Our Energy Policy is Adrift

The positive coming out of the Muni Tax outrage which is embroiling the country is the focus on the need to examine the cost of energy and solid waste disposal management. The overarching issue threading the vexing issues is poor governance; no transparency, and an unwillingness to implement Freedom of Information and Integrity legislation. The rights of citizens in a democracy must be respected by those elected to serve. This government offered to be more transparent than any other in our post Independence history, the fact that transparency legislation remains outstanding 6 years after being elected does not mean it cannot practice transparency in its decision making.

Barbadians want to know what guarantees have been agreed between the PEOPLE of Barbados (government) and Cahill Energy. And we want to know before the project passes the point of no return. To ask questions should not be interpreted as being against the project, although this is a possibility when all the fact are known, it is about being transparent, something which a government led by Mr. Integrity himself has encountered some difficulty.

Here is a blog posted earlier which deserves greater circulation. It deals with the Barbados Light & Power variable in the equation which focuses on the elephants in the room – Barbados Light & Power and Fair Trading Commission.

Barbados Underground

The following submission probes government’s energy policy

Barbados Light and Power headquarters on Bay Street Barbados Light and Power headquarters on Bay Street

Our energy policy is becoming more and more perplexing. So much so that any reasonable person analyzing the decisions and statements of those whose stewardship we depend on for efficient, reliable, sustainable energy practices would conclude that presently we as a nation could not be any further adrift. Commenting on the same issue, and on the need for a coherent energy blueprint, a well-known businessman recently opined that “there does not seem to be a well –defined and quantified, coordinated and integrated energy policy being articulated by government.” While there may be some merit in this statement, many would argue that any incoherence in our energy policy resides mainly in two locations: Spring Garden and Green Hill.

A clear example of incoherent messaging is the Barbados Light and Power (BL&P) advertisement of Friday May 9th…

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46 Comments on “Our Energy Policy is Adrift”

  1. Life changer July 13, 2014 at 8:10 AM #

    Corruption is one of three categories of fraud recognised. Delays in prompt reports could well indicate financial statement fraud and the misappropriation of assets/embezzlement). The standards to which Directors of Internal Audit are held are clear: specifically they stipulate that “the internal auditor must possess sufficient knowledge to be able to recognize evidence of fraud, but he or she is not expected to possess the expertise of an individual whose primary responsibility is the detection and investigation of fraud.” In my opinion the most important term in this quotation is that of ‘evidence’ as its delays evokes even the simplest Bajan to the services of the people. It is not a question of direct proof but more one of ‘an indication’ that should create at least a minimum of doubt or suspicion.
    Not many have faith in the slippery ness
    of words anymore, Bajans would like to SEE, where all this money is going, with timely reports and people simply DOING THEIR JOBS.

    Like

  2. David July 13, 2014 at 8:15 AM #

    Someone stated recently Bajans are quick to discuss – at length – issues related to politics and religion however when it comes to financial and related issues we appear perplex and driven to silence. One reason the Fair Trading Commission, EMERA and BL&P, now the government and Cahill (Waster to Energy) can do what they do is because they know Bajans will not force the issue to a tipping point to force a revisit. A big part of the reason is that we have no authority in the local media to ventilate and demystify these kinds of issues.

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  3. Political Watcher July 13, 2014 at 9:39 AM #

    Independence Square 2007: Denis Lowe speaks about the need for civil society to engage government and the worrying corruption in government in such agencies as UDC.

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  4. Political Watcher July 13, 2014 at 9:47 AM #

    @David, Final part of his presentation. Is the same Denis Lowe who begs for Chris and himself who is loved by the same prime minister who seems to be losing his mind due to diabetes? iIs this the same Denis Lowe who now driving a BMW costing a quarter million dollars while NCC workers getting sent home?

    Oh Michael Lashley also driving a BMW X5 what a coincidence that the two most ministers who the most allegations surround. No wonder the want to shut down BU.

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  5. Political Watcher July 13, 2014 at 9:54 AM #

    @david, mainstream media is compromised plus the burden of proof lies with the accuser and not with accused to defend. Thus no amount of reading of the blogs by the police or DPP will see any politician getting locked up. Justice unfortunately may come only when the man in the street see the duplicity of law enforcement and decides to take the law into their own hands. That should be the fear of every bajan for 1937 will be kid gloves to what would happen now.

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  6. redydun July 13, 2014 at 9:57 AM #

    Write a letter and send it to the relevent people. Are there any lawers brave enough?

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  7. Hamilton Hill July 13, 2014 at 10:06 AM #

    @ David. .Much of what has gone on, and continues to go on in Barbados goes under the radar of public scrutiny for the simple reason that the mainstream media, just like the political class is bent on the maintenance of an uninformed population. Why is it, do you think that they are so concerned about the social media? Ours is a culture of once I get mine the hell with all others. That is why the entirety of this BU family must intensify the campaign to spread the word that social media will be the launching pad towards a reliable system of checks and balances. I encourage all of my friends and acquaintances to get involved, if not here on BU, somewhere else. I tell them just get involved. How else can we begin to level the playing field?

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  8. Lemuel July 13, 2014 at 10:10 AM #

    I continue to state on this blog that Barbados is a banana republic! Yet, some here want Barbados to operate like a first world or second world country with all the trappings of social agitation against wrongs or perceived wrongs!! We have totally bought and swallowed the PILL of enslavement!!

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  9. Pachamama July 13, 2014 at 10:16 AM #

    @ Hamilton Hill
    You are right. But their agents are trying to influence new or alternative media too. This is the new battlefield for the minds as the mainstreamers are losing audiences, big time! Not only in Bim, but throughout the world the same is true.

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  10. Life changer July 13, 2014 at 10:47 AM #

    look at what your saying.
    Food, health, sanitation, shelter and water are the basic necessities to survive, and yet are constant struggles to provide in real 3rd world countries. I feel overtly grateful for the items I take for granted daily when I think of my own existence, and the fact that I struggle for none. Money is not an issue other than the corruption that influences it. We live in a wealthy world and can afford to rebuild it a few times over if we had to, especially here in Barbados.

    All of which are being implemented, designed and developed for those in need in the modern world now and rapidly. Most of the children today in deep Africa whom are fortunate to receive an education in most cases will never use a simple desktop computer. Education, communication, information and networking can all happen simultaneously now with the use of smart phones, tablets and laptops. Reporting crime and violence, requesting medical advice, ordering agricultural supplies, and organizing small business or family budgets can all be done with relative ease today.

    All this borrowing, and delays allow for corruption. Is your electric or water meter corrupt, No, if you don’t pay you will have to suffer, may even get cut off, yet still have the bill. If I ask for a statement at the bank, it will tell me how I spent and when. Banks make money by managing our money, the electric company as well as the water company to make money because they control a service. The government makes money, supposedly for the nation. When you ask for a goverment statement on services or one is due, seems they have no figures or maybe the wrong ones.

    What would you yourself do if, you had no accounts, for your services and didn’t know how much you’ve used.
    Perhaps ask a neighbour? Simple account auditing will give you all the governments predictions and overspending. Then perhaps you can see where all the missing millions are.

    Instead of waiting for more manipulated figures. There should be an app for this, kind of a weather forecast on the economy. Never mined whats in your wallet, what’s going to be in your children’s, someone has to pay the bills…

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  11. Life changer July 13, 2014 at 11:17 AM #

    I noted once again, the use of when and if, timeless negative responses.
    Let me be quite bold to you sir; ” IF my aunt had bollocks she would be my uncle” & “WHEN the lights go out it gets dark, unless you put the lights on.”
    In this country, anyone with a view seems to have a potitical point of view on that subject.
    Form someone lucky enuff, who studied PUBLIC POLICY in 1st, 2nd & third world countries with the degrees-
    Food, health, sanitation, shelter and water are the basic necessities to survive, and yet are constant struggles to provide in 3rd world countries. These are mostly seen as busineses in the develoded moden world, that are main stream.
    I feel overtly grateful for the items I take for granted daily when I think of my own existence, and the fact that I struggle for none. Did you know, Money is not an issue on this Island other than the corruption that influences it.
    We live in a wealthy world and can afford to rebuild it a few times over if we had to even, in Barbados.

    All of which are being implemented, designed and developed for those in need in the modern world now and rapidly. How Barbados provides these services still amazes me.
    Most of the children today in deep Africa whom are fortunate to receive an education, in most cases will never use a desktop computer. World wide Education, communication, information and networking can all happen simultaneously now with the use of smart phones, tablets and laptops. Reporting crime and violence, requesting medical advice, ordering agricultural supplies, and organizing small business or family budgets can all be done with relative ease today.
    Perhaps a goverment app, for our small wealthy Isand, may speed up our own accounting, for data balances and statements. If we are having service problems who suppose to deal with them…

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  12. Well Well July 13, 2014 at 11:55 AM #

    The Bushman….Bizzy is seeing the light, he is seeing things your way.

    http://www.nationnews.com/articles/view/bizzy-dump-waste-tax/

    Of course we all know that might have something to do with the fact that the muni tax bills of the minorities are a hell of a lot bigger than that of the majority poor.

    One friend of mind with land no structure got a bill for $5,500.00.

    Let’s hope the shit-for-brains MOF and other DLP ministers realize the problems they will get going forward…..as long as people legally agitate, it will stop these idiots and their parasitic friends in their tracks.

    Hamilton Hill | July 13, 2014 at 10:06 AM |

    @ David. .Much of what has gone on, and continues to go on in Barbados goes under the radar of public scrutiny for the simple reason that the mainstream media, just like the political class is bent on the maintenance of an uninformed population.

    Well said Hamilton…..why do you think Cow and Bizzy , BLP/DLP et al don’t want the blogs, they are content to keep the majority blacks on the island ignorant, therefore it’s much easier to enrich themselves off the backs of same.

    Like

  13. SuckaBubby July 13, 2014 at 12:41 PM #

    I dont see why our energy policy is or should be adrift.We had a brilliant mind who walked and worked among us.Professor Oliver Headley’s work is documented and should be our first point of reference in moving our energy policy forward.

    “The sun will still shine when the oil runs out” ..The Late Professor Oliver Headley.

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  14. Well Well July 13, 2014 at 12:49 PM #

    SUCKA said:
    “Oliver Headley’s work is documented and should be our first point of reference in moving our energy policy forward.”

    Now they see what happens when they destroy the most brilliant and creative black minds who reside among them.

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  15. Konkieman July 13, 2014 at 12:52 PM #

    The subject heading here is inaccurate. Energy policy is not adrift, there is none! Look, I work for a EU energy company hey in de US, and we floating nuff liquified natural gas (LNG) tankers out of TT up to Boston and Puerto Rico and even to the Far East. We cut Puerto Rico energy costs in half at one of their power plants by displacing the oil they were burning with LNG.

    The plant to convert LNG back to pipeline gas is not that expensive. Think how much FX Bdos can save burning TT gas in BL&P plants instead of costly oil. It also gives Bim the option of putting in a gas pipeline infrastructure for homes, businesses and industries and get rid of costly bottle gas.

    Also, electric solar cell costs are coming down now to the point they are equal to grid power costs (I would hazard a guess they are lower than BL&P costs already). The Caribbean can be complemented for their roof top solar heating of water. Any where I go in the world, I don’t see the concentration of solar water heaters of roofs than in the Caribbean. Just apply this to PV solar cells and even if each house only displaces 25% of their electricity, that is nuff FX in the bank.

    It needs political will and common sense but that is a serious conflict these days.

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  16. David July 13, 2014 at 12:53 PM #

    The problem is abour reducing the cost of energy AND converting to waste.

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  17. Well Well July 13, 2014 at 12:56 PM #

    What bothers a lot of people is that the sun is free, Barbados is situated directly above the sun, between Capricorn and Sagittarius…..it’s free and they are not using it, FREE being the operative work…….I am wondering if the politicians even take time out from their scams with these business people to look up at the sun.

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  18. Hamilton Hill July 13, 2014 at 1:08 PM #

    @ Pachamama & Well Well..It’s good to know that there is agreement to this train of thought. Now do your part in terms of spreading the message. Anyone with whom you come in contact who does not for what ever reason follow social media, please keep them abreast of what is going on in sweet Barbados. With the groundswell of public support the now popular path to personal wealth could well lead to a term of incarceration as it does here in the US, Canada and Britain. As copycats why not go the whole nine yards? They sit back and enjoy the spoils of their nefarious misdeeds at our expense, therefore why not treat them to a stay at the VECHO TOWERS?

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  19. Well Well July 13, 2014 at 1:09 PM #

    Then there is the mule who is hell-bent and intent to charge forward with an unwarranted money-grab, will he listen to his boss Bizzy….lol

    http://www.nationnews.com/articles/view/chris-give-tax-time/

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  20. David July 13, 2014 at 1:12 PM #

    Would any government serious about sending the right message and exercising strong leadership not instruct its ministers to buy solar powered cars?

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  21. Well Well July 13, 2014 at 1:14 PM #

    Hamilton……not a day goes by that I don’t make people aware world-wide of what the politicians and their bribers are doing to Bajans. It might take time for the whole population to realize what is being done to them, but be assured that it’s been years i am making people aware of the situation on the ground there, since i became aware in 2004 while visiting, even though i am not now present, it’s heartbreaking to see what they are doing.

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  22. David July 13, 2014 at 1:28 PM #

    Solar power sets a record in California By Steve Scauzillo, San Gabriel Valley Tribune POSTED: 07/12/14, 11:26 PM PDT | 0 COMMENTS This factoid came across my desk a few weeks ago:

    On June 1, California recorded a record hourly peak of 4,767 megawatts of solar electricity to the grid, the U.S. Energy Information Administration reported.

    In short, the folks who supply electrical power, the California Independent System Operator (CAISO), are using record amounts of utility-generated solar, even if it is only about 5,000 MW out of a summer demand of 35,000 MW.

    The U.S. EIA is reporting solar energy is being used by CAISO to keep the lights on and the air conditioners humming in late spring and early summer.

    In May, during the peak time for energy between 11 a.m. and noon, solar supplied 14 percent of the state’s total power, as compared to 6 percent in May 2013, the U.S. EIA reported. When taking an average of the peak hourly generation for each month, solar energy sent to the grid jumped 150 percent in the same period.

    I found this impressive for two reasons. One, this is not some California pro-solar agency reporting. This is a national agency that looks at electrical power sources in all 50 states. Second, the EIA is only talking about utility-generated solar power. California also has what it calls “behind-the-meter” solar like those installed in people’s homes or on building rooftops. Though small solar was not counted in its report, the EIA noted California installed 750 megawatts of residential and commercial solar photovoltaics in 2013 “further reducing midday baseload power demand.”

    I spoke to an expert and an advocate of alternative energy, Evan Gillespie, western regional deputy director of the Sierra Club’s Beyond Coal Campaign who provided perspective.

    California is a leader in solar, which makes sense. We get a lot of sunshine. The Golden State may reach the legislative goal of 33 percent alternative energy by 2020 early, he said, mostly because solar and wind power are growing.

    But the United States is not at that percentage, unlike Germany which is approaching 50 percent of its electrical power from alternative-energy sources.

    But for California, solar projects like those you see in the Mojave Desert are making a difference in the daily supply of electricity to homes. “On the hottest days, when everyone has the AC cranking, solar is literally keeping the lights on,” Gillespie said.

    Those who don’t believe it are using old energy statistics, he said. That’s because American energy production has soared in the last decade, including more use of natural gas to make electricity as well as wind, solar and geothermal power.

    And it is not just a California thing.

    Gillespie said the state using the most wind power is Texas. And the next solar market to explode is in Georgia, he said. “One of the big reasons is energy independence,” he said.

    So it’s not just about green energy or the California mandate to get off coal and fossil fuels because it is causing the globe to warm up. “Clean energy is a non-partisan issue,” he said.

    The biggest problem with the ramp-up of solar energy (the EIA says California accounted for 75 percent of the new utility-scale solar capacity last year) is an inevitable slow-down after the state meets its greenhouse gas reduction goals in 2020.

    Gillespie and others are concerned that jobs could be lost if solar slows down.

    In California, the 47,000 solar jobs are more than employed by the big three utility companies combined: Southern California Edison, San Diego Gas & Electric and Pacific Gas & Electric, according to Gillespie’s own research.

    In the U.S., the coal industry employs 87,000 people while clean energy industries employ 360,000, according to the EIA. Half of those in coal worked in two states: Kentucky and West Virginia, according to the EIA. As of November 2013, 143,000 people worked in the solar industry in the United States, according to a very recent census study from the Solar Foundation.

    Whether solar becomes the dominant energy choice remains to be seen. But its impact on the grid, the economy and in particular, the job market, is already being felt.

    ABOUT THE AUTHOR

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  23. Bush Tea July 13, 2014 at 1:38 PM #

    Yawn!
    With an annual fuel bill of $800M….
    What would you guess of this amount would constitute total government income inclusive of VAT, taxes, profits in reselling to BL&P, storage charges, shipping charges, etc.?
    Pick a number…..

    Now when you move to mass solar, how do you replace that ANNUAL revenue?
    Who do they lay off?
    Whose cash cows will be depleted?

    Next thing you will suggest (like Miller) is that they restrict the importation of vehicles…especially luxury cars…..
    You know how much $$$$$ that is PER YEAR? At a tax rate of over 100%? Then road taxes, vat on parts imports, ……
    …call a number…

    They had hoped to use the garbage / WTE deals to replace these revenue cows, but the large numbers required to make it meaningful as an revenue earner gives the game away….

    Wunna don’t seem to understand that even if we had competent, bright leaders, who had the balls to make sound decisions……OUR ASSES WILL STILL BE LITTERING THE GRASSES….

    We had a good run, living on our various credit cards, but now the interest has caught up with us and the creditors are beginning to worry about having to write off bad debt….
    They have already moved in to repossess much of our “stuff”….like BET, ICB, BNB, BL&P, BS&T etc…
    Next they will ask us to not trespass on MASSA(Y) property and to find somewhere to live….especially when we have to sell the little bush hut to pay Stinkler’s shiite tax….

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  24. David July 13, 2014 at 1:42 PM #

    @Tea Bush

    Can you in two sentences describe how the optics on our minister of the environment driving a BMW X5 look?

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  25. islandgal246 July 13, 2014 at 2:14 PM #

    Tek some pictures and post of the Ministers cars and show us the damn stinking lot doing with our money. Bajans need to be reminded that it is their monies that these fuc*ing leeches living high on.

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  26. Well Well July 13, 2014 at 5:04 PM #

    All this publicity has put Bizzy in an awkward position re ‘shite tax’. If it’s challenged in court as it should be knowing how molasses like the Judges move it will be 2044 before a decision/judgement is rendered by a potential Judge who is now in his/hers 20’s, Bizzy will be 102 so he can’t enjoy the proceeds of that scam he dreamed up, so scratch that, on to the next scam, if he sues the government for breach of contract, same result…lol…..oh Bizzy, the next scam may well be just as disastrous, guess your scamming days of the Bajan taxpayer is nearly over, to besides Sinckler can count better than you and those millions are looking real good right about now with or without your approval……..lol

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  27. David July 13, 2014 at 5:11 PM #

    Why blame Bizzy?

    If you observe closely Bajan Whites have stepped away from operating in the retail business and taken up shop in the financial services arena; now the waste to energy business beacons. Nothing wrong with a class of people showing smarts and acumen, it is the other class who sits passive and …

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  28. Well Well July 13, 2014 at 5:30 PM #

    Nothing at all wrong with showing business acumen and smarts, but not at the expense of the taxpayers and not when politicians are involved in the scam and will also benefit at the expense of taxpayers.

    Four Seasons and the loss of NIS money is quite enough loss for any taxpayer.

    Bizzy can take his scams somewhere else, it’s called free enterprise.

    This is a learning curve for the passive class in Barbados, hope they have learned something.

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  29. David July 13, 2014 at 5:32 PM #

    @Well Well

    Stop spouting emotional crap.

    Anybody can come up with an idea it is up to the authorities to do the due diligence.

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  30. Well Well July 13, 2014 at 5:50 PM #

    David……listen to this, i am the least emotional of females, in saying that, Cow and Bizzy love to present themselves on tv gushing about how they love Barbados, they never said thy loved bajans and tra la la la la, it has come out of Bizzy’s mouth that they bribe both political parties, they can call it whatever, campaign financing, charity, it is called bribes because they expect large contracts to the tune of millions of taxpayer’s dollars in return for the few hundred thousands in bribes, they also expect thousands of acres of lands some belonging to poor, old people in Barbados for those bribes they pay the politicians……..you have never seen me give the politicians a pass, in my view they are both DLP/BLP low life scum who would sell-out their own people for a song, a car, many millions as long as it benefits them………..i am never going to say Bizzy/Cow are right to do what they do, it’s wrong, even if the people in Barbados are passive, stupid, slow, retarded, it’s still wrong….

    One would think Bizzy/Cow would know when they have had enough, but oh no, no one else must benefit in Barbados but them……they still will not be able to take it with them and the way things are going on the island they sure as shit may not live long enough to enjoy the next scam…….unless they have found a way to pay for the next fifty years of life…..steupss..

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  31. Political Watcher July 13, 2014 at 5:54 PM #

    (Creating energy or a smokescreen)

    “Using municipal solid waste also avoids the land-use conflicts that plague wood-based or crop-based energy. And as long as the recovery of recyclable material remains profitable, there will be a sifting process to take out any potentially hazardous elements before incineration.

    While gasification is a well-trodden technology in some fields, it is a relatively new procedure for household waste. To date, there are various municipal solid waste gasification projects in the works, but none in commercial operation in the United States. As a result, many of the reports and studies on the Cleveland plant are hypothetical, say critics.

    Citizen groups believe Cleveland Public Power’s gasification talk is a smokescreen for another incinerator project.

    “They don’t want to call it an incinerator because they know the public opposition to incineration,” said Sandy Buchanan, executive director of Ohio Citizen Action.

    In February, U.S. EPA criticized the Ohio EPA for issuing a draft air pollution permit for the Cleveland Recycling and Energy Generation Center. If the center emitted 194 tons of acid rain-causing nitrogen oxides each year, as projected in the permit application, it would be releasing 94 tons more than is allowed under the synthetic minor permitting limits in the Clean Air Act. The center would need to apply for a Prevention of Significant Deterioration permit, much like high-emitting fossil fuel plants.

    In addition, because Cleveland Public Power would process 70 tons of trash per day, it would have to be considered a major emitter under the category “municipal incinerators capable of charging more than 50 tons of refuse per day.”

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  32. David July 13, 2014 at 5:55 PM #

    The following extract from the blog is insightful:

    Renewable energy is now affordable but who pays to make it dispatchable? This is the question the Czars of Spring Garden and Green Hill must answer because it requires a new way of thinking. Utilities are being threatened worldwide by plummeting solar costs. The challenge for us will become greater as battery storage becomes more affordable. Ultimately, those whose stewardship we depend on will have to respond by either employing a new business model or by erecting barriers in the form of regulation of capacity to protect the outdated model that currently exists.

    Like

  33. David July 13, 2014 at 6:05 PM #

    Like

  34. islandgal246 July 13, 2014 at 6:07 PM #

    Well Well I am getting real tired of your repetitive crap about white people in Barbados. it is getting old real old. Black people now have assets and some money. Why can’t they get together and do business?? They want a BIG company and want to run it like a one door shop. You claim to be well off why don’t you invest in your country, come home and invest.

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  35. Well Well July 13, 2014 at 6:15 PM #

    Island…..exactly when did i tell you i was well off? please show proof, i don’t remember ever discussing my finances here on BU, i mentioned i have done business in several countries.

    As a matter of fact, blacks like you in Barbados deserve exactly what you are getting, you are being sold out to one group of people on the island who are minorities, bajan whites and a few others, you are marching, why i am still not sure, but when others point out the root causes of the problems in Barbados, you don’t want to hear them, how can anyone take you dumb, passive people seriously.

    Why won’t i invest in Barbados, because i would not want idiots like you, the politicians and the local Bizzys and Cows robbing me, nor would i want people like you selling me out to Bizzy………do you get my drift….oh passive one.

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  36. David July 13, 2014 at 6:18 PM #

    Don’t turn this important topic into a shouting match, the idiocy of it is that we are all mostly anonymous.

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  37. Well Well July 13, 2014 at 6:19 PM #

    It appears blacks in Barbados do not have the intelligence to come up with a waste management plan, blacks who Island claim are wealthy, so why does no one want to pay the taxes that would allow Bizzy to fix the waste management problems? Everyone should just pay the tax and shut up about it so that Bizzy can make his 34 million, what is wrong with you people.

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  38. Hamilton Hill July 13, 2014 at 7:41 PM #

    While the fight continues about which class shows innovation, some member or members of that special class are making preparation to buy another big boy toy, or another bank account off the Caribbean shores. Arthur’s band got theirs and this present group is hell bent on getting theirs as well. It really makes no difference whether the investor is black or white.The greased palms have a complexion similar to yours and mine. Sad but true.

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  39. Paradox July 13, 2014 at 9:55 PM #

    Well said Hamilton…..why do you think Cow and Bizzy , BLP/DLP et al don’t want the blogs, they are content to keep the majority blacks on the island ignorant, therefore it’s much easier to enrich themselves off the backs of same.
    Blame must be firmly planted at the feet of both political parties. The media is controlled by the government of the day.No one can broadcast a statement before it is vetted. China was able to control its citizens by having a firm control of what the media dispenses.

    SuckaBubby | July 13, 2014 at 12:41 PM |
    I don’t see why our energy policy is or should be adrift.We had a brilliant mind who walked and worked among us.Professor Oliver Headley’s work is documented and should be our first point of reference in moving our energy policy forward.
    Heard a comment expressed that Prof. ‘Headley died under suspicious circumstances, HE WAS TOO FAR AHEAD OF THE TIMES…..

    On the issue of the ‘Municipal Tax: Every one should insist on full transparency of the agreement between government and the private company involved. The minister must state whether he viewed other alternatives; was the project sent out to tender; Bajans need to know the full cost;how the project will be funded;(In stages or full amount up front); The length of time before bajans will see a return on the money; who benefits from the revenue, the energy that is produced; who monitors the plant for in case of any pollution.

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  40. Due Diligence July 14, 2014 at 10:14 AM #

    Paradox said

    China was able to control its citizens by having a firm control of what the media dispenses.

    Yes, and China will be able to control Barbadians by having firm control of the Barbados Government through its grants and “concessionary” financing – the concessions being granted by Barbados.

    Like

  41. Well Well July 14, 2014 at 1:50 PM #

    Paradox said:
    “Heard a comment expressed that Prof. ‘Headley died under suspicious circumstances, HE WAS TOO FAR AHEAD OF THE TIMES…..”

    That is what black bajans like to do to the black geniuses who walk among them, but alas, it’s to their own detriment and will now haunt them for several decades to come……you reap what you sow..

    Due…..everyone one and his aunt will soon be controlling Barbados, everyone except the people who live there.

    Like

  42. Life changer July 14, 2014 at 2:56 PM #

    We need and should be at the four front of solar energy. The world latest on the subject leaves us still in a strong position
    “Cadmium chloride is toxic and expensive, and we no longer need to use it. Replacing it with a naturally occurring substance could save the industry a vast amount of money and reduce the overall cost for generating power from solar,”
    It is not possible to estimate how much cheaper the new solar cells will be, but magnesium chloride is about one per cent of the cost of cadmium chloride. In addition, waste disposal will be far easier and cheaper with a product based on a non-toxic salt.
    Why the solar power industry had not thought of using magnesium chloride before, seems genuinely an oversite.
    The additional uses of solar across the carribbean alone could make Barbados a world leader in solar powered systems. Storage of that free power is the only real problem for the private home. What no power bills, and years of royalties for Bajan’s. NO BRAINER for our Politicians.

    Like

  43. Colonel Buggy July 14, 2014 at 5:48 PM #

    @Well Well
    what is wrong with you people?
    Don’t think that you have access to todays Nation as yet ,but there is a letter to the editor written by Carl Moore, in which he makes reference to Historian Richard Ligon’s book , “A True And Exact History Of The Island of Barbados.”

    ” ………..the Negroes were allowed each man two mackerels a week,and every woman one;which were given out to them on Saturday in the evening,after they had their allowance of plantains,which was everyone a large bunch, or two little ones,to serve them for a week’s provision ;and if any cattle died by mischance , or by any disease, the servants (meaning the indentured workers)ate the bodies and the negroes the skins, heads entrails which were divided amongst them by the overseer; or if any horse, then the whole bodies of them were distributed amongst the Negroes, and that they thought a high feast,with which never poor souls were more contented…….”

    So what has changed. Only today other things have taken the place of Mackerels, plantains, dead cattle or dead horses.

    Like

  44. Tvirus August 9, 2014 at 6:43 AM #

    Barbados Planning Electric Vehicle Pilot Project in 2014
    Caribbean island nation currently spends some $250 million annual on transportation fuels.
    Published: 26-Nov-2013

    The Government [of Barbados] has a plan to carry out a pilot project with electric vehicles next year.

    This was revealed by Minister in the Office of the Prime Minister, Senator Darcy Boyce, during an interview with the media at the Electric Vehicle Rally 2013 held yesterday. The Rally started at government headquarters in Bay Street and concluded at Wildey Business Park.

    “About 30 per cent, I understand, of our fuel imports goes into the transportation industry. So that is close to about $250 million a year and if we can begin to reduce the use of that fuel it obviously helps the economy and it reduces our need for as much foreign exchange. So we have looked at the power generation, we are working on that and our next hurdle is going to be the transportation industry so that we can be able to make some gains from that.”

    We are still awaiting the pilot study.
    I don’t the Senator Boyce is really serious about this matter .
    I am calling on the Government of Barbados to reduce the duties & other taxes on electric vehicles by at least 50%.

    Like

  45. anonomous August 9, 2014 at 6:53 AM #

    Sorry for the error,should read:
    I don’t think Senator Boyce is serious…

    Like

  46. anonomous August 9, 2014 at 7:05 AM #

    I agree a 100% with your comments , t-virus.Ask BU members to sign a petition and send it to the Senator.
    BU members need to come together , stop fighting each other.
    Let us lobby government to reduce taxes on electric cars.

    Like

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