Tag Archives: Barbados Elections

Choose Bajans: Urgent Fresh Elections or an IMF/DLP Programme of Austerity and Suffering Even Worse Than 1991?

Henderson Bovell

Henderson Bovell

The downgrade by Standard and Poors is proof that, you can hijack the truth – even hold it hostage for a short time (as it is now crystal clear the DLP did before the February 2013 general elections) but “truth” will always escape and expose you, as the DLP is now finding out.

Before the February elections, Barbadians were assured by the same DLP that said that: it will not “cheat;” it will not “steal” and it will not “lie” – that the economy was “stable.” But soon after February, “truth” was able to escape and the country heard “for the first time” (despite an alleged report to the nation during the general election campaign when nothing was said) that the QEH could not pay a multi-million-dollar bill for medicines and that the Transport Board had spent $30 million it did not have and having done that – licked-out an overdraft for a further $10 million. You see part of why Barbados is in serious trouble?

Trademark fiscal recklessness like the Transport Board spending that $40 million it did not have  – will hardly escape the Auditor General but it constitutes the same cost overrun the dems  said will not happen – under a DLP Government?  Do you see why you need to urgently reel-in the DLP and why no patriotic person in Barbados; sensible person within the Caribbean or  respected institutions around the world –  have confidence in the DLP; trust them or want to risk taking them seriously?

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Prime Minister Fruendel's Stuart's General Election Declaration

Document supplied compliments of Plantation Deeds

It is not the norm for the general public to get sight of how our political candidates allocate financial resources to support an election campaign. Caswell Franklyn has already asked some probing questions regarding Minister of Finance Chris Sinckler’s election declaration – Sinckler’s Honest Election Return. Here is the Prime Minister’s declaration with the compliments of Plantation Deeds.

 

2013 General Election Media Campaign

The 2013 General Election is behind us and the analysis is  being processed by those interested to determine the factors which led to the final result. There is surprise that the Democratic Labour Party (DLP) ran a media campaign which was more effective in persuading voters. One DLP TV Ad capitalized on the Barbados Labour Party (BLP) blunder of introducing the privatization issue to the campaign. BLP supporters have accused the DLP that the Ad misrepresented their position.

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Campaign Finance Reform Needed

Submitted by the Mahogany Coconut Think Tank and Watchdog Group
How did two poor political parties raised millions to fund a three week political campaign?

How did two poor political parties raised millions to fund a three week political campaign?

The Mahogany Coconut Group submits that the real vote buying is in the upper echelons of our society. What we witnessed on Election Day was some voters getting cash, cell phones, IPods and a bill paid here and there. The real votes were bought by those shadows- black and white, – who Dr. Don Blackman referred to a few decades ago! Of course Dr. Blackman talked only about white shadows but the corporate landscape has dramatically changed over the years – we now have shadows of all colors and ethnicities.

While we shout from the roof tops about what took place on elections day, we bury our heads in the proverbial sand, by refusing to ask one simple question: How did the two political parties, both claiming to be rather financially impoverished, raise a conservative estimate of over twenty million dollars to pour into a three week campaign? We ask Dale Marshall (BLP) to tell us about the successful “cake sales and car washes” that raised their money. We ask Ronald Jones (DLP) to tell us more about the “$500 here and there” that was given to his party by well wishers. Let’s face it; elections are now big business and the corporate shadows are well entrenched in both the Barbados Labour Party and the Democratic Labour Party.

Anybody who believes that car washes, cake sales and a five hundred dollar donation here and there, can raise this large amount of money, needs to seriously wake up from his/her slumber!

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Post General Election 2013: A Time to Decompose the Rhetoric

Building a brighter future

Building a brighter future

After what has been described as one of the most bruising political campaigns in history of Barbados, the commonsense approach is for all Barbadians to quickly put our shoulders to the plough in the interest of country. There is no time for the traditional honeymoon period. Prime Minister Fruendel Stuart needs to quickly get his human and other resources in position. The current state of the local economy is well documented and should not become loss in the euphoria of an election victory.  The prospect of a challenging winter season does not bode will for the country in the short term. Restructuring the economy will take time.

The dust has not settled after 2013 General Elections but the BU household continues to be concerned about the relatively low voter turnout. The data for the 2013 General Election are (not datum) still being crunched but  according to CADRES we had about a 60% turnout in 2013. The question which Barbadians need to ask is whether this situation should continue to go unaddressed. It was interesting to listen to Mia Mottley in an interview after the general election result was known. Her focus on the need to address governance issues should align well with Prime Minister Stuart on this issue who is seen by many as a man of integrity.

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Notes From a Native Son: Before Voting, think with your heads and not your hearts

Hal Austin

Hal Austin

Introduction:
When the voters of Barbados enter the polling booths on Thursday, it will be an enormous challenge for them to abandon old political tribal loyalties and objectively put the nation, future generations and their own futures before irrationally supporting a party or candidate they have always supported, while suspending reason. The harsh truth is that this is the most testing general election, not only since November 30, 1966, but since the early 1950s and the introduction of internal self-government.

In the new globalised world, there is no turning back for small nation states such as Barbados. New global organisations, such as the World Trade Organisation and the newly re-energised International Monetary Fund, now have power over small states, mostly wrapped up in international treaties, that they have never had before. At the same time, rich and powerful nations are subsidising their farmers and industrialists, such as car manufacturing and farming in the US, farming in the EU, and a long list of state-owned or controlled industries in China, which put further pressure on small states. But we are not just economic people, as a nation we are rounded with equal value given to our social relations, our civic and moral responsibilities and our cultural and creative environment.

Increasing Government Productivity:
One of the biggest drags on growth in Barbados is public sector efficiency, from improvements in technology, competent management to output per person. One only has to read the annual report of the auditor-general to see the extent of public sector incompetence. Take a simple, but important example, uncollected VAT. Value added tax is a sales tax paid by consumers and collected by trades and service people. For convenience, that money is paid to the government at pre-set dates – monthly, quarterly etc. However, in Barbados, there is a huge backlog of payments, of business people failing to handover to government monies collected on its behalf.

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Good Luck at the Polls Barbadians and Remember the ‘One Lesson’

Submitted by Peter Brathwaite
Good luck Barbadians

Good luck Barbadians

Fellow Barbadians,

We go to the polls this Thursday. Emotion, anticipation and excitement fill the air (along with the ‘noise’ of the various political parties canvassing late into the night). Posters and flyers (and big as shite billboards) blanket our landscape (yet no one dared put their respective flyers/posters on the fancy pedestrian over-pass out by CBC last time I saw).

Both parties have published their manifestos. Of particular interest to some, if not most of us, will be the proposed economic policies of both parties. During the analysis of same, I ask that each and every one of you stop, hold strain and consider the words of Henry Hazlitt. Journalist, economist, philosopher, critic and author of the easy to read: Economics In One Lesson.

The “One Lesson” is stated in Part One of the book:

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