The Bajan Delicacy Pudding n Souse

Submitted by Old Onions Bag

Pudding n Souse

sweet too sweet, young bajan Huck Finn…

****************************
As a boy coming from a plantation in St. Andrew, my first introduction to farm life was met with disdain and somewhat shame, as the agrarian life style was a total humdrum. Compared to escaping to the beaches of the East Coast road or even visits to Edgewater gully and Long pond, … why should I be feeding chickens, watering cows and washing down the dirty pig stys. For those who remembered, Onions was a champion boat  builder and racer, earning the nickname of Gibber. I was a good fisherman too, holding many baby travali and pompas with only a spool of 10 lb test, purchased with misered pocket money gotten from the farmland chores.

Why I preferred visiting the pristine white sands of Cleavers Hole, flicking for sea cockroaches (which were placed in a sand filled bucket as bait), than cutting sheep and rabbit meat, in the hot midday sun. Preferred, baiting a white cockroach on a jack hook, and tossing it in Bathsheba cooling waters and waiting for that nibble ..dit dit boom, as the fish exploded at the end of the line, making a mad dash to escape the pain of the barbed hook.

As I matured more in years, this farm hand was informed he would be going Cawmeer, and as such would need to hone his skills more in the direction of a doctor or lawyer…feeding the pigs and cutting sour grass was now a chore for the hired hands.

I  was to find more time for reading Wordsworth and Shakespeare and that lot. Equally during this time, I discovered a true love for pig and palate. Every Saturday, Mama Gibb indulged in the art of making swine n brine (as it was known then)…and became somewhat of a connoisseur. The concocting of steam potatoes in pre-washed cow intestines with a benevolent measure of the pork and cucumber n pepper (oh yes plenty) collaborated nicely with a ripe aged breadfruit. The smell was also most heavenly, and every Saturday around 11.30 a.m, cars could be seen in a long line up and down the cart road,… their occupants, utensil in hand, awaiting a supple measure of the intricacy that was sold to pay  for my Waterford education.

With time, I also got involved in the art of “swining and brining”and to good measure. With good jocose..” Snout, D souse ent dun yet ?” could often be heard when I should have been into Chaucer for the Monday’s exam. Oft I could be seen up to the elbows, stirring the ever now popular Saturday bajan delicacy and afterwards when all the cars were gone, self indulging in  glorious soliloquy.

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0 responses to “The Bajan Delicacy Pudding n Souse

  1. islandgal246

    Listen I ent want none of dem toolooloos , dem likkle red crab yuh does see running all over de place. I want BIG ones.

  2. old onion bags

    D real macoy….we style

  3. old onion bags

    @ IsLGal
    I leff ova a 100 swamp dog crab..(old ones)…fa you back in the gully wid you name write pon den…Edgewater Gully…lol….keep one fa Sarge…the ugly one wid 5 feet ….and one petty. He so ole he turning PURPLE…huee

  4. islandgal246

    Yuh is a reel ole goat Onions!

  5. @Onions

    You can keep dem land crabs that just walk out of somebody’s Pit. Back in the day I used to get my crab from Graeme Hall swamp, today I have graduated to Lobster

  6. old onion bags

    @ Sarge
    What pit what. On the East coast…..these aint Town crabs….that the wharfie boys from town used to hold in ham tins behind the bus stand….I bet you thought we meant those….Des crabs we purge for two days before eating…..The BIG PURPLE one I saw last night was so ole ..like it was in a battle.

  7. old onion bags

    @ ISLgal
    DEM scrannie Caroni crabs boi…..crab I got in dis barrel petty as big as one a dem…..man den is retard crab….you want crab chk Joes’ River or Long Pond..dem baby crab boi… lil crab boi..

  8. old onion bags

  9. old onion bags

    Softie US boy like Sarge…. waana see the cray fish….hmmm

  10. islandgal246

    Oh gawd Onions why yuh gotta put dat on man I hungry fuh some crab and dumplings.

  11. old onion bags

    Those Trini dumplins looks like potato chips…..stuppess … IsGal if you want dumplings check out D Port Hole soup…big like a cuff…bruggadun !!
    A crab is $ 20…..so if you want…I going burning again tonight in Graeme Hall..this time.

  12. old onion bags

    A trini suga Dumplin….ent want nuttin …wid she

  13. islandgal246

    $20.00? Like yuh is a con man or what? I ent want nuh swamp crabs dem got some big as cat in dey! Dem does eat the shite dem people does put down round dey. Give me the crabs from St. Andrew any day!

  14. old onion bags

    LOL…….LOL…SARGE…..Ya hear fa ya self…DEM is doggie dumplin crabs you used to eat…no wonda ya head tear….lol..murda lol…..whaloss..ya duz call them aarson crab….

  15. @Sargeant you never hear bout purging land crabs.

  16. @ old onions

    Why did I have to go and remind you about burning? In the day, when I started as a kid we used smut lamps. A rum bottle, crocus bag wick and kerosene. Now I have graduated to electric torch lights. Bright for days, can stay by Edgewater Bridge and see my family in Lakes, St. Andrew.

    Now you gone and tell the whole world about we big assed crabs in Joe’s River Gully. So you left all the “old Alleynes”…. that is what we called the extra large males with the giant claws. Not good eating, always smell rank like goat piss.

    Be a nice country boy and give poor Island Gal two of them crabs from me. You never know, she may give you some chutney!

  17. old onion bags

    Joe River Gully run from the Flower Forest, Welchman Hall down to the sea…besides everyone can’t burn….they might catch a fire…lol..Give IslanGal a smutt lamp and point she in the direction of Long Pond cuz she funny as ass…not me and she…she husband problem not mine…besides I got a BIG family.DEM crabs already ration out..

  18. @Onions

    Notice I said “back in the day”, I don’t know what has happened in GHS since I left but you can keep on eating the land crabs. Now “Pat” claiming that you eating old “rank” crabs, BTW my sister in law is Trini and she makes a great Calaloo.

    @Hants

    I hear about purging Swamp Crabs the land crabs were a different variety.

  19. Colonel Buggy.

    old onion bags | August 10, 2012 at 9:42 PM |
    Joe River Gully run from the Flower Forest, Welchman Hall down to the sea…besides everyone can’t burn….they might catch a fire…lol..Give IslanGal a smutt lamp and point she in the direction of Long Pond cuz she funny as ass…not me and she…she husband problem not mine…besides I got a BIG family.DEM crabs already ration out..
    **********************************************************************
    Remember when the old District F Police station was on top of Bissex Hill? Around mid -day you were able to see every stream,glistening, up in the hills making their way down to Joes River. Today its all covered in thick bush.

  20. old onion bags

    @ Colonel
    Your memory serves you well brigadier…I don’t recall, but I take your word obviously…..there were times when Barbados central was so cold on mornings (in Mar, April), it snowed in certain parts of St.JosephAndrew…this is no lie…I saw the heavy precipitation at first and was called out by my friend RR to visit Bissex Hill….I think it was 1976 …..there was a fluffy cotton like floatation in the air and it was real real cold..for the short while….this blowing cotton like stuff lasted for about 20 mins till the sun climbed and conditions warmed…Do you recall lieutenant?

  21. Onions i notice you in invite your nemesis AC to share your Crab meal , shame on you man. i knew an old woman in coach hill who enjoyed sucking out the part of the crab which she say had in the shit, lived to the ripe old age of 98.

  22. old onion bags

    Barbadians got all sorta discerning taste….as with others…in the crab video with the Asian fellow….they enjoy that part of the crab..I think he called it crab butter…which do you like balance the butter or the neck? …hope you live to 100 even…lol

  23. Have not been on this blog for awhile. @Pat…Aunt Bets & Uncle Col Parkinson. My father Gordon Parkinson was family, first cousin, to both of them. And please no comments about the incestuous behaviour of Bajans ’cause we all know it so. Aunt Bets & Uncle Col were the sweetest. Talk about food. Funny,,, at the beginning of my book – a culinary tour (my culinary tour hear?) of the island I refer to them and those days at Bathsheba…lawd the food, the food….and yes! their daughter Roslyn not so bad either…talk about a feast we had not too long ago at her home with family I did not even know existed. Pat Parkinson was alive then. Bless her heart. Food has definitely been a integral part of the Parkinson family’s lives. Both my parent were from Trinidad, Dad’s father being the Bajan. Mom’s family Trini and Grenadian. We children were all born in Venezuela. My Dad’s dream was to be an artist for the rest of his life, so he worked hard as hell in the bush of Venezuela building water wells and at the age of 40 hauled the whole family to Barbados for him to begin his new career and for us to learn the English language…not the Bajan English language although we were forced into it but the Queen’s English language taught at CHS and all other schools in those days. From the age of 16 I have been a nomad and Barbados has always been where the nomad returned because of family ties. The Caribbean has always been my passion and I see its unity from Bermuda down to South and across to Central America and being the only way to combat the ills of the US society that trickles into our own. So there you have it. Family and a little personal history and proud of it!!!

    I ent know much about all ya…but now you know a bunch about me. Who cares. A name is nothing. It is what you are and believe in that is all and more. Bless.

  24. But here is the recipe for Oil Dong given to me in writing by the Grenadian workers at the Spice Gardens, Grenada. We cooked it one night under the full moon where one had to sit close to the wood fire and huge buck pot sitting on top to get way from the sand flies! But it sure tasted sweet. Oh! The recipe came with these rules: 1. Invite a few close friends to meet by a river, at the beach, on a forest, or just at home in the backyard at an appointed time. 2. Give each one a list of what to bring – some ingredient, or coolers, ice, rum, rum punch or beers. 3. Get hold of a large, preferably iron pot. 4. Bring enough wood for lighting a good lasting fire and you’re off. 5. Last but not least, bring insect repellent!:

    Oil Dong (enough for six people)
    3 hard coconuts
    1 piece of turmeric, peeled & grated
    1/2 cup vegetable oil
    2 pounds chicken wings
    1 pound saltfish soaked in water overnight
    1 salted pigtail, whole
    6 green bananas, peeled and cut in half
    1 whole breadruit, peeled and cut in chunks
    12 medium-sized leaves of callaloo bush (dasheen leaves)
    1 leaf shadow bennie, finely chopped (also spelled chadon beni)
    4 onions, peeled and finely chopped
    6 cloves garlic, peeled and finely chopped
    6 stalks fresh chives, finely chopped
    3 leaves broad leaf thyme, finely chopped
    4 fresh mint leaves, finely chopped
    6 leaves fresh basil, finely chopped
    2 hot red peppers, whole
    2 seasoning peppers, finely chopped
    Salt & pepper to taste

    Dumplings:

    2 cups flour (cassava flour can be used)
    1/2 cup butter
    1 teaspoon salt
    1 teaspoon powdered cinnamon
    water.

    Make a ‘stove’ by gathering enough rocks to shape a circle that will hold up a grill. Place enough wood in it to make a fire and light. Break and grate the hard inside white flesh of the coconut. Add turmeric and extract milk by pouring hot water over the grated coconut and squeezing through a muslin bag. (6 cans of coconut milk can be substituted (but this is for ‘wuzzies’ – my words), add the turmeric, bring to the boil and put yellow milk through the sieve to get rid of the grated turmeric but keeping the yellow colouring which should be bright yellow). Place the iron pot on the fire with the vegetable oil within, When hot add chicken wings. Cook until slightly brown. Add the turmeric and coconut milk. Add all other ingredients. If not enough coconut milk to cover all ingredients with 3 inches of liquid, add more milk or a little water. Cover until the mixture begins to boil. Meanwhile, in a bowl, mix the flour and butter and crumble. Add the salt and cinnamon and mix well. Add enough water to make a sticky but firm dough, form the dough into small balls, roll into 4-inch lengths and set aside. Allow the oil dong to boil slowly for approximately 45 minutes, adding the dumplings 20 minutes before finished. The oil dong should be covered but one should stir it now and then to ensure that the bottom does not start to burn. When finished, serve in calabash and eat with a spoon.

    And then I was told. Belly full. Eyes close.

  25. islandgal246

    Rosemary yuh gotta line de pot wid banana leaves and cover the top wid dem as well. That is how the peoples from Grenville and La Digue made it!

  26. Oh god! you people love to eat i already have indigestion just by readi n g the recipe too much food wuhloss my belly hurt!

  27. old onion bags

    Why thank ya Rosie Gurl..”ah did taut ya did huff ma”….lol….I will try his one sounds supper as a bonfire delight…hmmmm,

  28. @ Rosemary Parkinson

    Well, well, well. It is indeed a small world. I do remember you. You three girls were always together. I think you were the slim one. Remember I have not seen any of you for 45 years.

    You are believe it or not, part of the family. If you need crabs for callaloo, you know where to go and ask. Or, ask Roslyn to get her contacts to catch you some.

    You are from a very, very, good family. A family that is well loved by MY family. Your family, the Parvencinios, the Gibbs, the Marshalls and of course our relatives the Roberts and the Chandlers. We will be forever grateful. May you live long and prosper. How is your cousin, little Jeffrey? I do not hear anything about him.

    i will buy your book next March when I come home. I used to read your columns in the paper. Continue the good work. By the way, Ma Parkie called me Patricia, the others by my nickname.

  29. Pat…my first name is indeed Patricia…but I was always called Rosemary by my parents. And yes…you are right…there are three of us! When we used to go to town in dem days (not saying which year!) with my mother…Bajans used to call us “the four Venie/Trini Parkinson sisters”!!! My Mom being young too. Have website…not much time to keep it up to date but …
    http://www.rosemaryparkinson.com

    Jeff is fine…a handsome young man who is now a grandfather too! I am now a great-grandmother…lawd have is mercy….and now all on BU getting to know me far too personal. But I straight and tell it like it is. If I am wrong, I will say so and if ah right, ah right.

    Island Gal…that night we never had the banana leaves but hey! banana leaf makes a lot of things so very special….funny….I have this story to tell. A British couple who had befriended a Trinidad couple in London were sent some Xmas pastelles and a bottle of Ponche Crema as a gift so they could get a feel of the island at this joyous time. The British couple wrote back thanking the Trinis saying that the Ponche Crema was indeed delightful, the pastelles were also delicious but how could the Trinis chew through all that green stuff in order to get to the good parts. Dopes. For those who do not know – pastelle looks like a conkie from the ouside but inside it is a corn-based casing of spicy meats with olives, raisins and much seasonings….and you can get them here in Barbados around Christmas time…the Trini Pastelle and also the Venezuelan Hallacas (both based on the same thing, the Trini taken from the Veni so there are some differences). Both divine intervention!!!

    And now…off in search of my own divinity…pudding in the skin and souse from the features! By the way anyone out there know where I can get pudding made the traditional way with blood? ‘Cause now dat would just make my Saturday morning extra special thank you very much!!

  30. Somebody out there I want two breadfruits please. Tell muh where to go and collect.

  31. In exchange for some sweet Pa louis mangoes

  32. old onion bags

    Plenty nuff souse topped with breadfruit and nuff pickled cucumber decorating the tops…. lavished with steam puddin and nuff cucumber n nigga pepper water.. There I sat and watched history being made….THE BOLT ding dong-ing BiG Ameraca….like a donkey tying to keep up wid a thorough bred….Whalosss…both did SWEET….I enjoyed n enjoyed….11-8-12, a day to remember.May we all like to see many more..

  33. @ island Gal

    Go down Hillswick Village, right across from the Gospel Hall Cemetery and pick all you can put in your car trunk. the rastas picking them and selling, you can go get some too. Tell anyone who asks that the owner sent you.

  34. @ Rosemary

    Next March I will make you some real Bajan pudding with the pigs blood, in the skin too. I just finished eating my pudding. No souse as I have to lay off the citrus for a colorectal test.

  35. old onion bags

    Made Bajan Salt breds…last night…no Bushie Hammie not lonely, just like to eat well…..hot salt bread wid butter ..hmmmmm.best salt breads in the island…

    Ingredients
    2 lb all purpose flour
    1 pk yeast (11g)
    12 cup luke warm water
    3 oz. margarine
    strips of coconut leaf (3ins cuts)
    1tsp salt
    4 tbs Bajan Muscuvo sugar

    Place margarine in luke warm water to melt, combing sugar, salt and yeast lastly.Let stand for 3 mins in a covered bowl. Gradually work in the sieved flour gradually till tacky with wooden spoon till tacky…continue using hands in a jucking board action..kneed and kneed for 4 mins no more.
    Using a knife cut off in portions of 3 oz.balls placing them on a greased bakers pan. Allow dough to rise for 2 hours.On each dough ball, press on a coconut leaf strip.Place in a pre-warmed oven 350F, for 15 mins till bread rolls begin to kick off the leaf indicator.

    Make 10 salt breads.

  36. old onion bags

    Puddin n Souse today….Oh boy….Sarge salivating..wat d rasta

  37. old onion bags

    This one for all the stiffs shirts……leave them inches to the belly line

    Cheese Spinach Pie

    9 Inch pie shell
    1/3 Cup chopped onion
    1 Tbsp margarine

    1/4 lbs sliced cheese
    1 Cup cooked, chopped spinach(drained)
    3 Large eggs
    1/2 Cup of milk
    1/2 Tsp. salt
    Dash pepper

    Directions

    Cook onions ( not this one) in margarine until tender; cool.
    Lay slices of cheese over pie shell, follow with spinach, then onions.
    Beat the eggs, add the milk to the batter.
    Add seasonings and pour the mixture over the ingredients layered in the pie shell. Bake in 400° oven about 35 minutes, or until a knife comes out clean.

  38. SHITE !!!

  39. old onion bags

    I will allow the BU family to know boastfully….I am the best conkie maker in my clan and will not give up my secret ingredients or portions for a pound….however I will give you a decent recipe of good substance….For the real deal….you will have to be in this household….eat your heart out Bushie..lol

    2lbs sweet potatoes
    4lbs garden pumpkin
    1 hard coconut grated
    3 oz coconut milk
    2lbs sugar
    2 cups spring water
    14 margarine
    12 skim milk
    12 raisins
    vanilla essence to taste
    1 nut meg
    1 tsp mixed spice
    10 banana leaves singed

    Mix together pumpkins, sweet potatoes, coconut with milks, sugar margarine raisins and spices in a large bowl. Could do two mixings if smaller bowl. Mixture should be slushy and not too thick, otherwise add more milk. Place 4oz spoon fulls in a singed banana leaf and fold to a shop keepers package imitate. Take a big sauce pan, 14 fill with criss cross banana leaf centre stems to form a protective barrier from the bottom fire heat and allowing more even distribution of steam. Put in 3 cups of tap water to 14 fill the sauce pan. Load in your packaged conkies to 34 fill pot..Steam till leaves turn brown with saucepan lid on for 12 hrs occasionally adding water to allow adequate steaming process.

    Makes 20- 3oz conkies…serves luke warm ..can also be refrigerated for a week. Enjoy and Happy Independence..Gibberts style.

  40. old onion bags

    @ Sarge
    Plenty nuff souse topped with breadfruit and nuff pickled cucumber decorating the tops…. lavished with steam puddin and nuff cucumber n nigga pepper water..
    ***********************************
    Sargie boi..I in cloud nine right bout now…..a Johnnie Walker in the right…a pig trotter in D left……Hants boi….”this is D life”….whalosss

  41. old onion bags

    @ Bushie

    I will not Lie, Cheat or Steal…..remember dat….

  42. old onion bags

    .. a complimentary pig foot here for somebody….if they want it…tekk care afterwards the souse water LEAKS out….Oh my laud LOL

  43. old onion bags

    Time for the usual peeps……

  44. Bajan Conkies Recipe……..Happy Independence

    2lbs sweet potatoes
    4lbs garden pumpkin
    1 hard coconut grated
    3 oz coconut milk
    2lbs sugar
    2 cups spring water
    14 margarine
    12 skim milk
    12 raisins
    vanilla essence to taste
    1 nut meg
    1 tsp mixed spice
    10 banana leaves singed

    Mix together pumpkins, sweet potatoes, coconut with milks, sugar margarine raisins and spices in a large bowl. Could do two mixings if smaller bowl. Mixture should be slushy and not too thick, otherwise add more milk. Place 4oz spoon fulls in a singed banana leaf and fold to a shop keepers package imitate. Take a big sauce pan, 14 fill with criss cross banana leaf centre stems to form a protective barrier from the bottom fire heat and allowing more even distribution of steam. Put in 3 cups of tap water to 14 fill the sauce pan. Load in your packaged conkies to 34 fill pot..Steam till leaves turn brown with saucepan lid on for 12 hrs occasionally adding water to allow adequate steaming process.

    Makes 20- 3oz conkies…serves luke warm ..can also be refrigerated for a week. Enjoy and Happy Independence..Gibberts style.

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