Tag Archives: University of the West Indies

Whither the School of Medical Sciences at Cave Hill!

Submitted by Lemuel
...Class of 1969 (Professor Henry Fraser’s Class) 50% went to the US to do their internship and most of them never returned...

Class of 1969 (Professor Henry Fraser’s Class) 50% went to the US to do their internship and most of them never returned

The University of the West Indies (UWI) was established in 1948. Currently, it has full campuses in Jamaica, Trinidad and Barbados. The Mona Medical Faculty started in 1948 with 33 students. To date, the UWI has produced over 7,000 medical graduates. In 2008, the Cave Hill Campus took the bold step to establish a full faculty of medical sciences.

History

The UWI took over from Codrington College, which was the only institution that offered higher education at the degree level by 1953. Degrees in the Classics, Humanities and Theology were offered. All of this was done in affiliation with Durham University. However, it should be noted that the primary intent of the Codrington Will was to ensure that the College would have offered medical degrees. It is not clear why that was not done.

Therefore, any Caribbean national seeking medical education had to journey to Canada, the UK and the US. By September 1946, with an affiliation with the University of London, a medical school was set up in Mona, Jamaica. Over 600 students applied for entry, but only 33 were accepted after enduring a “special entrance examination” and interviews.

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To Barbadians ALL – Sir Hilary Beckles the TRUTH!

Submitted by Douglas
Sir Hilary Beckles Principal of UWI, Cave Hill

Sir Hilary Beckles Principal of UWI, Cave Hill

I write this out of a concern that we are not hearing the FULL TRUTH about this issue of the FUNDING of UWI education. As I read the comments of the Principal and Pro-Vice Chancellor, Professor Sir Hilary McDonald Beckles, I Cry shame on a man I formerly respected. As one of his former students I admired his brilliance and indeed while I have lost respect for this man, I must admit he did much to transform many aspects of the Cave Hill Campus. He built buildings, indeed monuments. I did hear staff, teaching and other, complain that you could not question him, he alone, had all the answers. I understand he brooks no opposition.

I was listening to many callers overs the past few months, and most recently when I heard a Government Minister trying to rationalise the decision to have students pay part of the cost of their education at UWI. I asked myself, how did we get here? Those who support the Government say this should have been in place a long time ago. Those who oppose the Government say students should not pay. We need to hear from the Minister of Education. He did not even touch this in the Estimates Debate. I have been trying to understand why we have reached this point, and have been asking questions of all kinds of people. They have all left me with more questions than answers and I therefore want to pose some questions to the University, its Principal, Deputy Principal and all the senior managers as well as the Minister of Education (and those who went before him).

Continue readingBeckles II, Beckles III, Beckles IV and Beckles V

CARICOM STOCK MARKET REVIEW 2012

Compiled by the Department of Management Studies, UWI, Cave Hill

Compiled by the Department of Management Studies, UWI, Cave Hill

NEW LISTINGS AND DELISTINGS

There were a number of listings and De-Listings across the regional exchanges in 2012. On the Bahamas International Securities Exchange, Arawak Port Development was listed on April 23 2012. In Guyana, Rupununi Development Company Limited was listed on March 19 2012. In Jamaica, First Caribbean International Bank Jamaica, First Jamaica Investments Limited, Montego Freeport and Pegasus Hotels were De-listed, while on the main market Proven Investments was listed, and, Consolidated Bakeries, Paramount Trading Jamaica, C2W Music Limited and K. L.E. Group Limited were listed on the Junior Market. Supreme Ventures was De-listed from the Trinidad and Tobago Stock Exchange.

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WEEKLY CARICOM STOCK REPORT 3 December to 7 December 2012

Compiled by the Department of Management Studies, UWI, Cave Hill

Compiled by the Department of Management Studies, UWI, Cave Hill

Keep It Simple.
Keeping it simple in investing is not stupid. Seventeenth-century philosopher Blaise Pascal once said, “All man’s miseries derive from not being able to sit quietly in a room alone.” This aptly describes the investing process. Those who trade too often, focus on irrelevant data points, or try to predict the unpredictable are likely to encounter some unpleasant surprises when investing. By keeping it simple–focusing on companies with economic moats, requiring a margin of safety when buying, and investing with a long-term horizon–you can greatly enhance your odds of success.

 

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WEEKLY CARICOM STOCK REPORT 12 November to 16 November 2012

Compiled by the Department of Management Studies, UWI Cave Hill

Listen to Your Gut.
Any valuation model you may create for a company is only as good as the assumptions about the future that are put into it. If the output of a model does not make sense, then it’s worthwhile to double-check your projections and calculations. Use DCF valuation models (or any other valuation models) as guides, not oracles.

Know Your Friends, and Your Enemies.
What’s the short interest in a stock you are interested in? What mutual funds own the company, and what is the record of those fund managers? Does company management have “skin in the game” via a meaningful ownership stake? Have company insiders been selling or buying? At the margin, these are valuable pieces of collateral evidence for your investment thesis on a company.

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CARIBBEAN STOCK REPORT 22 October to 26 October 2012

Compiled by the Department of Management Studies, UWI Cave Hill – Click image to read in PDF

Solid gains on manufacturing stocks drove the major Caribbean indices higher during the week ended October 26. For the week, 3,963,727 shares valued at $4,418,471 crossed the floors of the six stock exchanges across Caricom, with 43 stocks advancing, 36 declining and 44 remaining unchanged. Caribbean Producers was the volume leader with 719,093 shares being traded, Ciboney posted the largest gain for the week (12.32%), while on the losing end, Caribbean Cement fell (10.16%).

For the week, thirteen of the CSX 30 stocks advanced, eleven declined and six were unchanged. The CSX 30 gained 2.79 points to close the week at 1,404.27, up 6.79% year to date. In the CSX 30 there were gains for Wibisco (5.47%), Mayberry (3.17%) and scotia Group Jamaica (1.59%). On the negative side, Caribbean Cement fell (10.16%), NCB Jamaica (6.08%),CW Jamaica (4.78%), Guardian Holdings (3.68%), Desnoe & Geddes (2.12%) and Grace Kennedy (1.17%).

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WEEKLY CARICOM STOCK REPORT 24 September to 28 September 2012

Compiled by the Department of Management Studies, UWI Cave Hill

The weakness in Caribbean stock in 2012 continued as the major indices ended the week of September 28 lower.  The major indices were dragged down by losses on manufacturing and financial companies, however, there was some respite for investors on the Junior markets as that index ended the week in positive territory.  For the week,  22,767,153 shares  valued at $6,298,829 crossed the floors of the six stock exchanges across Caricom, with 22 stocks advancing,  59 declining and 43 remaining  unchanged.  JMMB was again the volume leader with 14,556,430 shares being traded, C&W Jamaica posted the largest gain for the week (9.56%), while on the losing end, Bank of Nevis fell (23.53%).

For the week, six of the CSX 30 stocks advanced,  seventeen declined and seven were unchanged.  The CSX 30 lost 1.98 points to close the week at 1,388.18, up 5.57% year to date.    In the CSX 30 there were gains for CW Jamaica (9.56%), Carreras (1.26%) and Scotia Bank TT (1.01%).  On the negative side, Desnoe & Geddes fell (6.53%), Guardian Holdings (3.13%), Scotia Group Jamaica (1.73%) and Lascelles (1.28%).

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