Sports and Games

Akeela Jones, Barbados 'ONLY world class athlete.

Akeela Jones, Barbados’ ONLY world class athlete.

The decision to send a team to participate in the 2014 Commonwealth Games comprised of 104 athletes and officials has stuck in the BU throat like a fish bone. Barbados was represented in Athletics, Badminton, Boxing, Cycling Road, Cycling Track, Judo, Netball, Rugby Sevens, Shooting, Swimming, Table Tennis and Triathlon. Compared to Bahamas which sent 45 athletes to the same games reported to be the largest ever, a few questions need to be directed at decision makers of the national sports program in Barbados because we continue to make sport at sports. No need to mention that Jamaica sent a 114 member team to the same games.

BU appreciates that the Barbados Olympic Association (BOA) should not be involved in the management of the individual sports association but he who pays the piper calls the tune.  The fogies who administer sports in Barbados must have known there was no justification to send netball, badminton, rugby, shooting and a few other teams to the 2014 Commonwealth Games. Affected by scarce financial resources, the result of prolonged depressed economic economies in many Caribbean countries, isn’t there a reasonable expectation that judicious decisions must be seen to be made by our leaders? If the average Barbadian were to have been asked if any of the teams sent to the 2014 Commonwealth Games had a chance to achieve fourth position the answer would probably have been a resounding no! The track and field team was the only team to reach the finals in their events.

Would it not have made more sense to carve out a significant slice of the 2014 Commonwealth Games budget to give high level exposure to athletes in dire need of exposure, instead of unrealistically expecting them to move from B standard to A standard performance expecting gold, silver and bronze performances ? Here is what Neil Murrell, Acting Director of Sports at the National Sports Council had to say when he greeted the team on their return from Glasgow.

We know that the finances would not be what we had in the past and we would obviously have to look at selectively choosing the teams that we feel would give us a chance at a medal,” said Murrell. He noted that they were aware that the athletes needed exposure to a lot of high level competition in order to effectively compete at the standard of the Commonwealth Games.

BU was unforgiving last year in response to the bungling that resulted in the cancellation of NAPSAC and BSSAC last year.  We were also sceptical about Barbados’ ability to mobilize after the London Olympics to be ready for the Rio 2016 Olympics.  The unsupported optimism by chef de mission Cameron Burke of the BOA that the performance of the team at the 2014 Commonwealth was encouraging is bullshit to be frank. Burke has not done his credibility any good by couching his report about Barbados Commonwealth Games performance in diplomatic lingo.

We are about 711 days until the 2016 Olympics. What realistic expectations should Barbadians  have about the health of our national sports program to produce quality athletes. BU is steadfast to the view that a vibrant sports program is mandatory for a small country like Barbados especially with trending youth unemployment in high double digits.

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76 Comments on “Sports and Games”

  1. Bush Tea August 23, 2014 at 9:43 PM #

    @ David
    Perhaps we need to begin by asking these sports leaders what exactly their objectives are……
    It is altogether possible that there may be as many different concepts of what success looks like, as there are differing views.

    Obviously the current leaders must believe that they are doing a good job ….since we have been doing the SAME things years after year for decades now….and we hear of no plans for any serious change…

    What is it you would like to see? Barbados winning gold medals in six sports at Olympics? Perhaps it is all about participation and representation ….flying the national flag on the world stage etc
    ….and then of course …there are the trips….. :)

    Like

  2. David August 23, 2014 at 9:52 PM #

    @Bush Tea

    We need to have a national sports program that is gears to give hope to our youth.

    Like

  3. Life Changer + August 23, 2014 at 10:01 PM #

    @ David.
    If the Government can’t pay it’s bills,
    then the suggestion that without first world sponsors you suggest to your enlightend friend only reveals your lack of undertaking of that task.

    Mr Bolt, is far ahead with Puma…..

    Like

  4. Life Changer + August 23, 2014 at 10:10 PM #

    @ David.
    I believe that Barrack is owed some $70 million Barbados dollars for non performance on its debt.
    Skirting these facts, and the financial state of the economy here warrants an IMF intervention and a devalued $ here.
    Saying and doing are two different things to “spin”….,,

    Like

  5. Bush Tea August 23, 2014 at 10:37 PM #

    @. David
    We need to have a national sports program that is geared to give hope to our youth.
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    …but then wneed to have a National STRATEGIC plan that is geared to give hope to everyone…
    …seems that sport is just as messed up as everything else then….
    Why, exactly, are you expecting different…?

    Like

  6. David August 23, 2014 at 10:47 PM #

    @Bush Tea

    A society owes it to our young people to create avenues to pursue endevours of excellence. A society that ignores the youth will struggle. As adults we should live to create pathways to opportunities for our youth. Why follow traditional models, why can’t we – a little island – be different.

    Like

  7. Colonel Buggy August 23, 2014 at 11:43 PM #

    Bush Tea | August 23, 2014 at 10:37 PM |
    @. David
    We need to have a national sports program that is geared to give hope to our youth.
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    …but then we need to have a National STRATEGIC plan that is geared to give hope to everyone…
    …………………………………………………………………………………..
    “To Give Hope”
    As the Comedian Bill Murphy lamented
    ” Years ago we had Johny Cash, Bob Hope,and Steve Jobs. Now we have no cash, no hope and no jobs. Please Lord keep Kevin Bacon alive.

    Like

  8. robert ross August 24, 2014 at 4:25 AM #

    How wonderful that so many young people had a chance to compete – to take part. Why must the assumption be that it’s all about winning or losing? Still worse, about “excellence” – that poor overworked concept which can only ever mean ‘doing your best’? From little acorns…….And why would you implicitly denigrate them with your griping?. Do you want them all to grow up to be hate filled pricks like Pacha? Is that “excellence”?

    Like

  9. Life Changer + August 24, 2014 at 6:27 AM #

    “The Olympic Games were created for the exhaltation of the individual athlete.”

    A section from David King @ The BU in 2012 blog.
    ” The current reality which sees Barbados totally reliant on tourism in 2012 sums it up. On this note BU restates its support for Trevor Browne and Craig Archer who have taken on the Herculean task to oust the ensconced Steve Stoute and Erskine Simmons. And also call on Erskine ‘Boozer’ King, head of the national sports council, to step aside. With a new leadership in position at two of our critical sports authorities there is hope that a new dispensation will breed success.”
    ———— spin ——–…..

    THERE ARE NO AUDITIONS FOR ATHLETES.
    In reality ; It should be worth considering the number of people in a country “physically able to compete.” Many poorer African countries have high populations, but equally high incidents of poverty, hunger and disease. It is hardly fair to compare these countries with countries like Finland and Hungary which have a comparatively able population. Simply the lack of funding in many third world countries (owing to more pressing problems should also be considered.)
    The reality? For nearly every Olympic sport from curling to shot put to cycling, there is a hierarchy of levels, categories or competitive ranks that it takes years to climb and decades to achieve. There are no sports that, every four years, hang a sign on a parish cricket/soccer field: Olympic Trials Today, Everyone Welcome….

    Like

  10. ac August 24, 2014 at 7:06 AM #

    a lot of big words wrapped up in nationalism ..pride and the flag….but who is willing to pay for Vibrancy in barbados,,,,, i see another march heading down broad street when the natives are asked to pay….

    Like

  11. David August 24, 2014 at 7:42 AM #

    It is clear some of you do not read with comprehension. In the same way a government should utilize scarce resources in a manner to derive the greatest impact, the principle must apply to sports budget planners doing the same. Why send B standard performers to meets at the highest level that only serve to demoralize and destroy their confidence? Why send an army of administrators who are in it for the 5 star benefit? BU was at pains to compare the decision by Barbados sports administrators to send a 100+ team to Glasgow with Jamaica and Bahamas who have demonstrated in the last 20 years they are doing a good job building a healthy sports culture.

    Is it not interesting we give the politicians a pass and do not hold them to account on how they waste taxpayers resources, Green Land, Barrack etc. The thrust of this blog is about using our scarce resources in a smart way, demonstrate to the athletes a culture of excellence is expected!

    Like

  12. Hants August 24, 2014 at 8:18 AM #

    @David did you see that stupid move by Rosberg?

    Like

  13. ac August 24, 2014 at 8:22 AM #

    well apparently your sensitivity has gotten the best of your comprehension to relate that it is about cost,,not necessarily what is right or wrong,,,to be the very best calls for action..in dollars and cents,,not mere political poopycock to aim and fire recklessly .

    Like

  14. David August 24, 2014 at 8:22 AM #

    @Hants

    Like the commentators stated it was a 50 50 move but LH always seem to be holdings the wrong end.

    Like

  15. Bush Tea August 24, 2014 at 8:28 AM #

    @ David
    Don’t get all flustered :)
    Of course you are correct that resources need to be properly deployed…
    Bushie’s point is that in our present environment of general mediocrity and decline, what leads you to suggest that sport should be any different to….
    National Financial management
    Education
    Law and justice
    Law and order
    Culture
    Tourism
    Agriculture
    Waste disposal
    Taxation policy
    …or even GP, Dompey and ac?

    …the dog is dead David…..ALL of him……

    Like

  16. Hants August 24, 2014 at 8:34 AM #

    How can it be 50 50 when Hamilton had the racing line and a car length in front?

    The rest of the race will be interesting. Lets see if Lewis has enough car left to move up to a podium finish. Not looking good right now.

    Like

  17. David August 24, 2014 at 8:34 AM #

    @Bush Tea

    Maybe so but if we are going to have talking points to feed a national narrative this is one that must be bright on the radar.

    Like

  18. David August 24, 2014 at 8:36 AM #

    @Hants

    Ros made a legit move and tried to tuck in but was unsuccessful. He did no different to what Vettel did on L1.

    Like

  19. GEORGIE PORGIE August 24, 2014 at 8:38 AM #

    except that GP HAS EXCELLED FROM PRIMARY SCHOOL DAYS => HARRISONIAN=> ISLAND SCHOLAR=. QUALIFIED AS PHYSICIAN=> DEVELOPED NHS=> TEACHER OF MEDICAL STUDENTS ETC REAL ESTATE DEVELOPER

    GP HAS NOT DONE BADLY AT ALL IN HIS MEDIOCRITY… .

    Like

  20. ac August 24, 2014 at 8:43 AM #

    is it not interesting that most countries that have a well rounded sports programme has a full fledged support of private sectors involvement ,,only in barbados the govt and taxpayers are supposed to to do these great mammoth undertakings .it is also interesting to note that car racing does not seem to lack much financial support from the private sector,,, why not put more pressure on those groups who seems to have single out in the area of sports what is in their vested interest or commonality.

    Like

  21. ac August 24, 2014 at 8:44 AM #

    HA >>HA>> GP RIGHT ON THE BALL>>>>

    Like

  22. Hants August 24, 2014 at 8:48 AM #

    Jamaica has a homegrown sports program. Barbados should ask the Jamaicans for help.

    Like

  23. David August 24, 2014 at 8:54 AM #

    @Hants

    The problem with the debate we will have on this topic is that we want to do the same things with the same result. The premise of this blog is to question how existing resources were employed to send a team to the 2014 Commonwealth and to extrapolate from an obviously flawed position.

    Like

  24. Hants August 24, 2014 at 8:54 AM #

    @Bushie you ent learn not to pull the tail of pitbull ?

    Like

  25. ac August 24, 2014 at 8:56 AM #

    here is an excerpt from a South african article in relationship to the financial cost of building world class sports and the initiatives

    However, sport development costs money, which is not always readily available given the state of the economies of various Southern African nations.
    However, for Southern African sport to make the quantum leap forward there is an urgent need for mobilisation of local financial resources. The private sector of the various Southern African countries need to come to the party, just like in other regions of the world, and invest in the future of Southern African youth.
    Governments are already overloaded with other priorities on the development agenda such as education, health, energy, transport and infrastructural development.
    Of critical importance is the development and maintenance of sport facilities. Sporting facilities are the foundation or backbone of sport development. Without adequate facilities, it is very difficult to nurture and develop athletes or even promote enjoyment and health.
    ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..
    needless to say it is not as easy as you and bush tea would suggest,,,,especially in small nations that have no alternative mans of financial support,,,,,

    Like

  26. ac August 24, 2014 at 9:06 AM #

    David | August 24, 2014 at 8:54 AM |

    The problem with the debate we will have on this topic is that we want to do the same things with the same result. The premise of this blog is to question how existing resources were employed to send a team to the 2014 Commonwealth and to extrapolate from an obviously flawed position.

    ”””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””’
    the national Olympic committee ..help in the funding for countries that are participant members ,,,,

    Like

  27. David August 24, 2014 at 9:16 AM #

    The Acting Director of the NSC seems to be agreeing in part with BU’s position. The chef de mission Cammie Burke appears to be happy to paper over the issue. The bare face fact is that even if the individual federations received funding from the BOC there is no sensible reason why they have to make the trip if the athletes are barely making qualifying. Paul Mayers of VoB did an excellent sports capsule a couple weeks ago on this issue.

    Like

  28. Hants August 24, 2014 at 9:31 AM #

    How much did it cost Government to send the team to the games?

    There is nothing wrong with sending people who “barely qualified”.

    The issue is affordability.

    The path to an Olympic medal is via a USA University Scholarship.

    Like

  29. Life Changer + August 24, 2014 at 9:31 AM #

    @ David King. [BU] working for free..

    “NO PRIVATE INDIVIDUAL SHOULD BE BENEFITTING FROM LOTTERY EARNINGS. Let sport and culture benefit.”

    Barbados competed at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London, United Kingdom from 27 July to 12 August 2012. This nation marked its eleventh appearance at the Olympic games.

    The Barbados Olympic Association sent the nation’s smallest team to the Games. A total of six athletes, all men, participate only in athletics, judo, and swimming. The nation’s female athletes, however, failed to compete for the first time in its history since its national debut at the 1968 Summer Olympics in Mexico City. The Barbadian team also included backstroke and medley swimmer Bradley Ally, who competed at his third Olympic games. Sprint hurdler Ryan Brathwaite was appointed by the committee to be the nation’s flag bearer at the opening ceremony.

    Barbados left London, however, without winning a single Olympic medal for the third consecutive time. Brathwaite, the nation’s Olympic hopeful, nearly missed out of the medal standings, finishing abruptly in fifth place.

    Seems the ” Ministers” always enjoy these free travel peks..

    Like

  30. David August 24, 2014 at 9:35 AM #

    @Hants

    The issue is about creating a climate of excellence which sets athletes expectations. This is more than preparation for the high profile events like Worlds, Olympics etc, there are the college circuits where opportunities abound. As important is demonstrating to the youth themselves the decision makers are willing to efficiently execute on their behave, the leaders of tomorrow. What will be the spinoffs if such an ethos prevails you think?

    Like

  31. Artaxerxes August 24, 2014 at 9:36 AM #

    ac | August 24, 2014 at 7:06 AM |
    “a lot of big words wrapped up in nationalism ..pride and the flag….but who is willing to pay for Vibrancy in barbados,,,,, i see another march heading down broad street when the natives are asked to pay….”

    AC, I have to agree with your above comments. Barbadians will talk about sports strategy, sports programs, what should or should not happen in sports, and patriotism within the context of supporting our athletes. However, if we are asked to pay a sports levy to finance all these sports initiatives, how many of us would be willing to do?

    Take a serious look at sports such as motor sport, horse-racing, polo, equestrian, swimming, water-polo, surfing, and yachting, there is not a lack of private sector participation, in areas such as sponsorship and advertising. But just take another look at who engage in these types of activities and the answer will immediately come to mind.

    The reality is that we are continuing to “make sport” at our traditional sporting activities; they are not being taken seriously by the government or the private sector. We have Barbadians being selected for national teams and employers refusing to give them time off, thereby prohibiting them from performing their national duties. Some athletes have to walk around to various business places begging for sponsorship, washing cars, doing odd jobs, all in the effort of trying to raise funds. For example, Barry Forde, Ronald King, Adelbert Browne and Sammy Layne complained about the difficulties they experienced in securing sponsorship. over the past few years, Layne has been trying unsuccessfully to revive boxing in Barbados.

    Then we have a habit of rewarding one mediocre performance by hosting a ceremony where the private sector can indulge in the giving away of vehicles, money, house and land. There is hardly any investment in the initial development of these athletes, but the private sector uses these opportunities to capitalize on the advertising potential derived from those events. With the all the pomp behind him, this athlete is unable to give better performances thereafter.

    Like

  32. Life Changer + August 24, 2014 at 9:42 AM #

    @ Artexe
    Wecome back, been liking your wounds..

    It would be interesting to follow the “Money” as it trickles down to these projects…

    Seems it costs a lot to produce….
    Well less and less.

    What’s in your wallet.. Don’t think it’s justified hard earned …..

    Like

  33. David August 24, 2014 at 9:43 AM #

    Here is what President of the BOAC had to say about the the team which was sent to the recently held Commonwealth Games. There is obviously a wide gap if we measure by the performances at Commonwealths. Of course our detractors will see this as criticism but is it constructive?

    We have had a number of meetings with the Federations to find out their greatest needs and to my mind we should have one of the best prepared contingents based on the substantial investment that the BOA has made,” Stoute said.

    See more at: http://www.olympic.org.bb/?p=1965#sthash.oMntWl05.dpuf

    Like

  34. SuckaBubby August 24, 2014 at 9:50 AM #

    The problem is a two edged sword.

    Lack of seriousness by athletes and governmental incompetence.Howbeit non traditional sports like martial arts(not judo) and surfing has produced regional and world world champions?Their funding is private and they are compelled to take their disciplines seriously.No political photo-ops and no freeloaders flying.Observers have to pay their own way.

    It can work on other sports but as usual, our culture wont let it happen.So we can very well expect the trend of mediocrity to continue.

    Like

  35. ac August 24, 2014 at 10:04 AM #

    David | August 24, 2014 at 9:16 AM |

    The Acting Director of the NSC seems to be agreeing in part with BU’s position. The chef de mission Cammie Burke appears to be happy to paper over the issue. The bare face fact is that even if the individual federations received funding from the BOC there is no sensible reason why they have to make the trip if the athletes are barely making qualifying. Paul Mayers of VoB did an excellent sports capsule a couple weeks ago on this issue.
    ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….
    a lot of pontifi-cats….spouting off to make themselves look important ,

    the fact is that the countries are bound by rules and guidlines that might effect funding if they do not send athletes,,to substantiate a proof that the NOC is not wasting resources ….i meaning u David of all people should know these things ,,,,,and not be guided or distracted by small mouth imbeciles who talk sh,iit that makes no sense , … it is mandatory that member countries send an athlete or groups of athletes.except under unusual circumstances .in order to maintain membership.. and received resources from the NOC

    Like

  36. Life Changer + August 24, 2014 at 10:04 AM #

    @ Mr King..

    No church today..

    This again is a purely tactical aided response by the government and those power hungry aids who are fearful of introducing a statutory instrument or even legislation that does not meet the expectations of people. They want the mood to disippate over the next months in the hope that the government will get away with either doing nothing or get away with introducing something minimal or deficient.The good news is that the players are obvious for those who bother to look. Their game plan and even their play-by-play tactics are transparent, once you learn to spot them. However, it is not so easy to penetrate through the smokescreen of propaganda and disinformation to get to their underlying motives and goals. It would be convenient if we could point to a spin and a boldface liar,but this is a more subtle operation.

    The bad news: the conspiracy is global and there are many vested interest groups. A cursory investigation yields the usual suspects with a theoretical axe to grind, careers to further and the status quo to maintain. Their modus operandi is “The Days Big Concern”and the bigger and more widely publicised, daily the better to gather momentum…,

    Like

  37. Bush Tea August 24, 2014 at 10:11 AM #

    @ David
    Ok…here is our problem.
    In the absence of a common understanding of a national objective, we have different interest groups developing different strategies based on completely different objectives.

    You may think that Barbados should develop a focussed high level sports program to produce a number of world class athletes in a few sports.

    The Minister may think that we should aim for maximum involvement of as many citizens as possible in sporting activities as this produces multiple benefits in proactive health policies and social well-being.

    The current sport leaders may think that we should fund sport in such a manner that those whose votes keep them in position will continue to vote for them

    Sport administrators allocate their funds in much the same way that our politicians do…..targeted at winning elections.

    Most athletes do enough to get selected for tours….. A once in a lifetime chance to see the world for free….and to do so in relative luxury.

    John Citizen thinks that we should be able to beat the world’s best “with just a bit more effort”…

    What is needed FIRST of all is a national discussion on what we collectively want to aim for…..as a country….
    ….. To come up with a consensus on the goals and objectives we have selected
    ….and THEN make collective efforts to achieve THOSE goals. Otherwise, we are like the three blind men analyzing the elephant by touching different parts of his body….

    Like

  38. David August 24, 2014 at 10:19 AM #

    @Bush Tea

    Understand you last points made, sports means different things to different people. To BU Arts and Sports are necessary avenues to allow people of a country, especially the youth, to express themselves as humans yearn to do. How we execute national programs to achieve this high order need is where we find ourselves today. Bush Tea, we CANNOT boast of a high level of education and not leverage it to build a society fulsome of characteristics which satisfy our high order needs read Maslow.

    Like

  39. Artaxerxes August 24, 2014 at 10:42 AM #

    The government needs to get serious about sports and involve the private sector in collaborative effort to take sporting activities to another level. This could be done by giving concessions to sports companies that import professional sporting equipment and gear, so athletes can purchase them at reasonable rates. Or concessions could be given to companies that invest in sports, for example, such as netball, basketball, football, volleyball, table tennis, and athletics.

    For example, then there is a need to build a culture among athletes that they will interpret their area of sporting activity as a business and treat it accordingly, instead of a hobby; to see themselves as professionals and let their attitudes reflect professionalism. Persons qualified in sports ethics, psychology, and nutrition to teach athletes positive character development and how to compete honourably; how they should be involved to conduct seminars whereby athletes are taught how to conduct themselves in public, how to deal with suddenly becoming famous, speaking at interviews, anger management, etc; and the appropriate diets.
    One can remember the difficulties that surfaced for Venus and Serena Williams, and jockey Patrick Husbands during interviews. After the requisite training they are now better equipped to speak to the press without using “green verbs”. Such programs would benefit many of our cricketers, athletes and people like boxer Anderson Emmanuel who has anger management issues, or Suki King who is basically a dishonest individual [his record at National Sports Council speaks for itself].

    Like

  40. millertheanunnaki August 24, 2014 at 10:57 AM #

    @ David | August 24, 2014 at 10:19 AM |
    “How we execute national programs to achieve this high order need is where we find ourselves today. Bush Tea, we CANNOT boast of a high level of education and not leverage it to build a society fulsome of characteristics which satisfy our high order needs read Maslow.”

    David, You are rather philosophical! I like that of you.

    There is also a saying that ‘one cannot make a silk purse out of a sow’s ear’.
    Why are you expecting positive results at such level on the hierarchy of needs when the so-called elected leaders can’t even ‘mark fat’ (to use a local colloquial saying) at the basic level such as maintaining an hygienic environment and just as importantly supporting the need for discipline and a healthy respect for law and order at all levels of society?

    As has been said before the billions of dollars invested in ‘educating’ brass bowls (Bushie’s term for Bajans) have ended up in Maxwell pond. But then again, this is just one of the paradoxes of life.
    I hope Bush Tea understands. But for sure, Robert Ross the Rolls Ross in appreciating the human condition and “Piece of the Rock Yeah Right aka PODRYR the sage) understand.

    Like

  41. Well Well August 24, 2014 at 11:36 AM #

    The politicians as usual being the selfish pigs that they are still feel it’s about THEM and not about the YOUTH, the only concern of the powers-that-be is to be seen driving Benz, Beemers, traveling first class and making total asses of themselves with the minorities…..the personal development of the island’s youth is still of very little to no concern to these clowns until it’s time for them to enter their six foot holes.

    Like

  42. Well Well August 24, 2014 at 11:41 AM #

    Just in case BU crowd has any loved ones in the Bay Area

    http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/6-0-magnitude-earthquake-hits-san-francisco-bay-area-article-1.1914911

    Like

  43. Hants August 24, 2014 at 11:48 AM #

    Wwll Well, “driving Benz, Beemers, traveling first class”

    Barbados is a Capitalist country.

    Our well educated and or intelligent bloggers on BU know that we have been taught to aspire to be “Big Shots” and by extension owners of Big house, Big Car and all the trappings of success in a capitalist environment.

    Preaching altruistic socialist bullspit is just a lotta long talk.

    Like

  44. Colonel Buggy August 24, 2014 at 12:00 PM #

    @Well Well
    Nothing will change the mindset of Barbadians, towards their beloved god -like politicians . We like it so.
    Have you ever dealt with a Yankee salesman, the first thing he does is to butter you up, place you on the highest pedestal, then he tries to sell you crap,and with your head still in the size 18 mode, you may very well fall for it.
    This is what our politicians do to the ” most educated people in the world”

    Like

  45. Hants August 24, 2014 at 12:22 PM #

    @David it seems the bosses agree with me.

    http://www.bbc.com/sport/0/formula1/28920554

    Like

  46. David August 24, 2014 at 1:15 PM #

    @Hants

    What do you expect the Bosses to say? Mercedes is managing two rabid participants and are desperately trying to get to the end of the season.

    Like

  47. Hants August 24, 2014 at 1:37 PM #

    Wonder which team Hamilton will be going to next season.

    Like

  48. Life Changer + August 24, 2014 at 1:46 PM #

    @ The Blog master….

    The fact is simple, the ” fat cats ” club you call the government, looks after its friends first then they might, and big might do some work.

    As I keep saying, who is supposed to what by when out of which budget.

    The day for honouring your selfs will soon be at an end…

    No church today then….

    Like

  49. Life Changer + August 24, 2014 at 1:51 PM #

    We even have experts on FI…

    I’m sure if Hamilton, moved county to avoid the Tax’s of England, he wouldn’t move here, no pace….

    Like

  50. Life Changer + August 24, 2014 at 3:06 PM #

    Desmond worked for the Barbados Department of Transportation. One day he woke up ill, with a touch of laryngitis-but-being a dedicated employee he went to work. The boss felt rather sorry for him and didn’t want him to do any physical labour-as they were repairing a part of the highway
    “Desmond” he says “why don’t you go down the road and tell people to slow down going through the construction”
    Desmond is glad for the easy day: He stops the first vehicle:
    “Sir” he whispers, his throat feeling worse “please slow down, there’s a Government crew up ahead”
    “Okay” the guy whispers back “I’ll try not to wake them.”

    Like

  51. Well Well August 24, 2014 at 5:16 PM #

    The US Attorney General Holder, parents were born in Barbados.

    Hants and Colonel…..that’s why it’s called brainwash ‘capitalist’ education, to make you the fool. We know that now, don’t think anyone is interested in changing it though.

    Like

  52. ac August 24, 2014 at 5:24 PM #

    another problem that is well entrenched in sports in barbados is the issue of classism…an issue which is slightly touch… but like an overgrown vine rubs itself and uproot those seeds which are aspiring to be giants in the fields of athletic ,,,,

    Like

  53. David August 24, 2014 at 6:29 PM #

    We have been searching for a Barbados government website that deals with Youth Affairs.

    Like

  54. Life Changer + August 24, 2014 at 7:08 PM #

    “The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.” ~Lao Tzu

    Each step you take toward a bigger goal might not seem like much. It may seem like you’re not really doing much at all. This will be especially true of any outside observers. Others might think you’re not getting anywhere, that you’re not getting anything done. That’s why you have to have a lot of confidence in where you’re going. You need to be clear about where you want to end up so that you have the conviction that the small steps you are taking will eventually get you to where you want to be, and you can squash any naysayers.

    Like

  55. Bush Tea August 24, 2014 at 7:43 PM #

    @ David
    So what happened to the grand “new youth policy” proclaimed by little Hitler?

    Like

  56. David August 24, 2014 at 7:50 PM #

    @Bush Tea

    Perhaps it can be found the same place where the Antiquities Bill languishes.

    Like

  57. Due Diligence August 24, 2014 at 10:09 PM #

    In the opening paragraph of this blog David said the team sent to the 2014 Commonwealth Games was comprised of 104 athletes and officials.

    In the BOA website a list of the Barbados Commonwealth Games Contingent 2014 is at http://www.olympic.org.bb/?p=1965

    In a quick count I come up with 70 names of athletes.

    That leaves 34 “officials”

    Seems like most of the athletes were in over their heads.

    The 34 officials, on the other hand, must have been right in their element – 5 Star traveling, wining and dining amongst themselves at the expense of the ordinary taxpayers.

    Like

  58. David August 24, 2014 at 10:18 PM #

    @DD

    The good thing about the numbers is the 2 to 1 ratio, the parents of the athletes must have been very happy.

    Like

  59. Due Diligence August 24, 2014 at 10:21 PM #

    Oh, and don’t forget, there will be team going off to Pan Am 2015 games in Toronto in just over 10 months.

    See http://www.toronto2015.org/about-us/pan-am-games

    Like

  60. Due Diligence August 24, 2014 at 10:25 PM #

    David

    Those 34 must have been very expensive chaperones, if indeed they found any time for the athletes.

    Like

  61. Bush Tea August 25, 2014 at 8:48 AM #

    @ DD
    Don’t get carried away.
    In high level sport, the role of the officials is often MORE crucial to any kind of success than is the athlete.
    Managers, coaches and trainers….not to mention doctors and physios are CRITICAL components of any serious team.
    …and it is NOT always fun and games for these officials either….it can be quite hectic….

    Having said that, there will always be those officials who take advantage of the situation and whose poor performances may well be the CAUSE of poor athlete performances….
    ….ask Oba about Mr. “I want a Plantation” :)

    The athletes then get the blame and these un-named officials get to continue their poor performances year after year with new athlete “scrape goats”. Why do you think it is that in more enlightened countries the OFFICIALS are kicked out when performances are below par…..?

    In BB Barbados we dump the athletes while the administrators hang around for decades…..making asinine excuses….
    This is why so many promising young talents disappear from the scene…..

    Like

  62. David August 25, 2014 at 10:55 AM #

    @Hants

    You should check LH’s FB’s page. He let it all out.

    @Bush Tea

    The importance of the administrator is not in question but there must be a positive relationship in resources allocated to support international meets and predetermined benchmarks.

    Like

  63. Due Diligence August 25, 2014 at 11:05 AM #

    Bush Tea

    @ DD
    Don’t get carried away.

    In high level sport, the role of the officials is often MORE crucial to any kind of success than is the athlete.
    Managers, coaches and trainers….not to mention doctors and physios are CRITICAL components of any serious team.

    …and it is NOT always fun and games for these officials either….it can be quite hectic….

    ……..the administrators hang around for decades…..making asinine excuses….

    This is why so many promising young talents disappear from the scene…..

    Thank you – noted

    Like

  64. Concern Citizen August 26, 2014 at 10:20 PM #

    This post was obviously written by someone that knows very little about the nature of sports who is just about being critical of everything going on in Barbados including our sports program. Barbados is facing a serious crisis not just economically but in our national identity. Stories like this only contribute further. Barbados should be commended for having that many athletes qualify for Commonwealth Games and should take every last one every time. Look at all the hundreds of English, Australians etc. that did not get a medal. If the opportunity to get a medal is the only reason for countries to take part in sport then no one should send a team. Please write something that makes sense and stop wasting people’s time pulling down the country.

    Like

  65. Colonel Buggy August 26, 2014 at 10:51 PM #

    Bush Tea | August 25, 2014 at 8:48 AM |
    Managers, coaches and trainers….not to mention doctors and physios are CRITICAL components of any serious team.
    …and it is NOT always fun and games for these officials either….it can be quite hectic….
    …………………………………………………………………………..
    And this was borne out recently, when apparently bad management, caused Suki to be almost stranded in Italy on a one-way ticket, and eventually not completing the tournament.

    Like

  66. David August 27, 2014 at 3:32 AM #

    @Concern Citizen

    You should also direct your comment to the government who through its spokesman the Acting Deputy Director of the NSC echoed the same concern as BU. His comment is quoted in the blog in case you need to have a reread. Remember there is no place for mediocrity in this world, those who strive for excellence stand to bead the odds to make it to the top.

    Like

  67. Bush Tea August 27, 2014 at 8:48 AM #

    @ David
    Note that Concerned Citizen speaks about “qualifying” to participate.

    This is all about aiming for mediocracy. Perhaps this is our national objective….to get as many people on these tours as possible.
    Qualifying standards are the bare minimum levels of performance to be allowed to attend….and we have officials who brag about achieving this…
    Unless we can find leaders who understand the need to get athletes to be the VERY BEST that they can be….and who can encourage and support such goals, perhaps we do best to continue to assemble large tour groups.

    This is NOT a unique sports problem….it is a NATIONAL LEADERSHIP weakness.

    Compare Jamaica’s national sports leaders with our own – and you will see why that (financially challenged) country does so well compared to us….

    Like

  68. Hants August 27, 2014 at 9:06 AM #

    Athletic and sports development programs should include continuous education to make athletes employable after they stop competing.

    Like

  69. Life Changer + August 27, 2014 at 10:44 AM #

    Each parent has a choice in their childrens edication here… In parts of America -The school rule known as “No Pass/No Play” is designed to motivate high school students to pass every class, or be barred from school-sponsored extracurricular activities. “No pass” means no football, no drama, no nothing, for students with failing grades.

    The rule sends some powerful messages about education.

    Like

  70. Life Changer + August 27, 2014 at 11:00 AM #

    More than 10,000 athletes from around the world will compete in the upcoming Olympics. All have the same dream, to win a gold medal. But not all dreams are equal. Athletic training costs money, so athletes from rich nations will most likely win more medals than those from poor countries. How a country funds its Olympic program is not only an indicator of likely success, it also reflects each nation’s social and political values. So with the Island attorneys and ministers leading that “race” funding we are always assured of a timely responce.

    Like

  71. David August 27, 2014 at 11:02 AM #

    @Artax

    Send a note to this person:

    Forum to help revitalise City

     

    Forum to help revitalise City

    Sharon Christie, chairperson of The Revitalisation of Bridgetown Initiative. (GP)

    Wed, June 18, 2014 – 5:07 PM

    Chairperson of The Revitalisation of Bridgetown Initiative (TRBI) Sharon Christie will attend the United States and Latin American Mayors’ Forum which is being hosted by the Emerging and Sustainable Cities Initiative (ESCI) in Dallas, tomorrow and Friday.

    More than 300 U.S. mayors and private sector representatives will converge at the forum to exchange ideas and best practices in urban development.

    TRBI is hoping to gain additional information on the innovative public private partnerships that have revived Dallas’ urban areas with a view of adapting it to revitalise the City of Bridgetown as well as draw on the various models used to advance sustainable cities.

    TRBI was formed through the Barbados Chamber of Commerce and Industry (BCCI) to stimulate increased economic and social activity within the nation’s capital. Christie has chaired the TRBI project for over two years and has played an integral role in the BCCI’s strides towards breathing new life into our city.

    “The BCCI is grateful to the Inter-American Development Bank for their ongoing support of the BCCI’s drive towards Local Economic Development and the ESCI project,” say BCCI Executive Director Lisa Gale.  (PR)

    Like

  72. Life Changer + August 27, 2014 at 11:20 AM #

    “Investigators in the US and the UK revealed that BCCI had been “set up deliberately to avoid centralized regulatory review, and operated extensively in bank secrecy jurisdictions. Its affairs were extraordinarily complex. Its officers were sophisticated international bankers whose apparent objective was to keep their affairs secret, to commit fraud on a massive scale, and to avoid detection.” Unquote

    “B.C.C.I. was a full-service bank,” says an international arms dealer who frequently worked with the clandestine bank units.

    “They not only financed arms deals that one government or another wanted to keep secret, they shipped the goods in their own ships, insured them with their own agency and provided manpower and security. They worked with intelligence agencies from all the Western countries and did a lot of business with East bloc countries.”

    Should we be associate in a financial marriage – bearing in mind the facts –
    is the blog master suggesting further transparency – or is he advocating we just accept money from anywhere ?

    Like

  73. Bush Tea August 27, 2014 at 1:59 PM #

    LOL
    Ha Ha Ha
    Ohhhhhh shiRT!!!!

    Like

  74. Hants August 27, 2014 at 2:47 PM #

    Bushie stop laughing.

    The Bank of Credit and Commerce International (BCCI) was a major international bank founded in 1972 by Agha Hasan Abedi, a Pakistani financier.[1] The Bank was registered in Luxembourg with head offices in Karachi and London. Within a decade BCCI touched its peak. It operated in 78 countries, had over 400 branches, and had assets in excess of US$20 billion, making it the 7th largest private bank in the world by assets.[2][3]

    Like

  75. Bush Tea August 27, 2014 at 5:46 PM #

    @ Hants
    True dat!

    But according to David| August 27, 2014 at 11:02 AM
    ++++++++++++++++++++
    “TRBI was formed through the Barbados Chamber of Commerce and Industry (BCCI) to stimulate increased economic and social activity within the nation’s capital.”

    Like

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