engineering or whatever. Utilize their services, pay them out of the salaries of that have already been taxed……. but they don’t want to pay what is due to the government.”

    I have to agree with Sinckler on this issue, because there are many professionals in Barbados who do not file income or corporation taxes. Yet these individuals have benefited and continue to benefit from government’s social services. They expect their children to attend government nursery, primary and secondary schools, travel free on the Transport Board buses, and utilize the facilities of the public library, hospital and polyclinics.

    These DISHONEST INDIVIDUALS believe it is their RIGHT to “ride on the backs” of those individuals who honour their statutory obligations.

    Ironically, for many years owners of public service vehicles, such as hired cars, mini buses and all categories of taxis, are required to obtain tax clearance certificates from the BRA and NIS clearances from the National Insurance Office before they can pay the road taxes of their vehicles. Before these certificates are issued, owners have to file income tax returns and pay NI contributions. So what make doctors so special that they don’t think they should apply for clearances?

    However, to be fair, if Sinckler and the BRA are going after delinquent tax payers, they must also include freighters; shop and mini mart proprietors; car salesmen; artisans; and all categories of vendors, providers of maintenance services and care givers, just to list a few.

    Like

  26. Hants December 8, 2015 at 9:28 PM #

    On another note………BAJANS INVOLVED IN VINCY POLITICS.

    ” Supported” “by chairman of the Caribbean Pan African Network David Comissiong, who confessed he was born in St Vincent, and Editor Emeritus of the Nation Publishing Company, Harold Hoyte, Gonsalves begged Vincentians to go out and vote as his party and he seek a fourth term in office”

    http://www.nationnews.com/nationnews/news/75354/ulp-supporters-enjoy-final-rally#sthash.wDLvlCap.dpuf

    Like

  27. Hants December 8, 2015 at 9:30 PM #

    @ David you won’t be able to keep up with all the hot topics. lol

    Like

  28. David December 8, 2015 at 9:33 PM #

    @Hants

    It is December and you know the BU household slows a little at this time of the year.

    Like

  29. Hants December 8, 2015 at 9:49 PM #

    No problem David.

    We regulars will just insert New topics as necessary while trying to remain on point.

    Like

  30. Hants December 8, 2015 at 9:51 PM #

    @ David I hope the BU household is not busy trying to solve the problem of “rising sea levels” ? lol

    Like

  31. Artaxerxes December 8, 2015 at 11:16 PM #

    Hants December 8, 2015 at 9:28 PM #

    “On another note………BAJANS INVOLVED IN VINCY POLITICS.”

    Ralph also brought in Jamaicans to help fight his cause.

    Hants, many of my Vincentian friends living in Barbados and St. Vincent have been expressing mixed views about tomorrow’s elections. However, majority of them have “exhausted” their tolerance of Ralph Gonsalves and the ULP and are preparing to vote for Arnhim Eustace’s NDP.

    There is a mood of change in SVG and this is evidenced by the massive crowds that are attending NDP meetings. My friends shared with me, via social media, photos of NDP mass meetings held during the past week. On December 3, the NDP’s meeting held at Sion Hill attracted a massive crowd of supporters and went on to after 3:30 am. Last Wednesday, the party hosted another massive crowd at their Victoria Park meeting. If I was to form an opinion based on crowd attendance and the amount of people who are “pushing” the NDP and for “change”, I would have to predict a victory for Eustace.

    Peter Wickham and CADRES conducted a political opinion poll in October 2015, the results of which, at the time, the client did not want to make public. Wickham the political reality is that the polls are indicating it will be a tight election. One reason may be the fact that the ULP is seeking a fourth term in office. The other reality is the opposition has been fighting to win the government for 3 terms, while this will be Eustace’s fourth attempt to become prime minister. However, Gonsalves popularity exceeds that of Eustace, which is a common feature of St. Vincent’s polls.

    Like

  32. balance December 9, 2015 at 5:32 AM #

    “So what make doctors so special that they don’t think they should apply for clearances?”

    And attorneys-at- law too especially those who withhold funds due to clients. Yes I agree with Mr Sinckler in this instance but he must leave out the political grandstanding and introduce well thought out legislation which would also cover those whom you identified.

    Like

  33. balance December 9, 2015 at 5:51 AM #

    Arta my sources in St Vincent have reported that the meetings of both parties have been attracting massive crowds with the usual entertainment packages attached and the results will be close. Vincentians are between a rock and a hard place. They seem to have been turned off by the autocratic style of leadership practised by Mr Gonsalves; a trait which has even exceeded that of former Prime Minister Sir James Mitchell and would like to change but are mindful of his progressive policies which they find hard to ignore. By the way a LIAT aircraft and a private jet landed at the Argylle international Airport yesterday ; which is Mr Gonsalves signature project during his term in office. Remember for the past twelve years, Mr Eustace has campaigned vehemently against the construction of the airport going so far as to bring in an aviation expert who predicted that no planes would be able to land at the airport due to a cross wind. Mr Gonsalves role in this infrastructural development constructed as he put it by a coalition of the willing cannot be easily overlooked.

    Like

  34. David December 9, 2015 at 6:14 AM #

    Nobody from Barbados and the Caribbean driven to nominate a boy, or girl from the region? What does it all mean?

    http://www.globalteacherprize.org/announcing-the-2016-global-teacher-prize-top-50-finalists

    Like

  35. Artaxerxes December 9, 2015 at 7:41 AM #

    @ Balance

    St. Vincent is my favourite Caribbean islands (after Barbados, of course). I feel at home when I visit there and have accumulated a number of friends over the years.

    Vincentians have mixed views about the Argyle International Airport. Many have problems with the estimated cost of constructing the AIA, which progressively increased from EC$480.6M in 2005 to EC$589M in 2007, and EC$700M in 2008.

    The airport was first scheduled to be completed and opened in 2011, but was not, and has missed completion deadline annually since then. During the Budget Speech in January 2014, Gonsalves said the airport was on target for completion by the end of 2014. The scheduled opening was revised to mid 2015, then to the end of 2015. We are now hearing AIA is scheduled to be completed and ready for operation within the first quarter of 2016.

    On Thursday, November 19, 2015, the Eastern Caribbean Civil Aviation Authority (ECCAA) conducted a testing of the runway approach or Precision Approach Path Indicator (PAPI) Lights. The purpose of these lights is to ensure the safe landing of aircraft at the AIA. It was during this test that four small aircraft landed on the runway for the first time.

    Like

  36. balance December 9, 2015 at 8:10 AM #

    Artaxerxes December 9, 2015 at 7:41 AM #

    @ Balance

    St. Vincent is my favourite Caribbean islands (after Barbados, of course). I feel at home when I visit there and have accumulated a number of friends over the years.”

    The same with me. I am aware of the politics from both sides surrounding the construction of the airport and even though I feel that the project is a worthwhile one; I sometimes wonder if it can generate sufficient international traffic to sustain it.

    Like

  37. David December 9, 2015 at 8:59 AM #

    The airport doesn’t have to generate traffic, Ralphie will do what the other islands have done, add taxes!

    Like

  38. Artaxerxes December 9, 2015 at 11:17 PM #

    @ balance

    To my surprise, Ralph Gonsalves’ ULP has regained the government in St. Vincent & the Grenadines. However, the status quo remains the same, with the ULP gaining 8 seats and the NDP 7.

    Like

  39. Artaxerxes December 9, 2015 at 11:31 PM #

    The ULP won North Windward, North Central Windward, South Central Windward, South Windward, Mariaqua, West St. George, East St. George and Central Leeward.

    The NDP won North Leeward and South Leeward on the mainland and the Grenadines.

    I wonder what the Peter Wickham critics will have to say after these results. Although he said the election will be close, his poll predicted a win for Gonsalves.

    Like

  40. Artaxerxes December 9, 2015 at 11:49 PM #

    I forgot to include that the NDP all 3 seats in Kingstown (West Kingstown, Central Kingstown and East Kingstown).

    Like

  41. balance December 10, 2015 at 5:12 AM #

    “David December 9, 2015 at 8:59 AM #

    The airport doesn’t have to generate traffic, Ralphie will do what the other islands have done, add taxes!”

    Taxes on tickets are not enough to support maintenance of infrastructure and the administrative work needed to keep an airport functioning to international standards. They need adequate revenue from landing fees.

    Like

  42. balance December 10, 2015 at 5:21 AM #

    Arta I recognized your leaning towards the NDP and I suspect because you too like me harbours a dislike for Mr Gonsalves’ contemptuous form of governance but I cannot denyb that he did implement projects which were attractive and people centred. I know Mr Eustace and Jennifer well from the time he was attached to the Caribbean Development Bank here but he is a kind of Clyde Mascoll politician. Dour and unable to command attention. He retains his seat because its a stronghold and many of the voters are affluent and do not depend on largesse like those in the Leeward and Windward country areas.

    Like

  43. ac December 10, 2015 at 6:19 AM #

    Peter played the call with caution used the * out* or just in case strategy “close call” nothing hard or meaningful just an easy way out. Gonsalves have many critics but he is well like and highly respected in the country (key word RESPECT)
    The election win was not so much about the economy as the people had predicted but Respect for the Man and his cabinet
    Don /t be fool the citizens came to the reality that the struggles of the country are not solely internal but aspects attached to external problems within the international markets which exacerbates and compounds the country social and economic problems and Gonsalves has/ or doing the best he can for the country
    What transpired was Respect for Gonsalves that beat economical problems
    A similar advantage for the DLP and a disadvantage that lurks under the wings of the Blp when going into the next election as the Mia becomes weaker by her mishandling of in house struggles and lack of respect shown towards her by the populace transforming or giving more Respect to PM Stuart

    Like

  44. Artaxerxes December 10, 2015 at 6:54 AM #

    @ Balance

    If the NDP was led by someone other than Arnhim Eustace, I would have preferred that party to win, rather than the ULP. I agree with your assessment of Eustace that he is a “Clyde Mascoll type of politician,” people listen to him in his role as an economist, but seem not to take him too seriously as a politician.

    This maybe the result of the fact that we in the Caribbean have become accustomed to and readily embrace political leaders who are “forceful” or “political bullies.” Perhaps Eustace does not possess the type of “political finesse” that would make his characteristics resonate with the wider Vincentian populace.

    Eustace was PM for approximately five months (from October 2000 to March 2001) and subsequently lost the 2001 general elections. He suffered losses in 2005, 2010 and now in 2015 elections.

    Eustace has suffered 4 consecutive losses and now at age 71, he could make task of the NDP looking for a new leader much easier by doing the honourable thing by resigning, thereby making way for a younger leader with new ideas.

    However, many of my friends are upset and obviously crying “foul,” implying Ralph rigged the elections. I would get a better sense of what transpired “on the ground” when I visit St. Vincent, probably at month-end.

    Like

  45. David December 10, 2015 at 6:59 AM #

    The point is that taxes will play a significant part in the ticket to St Vincent like in the other territories. Existing traffic will be diverted, they will obviously be able to accommodate bigger aircraft. Any shortfall in revenue will have to be subsidized by government. What choice does the country have now saddled with such a big debt.

    Like

  46. Artaxerxes December 10, 2015 at 7:16 AM #

    @ Balance

    “He retains his seat because its a stronghold and many of the voters are affluent and do not depend on largesse like those in the Leeward and Windward country areas.”

    Are your above comments specific to the mentioned constituencies?

    The NDP won the entire Kingstown area (West, Central and East) where many of the voters are less affluent.

    @ ac

    I have warned you about making comments relative to issues you do not have any knowledge of, because you tend to, in your words, “explicitly demonstrate” your ignorance. Your speculative comments on the St. Vincent elections are no different.

    You accuse me of trying to curtail your freedom of expression; I was trying to save you from embarrassing yourself.

    Like

  47. balance December 10, 2015 at 7:57 AM #

    “Artaxerxes December 10, 2015 at 7:16 AM #

    @ Balance

    “He retains his seat because its a stronghold and many of the voters are affluent and do not depend on largesse like those in the Leeward and Windward country areas.”

    Are your above comments specific to the mentioned constituencies?

    The NDP won the entire Kingstown area (West, Central and East) where many of the voters are less affluent.”

    Yes, i am speaking of those constituencies which have been traditionally NDP strongholds but buttressed with the affluent vote. It is instructive that except for Mr St Clair Leacock in Central who increased his vote significantly; Mr Eustace votes decreased significantly In the West and the votes of Mr Cummings in the East decreased as well albeit slightly.

    Like

  48. balance December 10, 2015 at 8:03 AM #

    “David December 10, 2015 at 6:59 AM #

    The point is that taxes will play a significant part in the ticket to St Vincent like in the other territories. Existing traffic will be diverted, they will obviously be able to accommodate bigger aircraft. Any shortfall in revenue will have to be subsidized by government. What choice does the country have now saddled with such a big debt.”

    Have it your way my friend. Obviously you have never been exposed to the inner workings of an international airport. Caribbean airports labelled international barely have enough traffic to make ends meet. Hence the iniquitous taxes on tickets to make up the shortfall. Take our airport for instance. Mainly busy between 11am and six pm.

    Like

  49. Bush Tea December 10, 2015 at 8:07 AM #

    balance
    You and David saying the same thing…
    It ALREADY balanced skippa
    Cool it.

    Like

  50. Artaxerxes December 10, 2015 at 9:57 AM #

    balance December 10, 2015 at 7:57 AM #

    “It is instructive that except for Mr St Clair Leacock in Central who increased his vote significantly; Mr Eustace votes decreased significantly In the West and the votes of Mr Cummings in the East decreased as well albeit slightly.”

    Your above comments are true, but what is interesting is the fact that both parties have been able to maintain the same level of support for three consecutive elections and winning the same seats as they did in the 2010 elections.

    Like

  51. ac December 10, 2015 at 10:16 AM #

    Sorry but the expected St. Vincent results that the blp had hope as a definite clearance to boast on the predicated policies of Doom and gloom securing a safety net and life line for a victory in the next election ( for themselves) has fizzled.
    The next question along with all the in house bittering in the blp that must be address is a reformation of good leadership borne out of Respect which will become principled and a main focus going into the next election
    The “economy stupid” which was the mantra and directive for economies have been replaced with a dignified policies as exemplified by Obama victories and now Gonzalves.
    The truth of the matter maybe that old wheel of indifference has been removed and in its place a policy which merits the need of the populace to have a country that represents themselves with a noticeable merit of statemanship and diplomacy

    Like

  52. David December 10, 2015 at 10:29 AM #

    @Bush Tea

    Balance has clothes hanging and we know it.

    @Artax

    How can Wickham be give credit for calling the election that has an unprecedented close finish? Unless you have been misunderstood.

    Like

  53. Artaxerxes December 10, 2015 at 11:19 AM #

    David December 10, 2015 at 10:29 AM #

    “@Artax: How can Wickham be give credit for calling the election that has an unprecedented close finish? Unless you have been misunderstood.”

    Perhaps you may have misunderstood my comments.

    First, we must take into consideration that the ULP commissioned CADRES to conduct an opinion poll, which, according to the ULP general secretary, Julian Francis: “the ULP has been in “constant polling”, adding that CADRES conducts all of the party’s polls.”

    In an article in the October 22, 2015 edition of the “I-Witness News (iWN), Peter Wickham said the elections will be tight because the government is seeking a fourth consecutive term.

    Wickham admitted that his client did not want the results of the poll released to the public and Francis told IWN that the poll was for “internal consumption.”

    Against this background, Wickham would have to phrase his answers to journalists in a manner so as not to breach the confidentiality of his client, but “camouflage” his responses to imply which party he think would win.

    Examine Wickham’s responses as follows:

    “You are looking at a government that is now facing a fourth term. The other reality is you have an opposition that has been fighting to win government for three terms, and essentially, you are looking at an opposition leader (where) this will be his fourth try at becoming prime minister.”

    “I can tell you the popularity of the current prime minister exceeds the popularity of the current leader of the opposition, which is a common feature of polls in St. Vincent & the Grenadines.”

    Wickham admitted that there was definitely a “mood for change” in St. Vincent, but questioned if it was something people were going to vote for. Based on his experience in the region, he suggested that people may not vote for change because they like the government more, or they may not vote for change because they like the opposition less.

    Like

  54. Artaxerxes December 10, 2015 at 11:46 AM #

    @ AC

    Once again, I shall warn you about commenting on issue you do not have any knowledge of. You are basing your comments on the Vincentian election results through “DLP eyes.”

    Firstly, the politics practiced in St. Vincent and Barbados is different. Secondly, you cannot seriously compare the leadership styles of Ralph Gonsalves with that of Fruendel Stuart.

    Gonsalves is seen as a “people’s man.” He is always finds the time to be among Vincentians and addresses the nation on various issues. Ralph takes the initiative, has been at the forefront of intervening on many issues affecting the Caribbean, even those that do not affect St. Vincent, whether it is cricket, regional integration, LIAT or immigration issues.

    Stuart, on the other hand, always confines himself among the party faithful where he feels more comfortable. He does not see it fit to address all Barbadians, but prefers to speak or comment on issues within the confines of a “DLP environment”, such constituency branch meetings, DLP annual conferences and DLP organizations within the Diaspora.

    Perhaps you could enlighten me as to what have Stuart been able to achieve as head of CARICOM, other than his belated response to Dominica after the hurricane and against the background that leaders of the other Caribbean islands responded almost immediately?

    Like

  55. ac December 10, 2015 at 12:20 PM #

    Artexeres keep burying your head. The end result is that people are looking for leadership that have a similarity that projects and protects the nation interest not selfinterest and not the politics of yardfowlism
    Your intent to get ac /s to remain quiet has fallen on deaf ears.try if u must it would never work against the backdrop of freedom of speech
    Bro ac is all prepared to meet you toe to toe until the next election

    Like

  56. balance December 10, 2015 at 12:37 PM #

    “David December 10, 2015 at 10:29 AM # @Bush Tea

    Balance has clothes hanging and we know it.”
    Wishing you and family a wonderful Xmas season and the best of health in the New Year.You can join me on xmas morning between the hours of 7am and 2pm in the little area leading on to Kirpalani Store next to the BTI building opposite St Mary’s church for an annual Xmas morning celebration of food, drink and music where wwe usually meet after mass.
    Once again seasons greetings to you and family.

    Like

  57. David December 10, 2015 at 1:00 PM #

    @Artax

    Understood!

    Like

  58. Vincent Haynes December 10, 2015 at 1:05 PM #

    @David December 10, 2015 at 1:00 PM #

    I was wondering if you had clothes hanging out as well,prior to this understanding.

    Like

  59. Artaxerxes December 10, 2015 at 2:13 PM #

    Your bravery far exceeds your good sense, ac.

    As Malik would sing:

    Ronald Jones, we education minister, he does talk fuh cup;
    L’il Caesar, Steve Blackett and Michael Lashely …. all ah dem fuh cup.
    Clare Cowan and CAHILL… two uh DEM fuh cup,
    Sinckler, Denis Lowe, Kelly, Darcy Boyce gine got Barbados fuh cup,
    And even we prime minister, Fruendel Stuart, I sure everybody gine agree,
    We aint got nuhbody in Bubaydus that more fuh cup than he.

    Uh want a ball.

    Esther Byer, Irene, Patrick Todd and George Hudson….. all uh dem GET fuh cup.
    Wuh Carrington do to he client Griffiths, dat did really fuh cup,
    How Leroy scam the CLICO policiy holders, dat did fuh cup,
    Mia Mottley and Jerome Walcott.… two uh dem fuh cup,
    We dun know wuh happen and we know it is true,
    Wuh de BLP do to Maria Agard, dat did also fuh cup, too.

    Uh want ah ball.

    Like

  60. Hants December 10, 2015 at 2:15 PM #

    Just after midday, the sources pointed out, there was already a massive crowd of NDP supporters clad in yellow shirts blocking the Sion Hill road overlooking the Arnos Vale Airport and an even larger frenzied gathering around the Layou Police Station in Central Leeward, where the recount was expected to occur”

    http://www.nationnews.com/nationnews/news/75425/eustace-claims-election-victory#sthash.p6Oit7Ob.dpuf

    Like

  61. Hants December 10, 2015 at 2:22 PM #

    @ Artaxerxes,

    Your lyrics fuh cup. Ask Gabby or RPB fuh help. lol

    Like

  62. Georgie Porgie December 10, 2015 at 3:10 PM #

    Hants December 10, 2015 at 2:22 PM #
    HOW YOU DESCRIBE DAT CRICKET AFTER LUNCH LAST NITE?

    Like

  63. ac December 10, 2015 at 3:59 PM #

    Do not worry abiut my bravery bravery is what it takes to lead and win battles . many sensible people are known to be cowards.
    You decided which of the two sides you rather be placed

    Like

  64. David December 10, 2015 at 4:11 PM #

    @Vincent

    As you know there is a little art attached to debating, some people take it way too personal.In a largely anonymous forum all the more ridiculous.

    On 10 December 2015 at 19:59, Barbados Underground wrote:

    >

    Like

  65. Artaxerxes December 11, 2015 at 8:23 AM #

    @ Hants

    Dem fellas is professionals, not me.

    Like

  66. Hants December 11, 2015 at 1:24 PM #

    BLACK LIVES MATTER

    “The road drop and now my home falling back; I don’t feel safe in there anymore. The water pipes bursting and the electric wires stretching. I want help!” she said

    http://www.nationnews.com/nationnews/news/75453/slipping-away#sthash.DCO4qWMO.dpuf

    Like

  67. David December 11, 2015 at 3:16 PM #

    Has anyone noticed the BWA has has to did up Roebuck Street again to fix pipes covered earlier?

    Like

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